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Old 06-09-2008, 07:29 AM
 
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I know Canadians, suffered huge loses, During The battle of the Somme, At Beaumont-Hamel, With the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, Nearly being wiped out and thats why your Memorial day, Is on the 1st of July! (Canada Day), Rather than the date of the Gallipoli Campaign?, Which is when Australia/New Zealand has our "Anzac" Memorial Day (Even Though, We were also at the Somme and you were also at Gallipoli! )

Really though, I was just wanting to know, How big is the April 25th/July 1st commemorations?, Are they observed throughout the country? (French Canadians)...and what do you do to remember?
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Old 06-09-2008, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Although you are correct in referring to July 1 as Memorial Day in Newfoundland, in the rest of the country (with 98% of the population) July 1 is Canada Day, celebrating the founding of the country on July 1, 1867. (Newfoundland did not join Canada until 1949.) There is nothing particularly military about July 1 in the rest of the country and the vast majority of Canadians in the other provinces are not even aware of the big military significance of this date in Newfoundland.

I myself take an interest in these things and even I had to do a double-take (no offence to Newfoundlanders) when I read your message, after which I thought: “Oh yeah, that’s right.”

For most of Canada, the day the country’s war dead is honoured on the same date as in many countries around the world: November 11.

All of the Canadian holidays are marked in Quebec as well, though sometimes with a lower profile however. Around November 11, people on TV and politicians in Quebec all wear poppies on their lapels just like they do in the rest of the country.

The Canada Day July 1 celebrations in Quebec do play second fiddle to the St-Jean-Baptiste celebrations, held exactly one week prior on June 24. This is the feast day of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of French Canadians. It also roughly coincides with the official start of summer (end of the school year) and the summer solstice. Since the 1970s the governments of Quebec (both separatist and non-separatist in fact) have quite successfully marketed this as Quebec’s “national holiday”, and it is to be frank a far bigger day than the July 1 Canadian celebrations.

July 1 celebrations in Quebec have been more subdued (and even non-existent in some areas), though in recent years the federal government has made efforts and things have modestly picked up.
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Old 06-09-2008, 09:36 AM
 
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That was about the extent, Of my Knowledge of Canadian WW1 involvement.....Was the Newfoundland Regiment, The only Canadians involved (As I wouldn't mind learning more )?

Sorry If I offended anyone?, I didn't realise that Newfoundland, Didn't join Canada, Until 1949 and that the Day, Really Only applies to them! ..Not too mention, I should have realised, That French Canadians, Have a different National celebration?

Thanks, I know something new, About a fellow Commonwealth Nation
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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I don't think you offended anyone at all with your questions. No worries!

Newfoundland was actually a British dominion from 1907 until 1949, so the Royal Newfoundland Regiment would have been grouped together with the British forces. The RNR became part of the Canadian forces in 1949.

Canada outside Newfoundland also made a significant contribution to World War I. Actually, proportionately speaking its war effort in 1914-1918 was greater than in 1939-1945, though large numbers of Canadians fought in both wars.

Canadian troop and casualty figures for 1914-1918 are often grouped together with the "British Empire", as Canada only became officially independent in 1931 with the Statute of Westminster (at the same time as Australia and perhaps New Zealand? I may be wrong here...)

FYI - The 1931 Statute of Westminster is not really marked at all in Canada. July 1, 1867 is what Canadians consider the founding of their country, with the union of four provinces: Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Six provinces have joined the four original ones since 1867, the last one being Newfoundland in 1949.
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kangaroofarmer View Post
..Not too mention, I should have realised, That French Canadians, Have a different National celebration?
Well, a lot of people in Canada don't know (or only have a vague idea) that French Canadians have a different national celebration! And many also think that they shouldn't! But that's a whole other story...

Many French-speaking Canadians do take part in both June 24 and July 1 (a good excuse to take a week off work in between the two!), but generally the crowd numbers in Quebec are much, much larger for June 24.
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Old 06-09-2008, 11:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I don't think you offended anyone at all with your questions. No worries!

Newfoundland was actually a British dominion from 1907 until 1949, so the Royal Newfoundland Regiment would have been grouped together with the British forces. The RNR became part of the Canadian forces in 1949.

Canada outside Newfoundland also made a significant contribution to World War I. Actually, proportionately speaking its war effort in 1914-1918 was greater than in 1939-1945, though large numbers of Canadians fought in both wars.

Canadian troop and casualty figures for 1914-1918 are often grouped together with the "British Empire", as Canada only became officially independent in 1931 with the Statute of Westminster (at the same time as Australia and perhaps New Zealand? I may be wrong here...)

FYI - The 1931 Statute of Westminster is not really marked at all in Canada. July 1, 1867 is what Canadians consider the founding of their country, with the union of four provinces: Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Six provinces have joined the four original ones since 1867, the last one being Newfoundland in 1949.


Your correct, Australia and New Zealand also became independent, With the "Statute Of Westminster" in 1931, However we became a federation, On the January 1, 1901, When the six colonies, of Victoria, New South Wales, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania and Queensland, Were united.....Though we consider April 25, 1914, As the "Real" birth of the nation.

Australian deaths, Were also put under "British Empire" and our WW1 casualty number, Is also higher, Than in WW2 ...As in both wars, We were still the AIF, Australian Imperial Forces (A Volunteer Army), In 1947, We became the Australian Army.
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Old 06-09-2008, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kangaroofarmer View Post
Your correct, Australia and New Zealand also became independent, With the "Statute Of Westminster" in 1931, However we became a federation, On the January 1, 1901, When the six colonies, of Victoria, New South Wales, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania and Queensland, Were united.....Though we consider April 25, 1914, As the "Real" birth of the nation.

Australian deaths, Were also put under "British Empire" and our WW1 casualty number, Is also higher, Than in WW2 ...As in both wars, We were still the AIF, Australian Imperial Forces (A Volunteer Army), In 1947, We became the Australian Army.
Some Canadians (mostly historians) view the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1917

Battle of Vimy Ridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

in the same way Australians view Gallipoli (in "birth of a nation" terms), but so far the event has not yet entered public consciousness. Once again, talking about Vimy Ridge to many (if not a majority of) Canadians might draw a blank stare.
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Old 06-09-2008, 05:42 PM
 
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Thanks, Thats extremely good reading, Though I still don't understand why, It's not a more celebrated Canadian campign, As Gallipolli is almost Ground into us, To The point, Where the constant focus, Is often overbearing...Untill recently, Most of Australia's involvement on the "Western Front", Was largely unknown to the Public (We have a monument at Villers-Bretonneux).
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Old 06-10-2008, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Several reasons can explain why Canada doesn’t play up its military history (including Vimy) very much. First of all, it is right next door to a rather large country that does like to play up its military might, and as you probably know Canada is always keen on distinguishing itself from its neighbour to the south.

Second, the Canadian forces and their history are something of a uniting force in the English-speaking parts of the country, however, it is tough to carry this over into a coast-to-coast “pride” that encompasses the French-speaking population as well.

In Quebec in particular, the Canadian military is often seen as an English-only bastion that is hostile to and discriminated against French speakers. This was probably very much the case historically, and although things have improved greatly in recent decades, there are still periodically French-English issues in the military even today.

Along these same lines, another problem related to Canada’s participation in the two World Wars is the fact that each war sparked its own political “conscription crisis” between English and French speaking Canada.

In both cases, public opinion in English-speaking Canada was largely in favour of mandatory enrolment (conscription), whereas in French-speaking Canada opinion was against. Anglo-Canada (where the population was generally of more recent implantation from the UK) was very much in favour of defending glorious Britain and its King, whereas there was no such sentiment vis-à-vis France among the French-speaking population, whose ancestors generally came here in the 1600s. Since the English population was larger than the French, conscription was brought in and all young men were subject to it, regardless of what language they spoke.

So let’s just say there is still a historical malaise in Canada regarding the two World Wars, in spite of all the Canadian blood that was spilt during the two conflicts.

Couple this with the fact that Quebec is the most “peace and love”, left-leaning, progressive thinking, anti-war place in all of North America… well you get the picture.

Generally speaking, on the military side, it’s Canada’s peacekeeping efforts (actually quite significant and meritorious) over the past 50 years or so that are usually evoked to get everyone in the country on board to applaud our soldiers.
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Old 06-10-2008, 05:35 PM
 
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Oh okay, I understand now, Being close to America, Would make the role of Peacekeepers, A more Agreeable and Respectfull option.
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