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Old 05-16-2024, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Taos NM
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There's articles and videos about the severe housing crisis in Canada and how egregious prices are to wages. But I really have a hard time believing that all of Canada really has expensive houses and a lot of shortages. I'm assuming small towns in Canada more reasonably priced?

I get why big cities are expensive, there's limited land. But there's endless amounts of options for available space for small town Canada to grow. And to the extent there's not more affordable growth, how on earth did the country with the most land, water, hydropower, lumber... etc you name it, every piece you need to build houses not build more houses???

I don't know all the details, but it seems like the housing issues in Canada are just people being reluctant to leave their urban enclave. If people would take their retirement or remote job and move out to small town Canada, all those issues disappear.
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Old 05-16-2024, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
33,587 posts, read 37,225,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
There's articles and videos about the severe housing crisis in Canada and how egregious prices are to wages. But I really have a hard time believing that all of Canada really has expensive houses and a lot of shortages. I'm assuming small towns in Canada more reasonably priced?

I get why big cities are expensive, there's limited land. But there's endless amounts of options for available space for small town Canada to grow. And to the extent there's not more affordable growth, how on earth did the country with the most land, water, hydropower, lumber... etc you name it, every piece you need to build houses not build more houses???

I don't know all the details, but it seems like the housing issues in Canada are just people being reluctant to leave their urban enclave. If people would take their retirement or remote job and move out to small town Canada, all those issues disappear.
As of May 2024, the median rent for all bedroom counts and property types in Vancouver, BC is $2,950.

Average rent in Gold River, BC. population 1,246 is 1,875. Still pretty pricey.
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Old 05-16-2024, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
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I imagine the issues in Canada are similar to here in Australia. In Sydney the median monthly rent is now $A3,200., which is $2,900 in Canadian dollars. Rental is in very short supply, we had 47 groups inspect our small two bedroom rental a couple of months ago. It is a huge political issue.

You would think in these enormous countries that people would be happy to find a smaller cheaper town. However, here they usually lack services of most kinds and above all do not have the range of employment available.

Also in earlier times a large number of people would retire to the country towns, especially coastal. Not so much now, though some do, as many people assist with the care of grandkids or want to be close to the major health care facilities and even to international airports.

In Canada a lot of the country would be too cold for a comfortable life, here the opposite, the interior is too hot and dry.
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Old 05-16-2024, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
33,587 posts, read 37,225,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
I imagine the issues in Canada are similar to here in Australia. In Sydney the median monthly rent is now $A3,200., which is $2,900 in Canadian dollars. Rental is in very short supply, we had 47 groups inspect our small two bedroom rental a couple of months ago. It is a huge political issue.

You would think in these enormous countries that people would be happy to find a smaller cheaper town. However, here they usually lack services of most kinds and above all do not have the range of employment available.

Also in earlier times a large number of people would retire to the country towns, especially coastal. Not so much now, though some do, as many people assist with the care of grandkids or want to be close to the major health care facilities and even to international airports.

In Canada a lot of the country would be too cold for a comfortable life, here the opposite, the interior is too hot and dry.
I'll take the cold over the heat every day, but I think you are correct that small towns lack services, employment and a lot of other things. I think that this situation is common in most countries and will only get worse as the population grows. Take a look at the world population clock linked below. It scares hell out of me.

https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/
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Old 05-16-2024, 03:36 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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It’s not just the big cities anymore. All of Southern Ontario has extremely expensive housing and all but the very top earners of society are completely locked out of owning any type of property there. You can earn like $100k a year and you’d still need to win the lottery or make a fortune gambling in the stock market to get hundreds of thousands of dollars to put as a down payment for the smallest properties in the least desirable areas. This isn’t some overpopulated little sliver of land, Southern Ontario is about the size of the United Kingdom with 1/5th of the population. The housing shortage is very real and worsened by the hoarding of homes to be used as short term rentals like air b&bs and sitting vacant as a place to park cash. We need to allow multi family density in all urban and suburban areas province wide to get out of this mess, along with billions invested in at cost, below market purpose built rental housing construction.
If the millions of people struggling with housing in Ontario and BC moved to other provinces the problem will just spread to where they move. This happened in the maritimes. This happened in Calgary and Edmonton. We can’t just tell millions of people to quit their jobs and work as grocery story clerks in rural Saskatchewan and act like that’s a solution.
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Old 05-16-2024, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,320 posts, read 9,368,430 times
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I'm seeing rents at $1200-1600 in my area. There are still older, small houses for sale under $300,000 in my closest city but you really have to look. Houses on acreages outside the city would be 350,000 minimum and for that price you would have an older, smaller home.

In my area, with Manitoba Agriculture not wanting to lose cropland to urbanization, acreages are scarcer and valuable.

However, along the border, say in the Emerson area, houses are available for $200,000. I think I've even seen less. Here's a place for just over $200,000. https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...-e-tolstoi-r17 And here's a house for just under $100,000 https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...et-emerson-r17

But you would have to take your job with you because you won't find one there.

I recently had a couple of people come intio my office who had moved from Toronto. They didn't like big city life. They were immigrants from Africa who wanted jobs so badly they were prepared to walk for an interview to an even smaller town to what is a 30 minute car ride away. And they only arrived this week. The word "gumption" comes to mind.
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Old 05-16-2024, 04:52 PM
 
1,280 posts, read 536,306 times
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Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I'm seeing rents at $1200-1600 in my area.
Wow in Steinbach? Thats crazy.
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Old 05-16-2024, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
Wow in Steinbach? Thats crazy.
I'm not in Steinbach.
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Old 05-16-2024, 05:23 PM
 
1,280 posts, read 536,306 times
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I could have sworn you said you live in or near steinbach. My bad. Anywhere in southern manitoba those rental rates are crazy outside of Winnipeg. It's no wonder people don't want to move there either.
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Old 05-16-2024, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,320 posts, read 9,368,430 times
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But speaking of Steinbach, this is a place just outside Steinbach at 300k https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...-steinbach-r16

Here's one in Morden https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...eet-morden-r35

Here's one in Brandon https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...randon-trinity

(I would search further but I have a scared German shepherd crawling in my lap. Thunderstorm.)
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