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Old 02-26-2007, 11:57 AM
 
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what american cities do canadian cities correspond to...ie) similarities in culture/archetecture/population/infastructure. i thought this might be a fun topic and is not meant to "bash" either country...just to compare and contrast


for example, i think portland oregon is alot like vancouver bc because of the liberal pacific northwest culture and the size of their metros (2 million roughly). But vancouver is also like san francisco in that it has a high asian population and both cities are the "hippy nexus" of their respective nations. Thirdly vancouver is like honalulu and miami in that its skyline is composed of mainly highrise modern condo towers not office buildings. also vancouver compares to los angles in the fact that both are their respective nation's "hollywood". most canadian films are shot in vancouver and lion's gate film company is based there.

i would like to hear other people's comparisons and the reasons for them. i especially would like to here what people think is america's version of "quebec city" or "st johns newfoundland" and why

you are also welcome to compare small towns/rural areas in both nations
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Old 02-26-2007, 06:33 PM
j33
 
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I've heard a lot of Canadians say that Toronto is a lot like Chicago, but the lake is in the wrong place.
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Old 02-26-2007, 06:36 PM
 
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To me, I think Vancouver is a mix of San Francisco and San Diego. It has the liberal politics and urban culture of San Francisco, but physically, it looks more like San Diego. One reason may be the proliferation of Vancouverism condos in downtown San Diego -- and with the downtown on the water, San Diego looks like Vancouver 15 years ago, in my opinion. Portland, on the other hand, is a slower paced place than Vancouver.

St. John's, Newfoundland.... try Duluth, Minnesota. Similar population, similar aged city, laid out along the water (Lake Superior is very rocky as well). To me, that's somewhat of a close match.

Quebec City has no real parallel -- perhaps Boston to an extent from a physical point of view, but not in any other way. Honestly.. I'd say New Orleans (pre-Katrina) has a lot in similar with Quebec City and Montreal -- good nightlife, French-based culture, good food, etc.

Other comparisons...

Calgary -- Houston. Physically, it is located like Denver, but culturally, I see more of Houston -- oil, cowboys, diverse, everything seems big.

Edmonton -- Kansas City. Similar feel in many ways.

Regina -- Wichita. Again, these two cities just feel like twins -- agricultural areas, similar sized, similar feel.

Saskatoon -- Fargo or Lincoln, Nebraska. Lincoln is also the state capital, so it's not a direct comparison, yet Saskatoon is more signficant in the national eye than Fargo.

Winnipeg -- Minneapolis-St. Paul. Similar weather, similar feel to the place. Winnipeg and St. Paul look a lot alike, Minneapolis is totally different.

Toronto -- New York and Chicago. It functions as Canada's version of New York, has the same big-time approach, yet the layout of the city, climate, and location of downtown on a great lake suggest Chicago.

Ottawa -- Providence. Although Ottawa is Canada's capital, it's often thought of as a second-level size city in the region when it comes to influence, and it has similar architecture to Providence. I've never been to Ottawa -- love Providence though -- I might be out to lunch on this one.

Halifax -- Boston. Similar feel in many ways once again, even if Boston is much larger.

Any other suggestions?
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Old 02-26-2007, 07:06 PM
 
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wow hockeyfan, your post is incredable! you make good arguements! i agree with almost everything you said.

i also think portland maine is alot like its near neighbor, Saint John New Brunswick....similar size, similar skyline shape and height. maritime anglo-saxon culture. they are almsot twins

i also think duluth is alot like thunder bay, ON...very close in distance and size...both rugged superior ports...but duluth probably has more norwegians and lutherans.

also i think calgary is more like dallas than houston if we are going for the texas comparison. Houston is a bayou city, while dallas is more of a dusty great plains city like calgary. but size-wise, calgary is more like salt lake city, just with bigger towers. Actually, calgary's skyline looks a bit like minneapolis with its 1990s/2000s era towers. dallas and houston are both pretty much stuck in 1983...so is denver (not a single new office tower since 83 or 84)

i also think that the canadian maritimes are canada's closest thing to dixie (the american south). firstly, both regions have strong celtic backgrounds (the scots in nova scotia, the scots-irish in the southern states). both cultures have fiddles in their traditional music.

Both regions have inhabitants that are seen as uneducated rural simpletons by the rest of their respective nations (of course these are just stereotypes).

also, both regions have accents and slang very distinct from the rest of their respective nations.

Both regions are poorer than the average state/province in their countries and halifax, NS has (by canadian standards) a very old and large black community (canada's answer to the deep south's historic "black belt").

Lastly, studies have shown that maritime canadians, not albertans are canada's most Christian people, like the american southerners. Most canadians don't think this about maritimers because unlike albertans, they are not fiscally conservative and believe in welfare and medicare. But they are nonetheless very traditional compared to other canucks and have banned sunday shopping until recently in NS.

what do you guys think?
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Old 02-26-2007, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,440 posts, read 28,610,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
what american cities do canadian cities correspond to...ie) similarities in culture/archetecture/population/infastructure. i thought this might be a fun topic and is not meant to "bash" either country...just to compare and contrast


for example, i think portland oregon is alot like vancouver bc because of the liberal pacific northwest culture and the size of their metros (2 million roughly). But vancouver is also like san francisco in that it has a high asian population and both cities are the "hippy nexus" of their respective nations. Thirdly vancouver is like honalulu and miami in that its skyline is composed of mainly highrise modern condo towers not office buildings. also vancouver compares to los angles in the fact that both are their respective nation's "hollywood". most canadian films are shot in vancouver and lion's gate film company is based there.

i would like to hear other people's comparisons and the reasons for them. i especially would like to here what people think is america's version of "quebec city" or "st johns newfoundland" and why

you are also welcome to compare small towns/rural areas in both nations
Montreal-NYC. Huge ethnic diversity, very intense, culturally rich as all hell, great nightlife (albeit Montreal might have the edge over NY right now), very much on the edge, places where you feel alive all the time.
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Old 02-27-2007, 09:24 PM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
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I've heard Toronto described as "New York, if it were run by the Swiss" just due to their shared status as their nation's "premier" city, a multicultural nexus of finance, fashion, and the arts, but with Toronto seemingly far cleaner, more orderly and a seemingly less frenetic pace of life.

I agree with most of what HockeyFan says.

I've always felt that Calgary was very similar to Denver, especially in regards to the look and layout of the city, although it has retained a bit more of the "Wild West" demeanor than Denver has, but still, the landscape, the massive growth in population, the housing, etc. is all very similar to Denver, but without really the Latino influence that Denver has taken on in recent years.

I think Boston and Montreal are somewhat similar. Actually, Montreal is almost like a mishmash of Boston and New Orleans to me. You have the obvious French influences, with the wrought-iron balconies and cafe culture of New Orleans' French Quarter, but also a teeming modern downtown of glass and steel with a large population of young students (Boston).

Last edited by dullnboring; 02-27-2007 at 09:34 PM..
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Old 02-28-2007, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
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What U.S. city would you compare Windsor, Ontario to?

(i'm strainin' my brain tryin' to figure this one out)

Maybe Buffalo, N.Y.?
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Old 02-28-2007, 08:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
What U.S. city would you compare Windsor, Ontario to?

(i'm strainin' my brain tryin' to figure this one out)

Maybe Buffalo, N.Y.?
windsor...hmmm...maybe a half-sized toledo ohio.....similar skyline comprised of mostly 1970s and 1980s medium towers spread in a linear fashion accross the waterfront..

seriously windsor hamilton and oshawa could be "anytown midwestern usa" all three are industrial-age rustbelt cities...however windsor and hamilton still have pretty vibrant downtowns compared to similar sized american rustbelt towns.....not so much oshawa, could be erie, pa or lima oh with less black people.
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Old 02-28-2007, 05:12 PM
 
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For Hamilton, I go with a smaller Philadelphia. A city close to a larger city, and has some suburbs that are becoming commuter areas to the nearby larger, more expensive city. Also, both cities are often overlooked, but offer a lot in their own right. Philadelphia has the cheese steak, Hamilton has Tim Horton's (original location)! And the rabid Ti-Cat fans in Hamilton fit into Philadelphia's sports image. Pittsburgh is the obvious choice, but apart from steel, I think Philadelphia is a better comparison.

Windsor... that's a tougher one. I'd go with a smaller Buffalo, for the location on the border and somewhat in the shadow of a larger city on the other side.

Also, I'm going with London, Ontario and Hartford, Conn. as similar cities. Both are white-collar cities located between larger cities (Boston/NYC and Toronto/Detroit), both are insurance centers, and both have attempted to revitalize the downtown around arenas (the JLC in London looks great).
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Old 05-19-2007, 05:03 PM
 
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i posted this thread a few monthes back and as you can see, there was'nt too many responses, but seeing as these days, there is so much heated discussion on fringe issues such as "where does the south start?" or "are the plains midwestern?", i thought this would be a good time to revive another fringe topic
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