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Old 06-11-2016, 07:43 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
87,821 posts, read 81,562,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stockyman View Post
Basically my mother is turning 77 this year and has no history with colon cancer in the family. However in the most recent physical where she had to give a stool sample there was a hint of blood, which led my family doctor to recommend a specialist who made an appointment to do a colonoscopy this month. I suspect there was blood because my mother suffers from constipation and prior to giving the stool sample she forced herself to go which caused her to bleed quite a bit. After that though, there's been no blood whatsoever.

The problem is my mother's mental and physical health has declined late last year and if this scheduled colonoscopy had occurred before all her other problems she would not have hesitated to do this procedure. She's not sure if she can fast the day before and does not want to take the prescriptions to make her empty out her colon. She finds the procedure too difficult because of her current health. She does not want her to go but the doctor and specialist want her in cause there's a health problem.

Should I force her to go or let her cancel? I'm worried on the day of the procedure she will flat out cancel. She's mentioned that she might. On the one hand I don't really think she has any type of colon cancer but I'd hate myself if there was an actual problem that the colonoscopy could find.

She's an adult but my mother and her reasoning is not 100% logical at the moment. Not sure what I should do. I've read that colonoscopies can be hard on very elderly people and useless after age 75.

What should I do?
Hemorhoids can cause blood in the stool, too. IDK, I wouldn't worry about it, if that's the only reason the doc recommended the procedure. He could easily check to see if there was any tearing or any hemorrhoids without putting her through and expensive and difficult procedure and prep. You could ask the doc to do that, explaining that you'd like to make sure there are no other potential causes for the blood before putting your mother through the colonoscopy. He should be doing that as a routine check during her annual exam, anyway. It sounds like he's being lazy. If he refuses, consider finding another doctor, if your mother would be ok with that.
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Old 06-12-2016, 12:59 AM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,743,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stockyman View Post

What should I do?
I'm not going to read multiple pages of posts, so I'll have to take the risk of repeating.

Since she suffers constipation, and if the blood you saw was fresh, then it's likely hemorroids. And her doctor should be able to examine her in his office himself (mine did). They can spot the 'rroids inside the rectum. Did he not offer to do this???????

Not all, but many gastroenterologists put their patients under for the procedure. I don't understand why some don't, because the procedure is very uncomfortable, which makes me wonder how the sphincter can relax. But she shouldn't have anything to fear if she's under anesthesia. The worst of it is would be the preparation the night before (and I agree with the other posters that this could be very difficult at her age. Sounds like she's on the brink of preferring to eat glass rather than agree to this procedure, so I wouldn't force it on her.
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Old 06-12-2016, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,335 posts, read 1,488,376 times
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First off, I'm 54 and definitely have been delaying getting a colonascopy. (sp)

Fear of complications, not wanting to do the prep, and setting aside the time if and when I might break down and commit.

I want to thank each and everyone who took the time to share tips, links, and their personal thoughts both pro and con.

Because of all the information Y'all shared I will commit and do the procedure.

Regards,
Shh
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Old 06-12-2016, 10:27 AM
 
4,948 posts, read 17,324,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shh1313 View Post
First off, I'm 54 and definitely have been delaying getting a colonascopy. (sp)

Fear of complications, not wanting to do the prep, and setting aside the time if and when I might break down and commit.

I want to thank each and everyone who took the time to share tips, links, and their personal thoughts both pro and con.

Because of all the information Y'all shared I will commit and do the procedure.

Regards,
Shh
I did 2 and the 2nd one the prep was not too bad and they put you to sleep so you get a real nice rest.

Eat light for a few days b4 and it will make it easier. Also baby wipes may be good to have on hand with a good book.
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Old 06-12-2016, 01:47 PM
 
16,380 posts, read 19,652,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
This is how I feel also. My stepfather died from complications of a colonoscopy when his bowel was punctured. Plus there have been many warnings about people getting infections from the equipment they use which is impossible to sterilize and is used over and over again.

I'm 61, have never had one and never will. It's just another money maker for the doctors. Older people seem to get constipated a lot which would account for the slight blood in the stool. If there is no history of colon cancer in your family then leave her alone to make her own decision.
An elderly friend of mine got lightheaded, fell and hit his head in the shower when he was fasting as part of the preparation for a colonoscopy. He had permanent balance problems after that due to hitting his head. He was lightheaded because he hadn't eaten, as part of the colonoscopy prep.
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Old 06-12-2016, 02:05 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,544 posts, read 2,385,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
What appears to be lost in the discussion here is an understanding of what colon cancer does. It's not just that it may spread and cause pain that could be treated with palliative measures and narcotics. It ultimately blocks the colon so that fecal material cannot be eliminated. At that point, either the patient has a much more invasive surgical procedure, even if it is just a colostomy to divert feces before getting to the obstruction, or the patient dies an agonizing death.

It's not like the patient just goes to sleep and does not wake up.

Again, we are not talking about a screening procedure. The colonoscopy for the lady in the OP is diagnostic and potentially could be therapeutic.
Dying of any cancer is an agonizing death. Morphine helps a lot.
Personally, I would not force a woman who is already in declining health to prolong her life doing procedures.
When my elderly Mom was diagnosed with cancer, she had the option of having some surgery to prolong her life 3 or 4 months. She refused, and I agreed with her decision, which was also her doctor's recommendation. It probably would have taken her 3 or 4 months, or longer, to recover from the surgery, if she ever did.
I don't know how old you are Suzy, but advancing age may give you a better understanding of why older people make the choices we do.
We all have to die one day. At some point, many make the decision not to get treatment. In some states, doctor assisted suicide is allowed, so people don't have to die prolonged and agonizing deaths of cancer.
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Old 06-12-2016, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
30,476 posts, read 32,885,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
Dying of any cancer is an agonizing death. Morphine helps a lot.
Personally, I would not force a woman who is already in declining health to prolong her life doing procedures.
When my elderly Mom was diagnosed with cancer, she had the option of having some surgery to prolong her life 3 or 4 months. She refused, and I agreed with her decision, which was also her doctor's recommendation. It probably would have taken her 3 or 4 months, or longer, to recover from the surgery, if she ever did.
I don't know how old you are Suzy, but advancing age may give you a better understanding of why older people make the choices we do.
We all have to die one day. At some point, many make the decision not to get treatment. In some states, doctor assisted suicide is allowed, so people don't have to die prolonged and agonizing deaths of cancer.
I am 68, Windwalker, with a family history of colon cancer.

The point I have been trying to make is that a death from an obstruction due to an untreated colon cancer is one of the very worst ways to go. Perhaps the lady we are discussing is so out of it that she would not even know what was happening, but that is not the impression I got from the OP, only that her health was declining. Best case with the colonoscopy is that she has hemorrhoids. She may just have a polyp. However, if there is a true cancer she can then make the decision whether to have a procedure that might prevent her becoming obstructed at some point. Despite what some others have said here, there is no way to know it's just hemorrhoids without taking a look.
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Old 06-12-2016, 07:31 PM
 
4,948 posts, read 17,324,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
I am 68, Windwalker, with a family history of colon cancer.

The point I have been trying to make is that a death from an obstruction due to an untreated colon cancer is one of the very worst ways to go. Perhaps the lady we are discussing is so out of it that she would not even know what was happening, but that is not the impression I got from the OP, only that her health was declining. Best case with the colonoscopy is that she has hemorrhoids. She may just have a polyp. However, if there is a true cancer she can then make the decision whether to have a procedure that might prevent her becoming obstructed at some point. Despite what some others have said here, there is no way to know it's just hemorrhoids without taking a look.
then others will know if it runs in the family to get it done. say no and hope for the best or do it
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Old 06-12-2016, 07:48 PM
 
4,948 posts, read 17,324,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
There's a lot of truth to this, esp from adults in their 40s or 50s who are used to supervising their own children, and they get the idea that they should do likewise for their parents who, in their own minds, are somehow less capable because they are not busy-busy in the workaday world any longer, and need a more 'responsible' person to make their decisions for them.

Quality of life is always a very personal matter, even to an elderly person. At the age of 77, your mother has already outlived the average person. Her prospects look good for age 80. Trying to force her to undergo something she doesn't feel comfortable with (assuming you could even do that) will result in what benefit, and to whom? It's not your decision to make.

I say this only because I am almost 69 years of age, and would not appreciate anyone doing such a thing to me!
Had 2 and no history but parents never had this done. I am high risk why polyps .

like it no but will do it again-
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Old 06-12-2016, 08:49 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
87,821 posts, read 81,562,175 times
Reputation: 91647
Quote:
Originally Posted by sware2cod View Post
An elderly friend of mine got lightheaded, fell and hit his head in the shower when he was fasting as part of the preparation for a colonoscopy. He had permanent balance problems after that due to hitting his head. He was lightheaded because he hadn't eaten, as part of the colonoscopy prep.
There's a separate colonoscopy prep for people with hypoglycemia and other blood-sugar issues. Anyone who thinks they may have a problem should ask about that.
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