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Old 06-05-2016, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
13,250 posts, read 7,349,616 times
Reputation: 20718

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
This is how I feel also. My stepfather died from complications of a colonoscopy when his bowel was punctured. Plus there have been many warnings about people getting infections from the equipment they use which is impossible to sterilize and is used over and over again.

I'm 61, have never had one and never will. It's just another money maker for the doctors. Older people seem to get constipated a lot which would account for the slight blood in the stool. If there is no history of colon cancer in your family then leave her alone to make her own decision.
You remind me of the guy who argued against seat belts by citing the rare instance when a person was flown from the car and survived as other who were buckled in died.

Colonoscopies have saved many more lives than they have cost.
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Old 06-05-2016, 06:55 AM
Status: "We're all broken, that's how the light gets in." (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
55,785 posts, read 44,151,488 times
Reputation: 78828
Oh - and as for the repeated (and amen'ed) comment about "why does the medical community subject elderly people to so many procedures just to prolong their miserable lives - it's a scam" comment:

I don't know about any of you, but I have yet to meet an elderly person who still didn't cling to life till death became inevitable. My 84 year old grandmother was diagnosed with cancer that had spread all over her body - breast, then lungs, and finally bones and brain. (She didn't like going to the doctor, so by the time she finally went, it was too late.) She was told that her condition was terminal and that treatment should be palliative. I will never forget how mad that made her. She said, "I'm Scots Irish - we were made to fight. I want to fight this and beat it." Her medical team therefore - at her insistence - did more radiation than they had originally suggested, but they refused to do surgery, which made her even madder. I think she went to her grave convinced that we had all just given up on her and let her die needlessly.

It never occurred to her that if she'd gone to the doctor a lot sooner, and taken advantage of the many screening options available to her (for instance, mammograms), they may have caught this cancer a LOT earlier and she'd have had that fighting chance. But she thought prescreening tests like mammograms were a scam.

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 06-05-2016 at 07:32 AM..
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Old 06-05-2016, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Florida
13,635 posts, read 6,727,655 times
Reputation: 27954
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
The FIT test checks for blood. A negative FIT test would be useless, since the OP's mom has already had bleeding and a positive stool test for blood.

The Cologuard is not intended to be used in someone known to have bleeding, either.

Both of those are screening tests to be used in someone with no symptoms. The OP's mom needs a diagnosis, not more screening.




Constipation does not commonly cause bleeding. There is no way to know what is causing the bleeding without further diagnostic testing. The people who have had potentially cancerous polyps removed hardly consider the procedure "just a money maker." Treating a colon cancer is going to cost you a bunch more than having a polyp removed will.


I am tired of the mantra that docs "just want the fees" from the procedure. Apart from a few rogues, the vast, vast majority of physicians just want to help their patients. If a test is negative, that does not mean there was no indication to do it. No one of any age should have a test done without understanding why it is being done, and if nothing will be done if the test finds a problem, do not do the test.





Constipation in itself does not cause bleeding, however pushing to try and go to the bathroom can and does cause hemorrhoids or fissures which can bleed.


I think it is more than just wanting the fees, however colonoscopies are a big money maker for gastro doctors; it's also a matter of doctors wanting to cover their azzes so they don't get sued; THAT is the big reason for a lot of unnecessary tests.
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Old 06-05-2016, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Florida
13,635 posts, read 6,727,655 times
Reputation: 27954
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
You remind me of the guy who argued against seat belts by citing the rare instance when a person was flown from the car and survived as other who were buckled in died.

Colonoscopies have saved many more lives than they have cost.



And I'm certainly not telling anybody not to get one just because I won't have one.


And BTW my ex-husband was one of those people who survived a crash because he DIDN'T have a seatbelt on. However I wear mine. You're comparing apples and oranges.


Too many people think doctors are demi-gods and always have the patient's best interests at heart. I've been at the receiving end of incompetent doctors too many times to blindly do everything they tell me.
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Old 06-05-2016, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
13,250 posts, read 7,349,616 times
Reputation: 20718
I'm with Katheryn. This is the 3rd deadliest form of cancer in this country and it's 90% preventible.. The amount of ignorance displayed in this thread is really sad. It is amazing to me that people avoid this procedure because they feel it's a scam. It's a fact that early detection results in a much higher survival rate.

One poster with a family history said no way due to dehydration. Let's see: dehydration vs one of the the worst deaths imaginable. Yeah tough call there.
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Old 06-05-2016, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
13,250 posts, read 7,349,616 times
Reputation: 20718
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
And I'm certainly not telling anybody not to get one just because I won't have one.


And BTW my ex-husband was one of those people who survived a crash because he DIDN'T have a seatbelt on. However I wear mine. You're comparing apples and oranges..

Your experience does not change the fact that the poster I was responding to used the rare example of his/her step father dieing as a result of complications during the proecdure as the reason for not doing it. Why else would that poster bother with the story? Like the seat belt analogy the poster is using the exception to the rule to form their opinion as if this is the norm and not the rare exception. So my seat belt analogy is on point, it's the exact same twisted logic of not doing something that has proven to save lives base on one rare incident when it cost a life.
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Old 06-05-2016, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
9,253 posts, read 5,501,986 times
Reputation: 24219
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
When the directions are followed, most of the time the "bathroom run" is over by eight or nine PM.
And here's another bit of advice which might make the prep easier for the OP's mom: don't follow the prep directions.

Now before everybody gets up in arms with me, understand that the typical prep directions are written assuming the patient is a working person who understandably doesn't want to be running for the john every five minutes while at work. The directions also assume the person isn't willing to make any dietary changes prior to starting the prep.

And remember the ultimate goal of the prep: to get all the stool out of the colon, so the gastroenterologist can see and remove any polyps.

The OP's mom is a retiree. There's no reason why she couldn't start the prep in the morning instead of the evening, so all the bathroom dashes happen during the day. She just has to stay on clear liquids (no red, blue, or purple ones, though), once she starts the prep. She can go NPO at bedtime. If the colonoscopy is scheduled for the morning, she won't have to be NPO for very long.

Also, if she starts a light, minimal-residue diet and begins to drink plenty of fluids several days before the colonoscopy is scheduled, the prep will be easier. The less stool there is in the colon, the less stool has to come out, and the faster the prep goes.

When I have a colonoscopy (I've had two to date, and will need them every five years or so for the rest of my life), I insist on a Monday morning time slot, and I start the prep on Saturday. It means two days of a clear liquid diet, but it also means I'm not trying to force myself to down more liquids in a short period than I can tolerate. (And I can't drink the salty prep at all; it's Miralax in Gatoraid plus a few Dulcolax tablets for me.). I also switch to a light diet around Wednesday. It makes things a lot easier.

If the OP's mom's worries about the prep are the only reason she doesn't want to do the colonoscopy, she should talk to the gastroenterologist and discuss ways of making the process safer and more bearable for her. Colonoscopy prep isn't one-size-fits-all!
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Old 06-05-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
19,096 posts, read 20,283,828 times
Reputation: 48919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
And here's another bit of advice which might make the prep easier for the OP's mom: don't follow the prep directions.

Now before everybody gets up in arms with me, understand that the typical prep directions are written assuming the patient is a working person who understandably doesn't want to be running for the john every five minutes while at work. The directions also assume the person isn't willing to make any dietary changes prior to starting the prep.

And remember the ultimate goal of the prep: to get all the stool out of the colon, so the gastroenterologist can see and remove any polyps.

The OP's mom is a retiree. There's no reason why she couldn't start the prep in the morning instead of the evening, so all the bathroom dashes happen during the day. She just has to stay on clear liquids (no red, blue, or purple ones, though), once she starts the prep. She can go NPO at bedtime. If the colonoscopy is scheduled for the morning, she won't have to be NPO for very long.

Also, if she starts a light, minimal-residue diet and begins to drink plenty of fluids several days before the colonoscopy is scheduled, the prep will be easier. The less stool there is in the colon, the less stool has to come out, and the faster the prep goes.

When I have a colonoscopy (I've had two to date, and will need them every five years or so for the rest of my life), I insist on a Monday morning time slot, and I start the prep on Saturday. It means two days of a clear liquid diet, but it also means I'm not trying to force myself to down more liquids in a short period than I can tolerate. (And I can't drink the salty prep at all; it's Miralax in Gatoraid plus a few Dulcolax tablets for me.). I also switch to a light diet around Wednesday. It makes things a lot easier.

If the OP's mom's worries about the prep are the only reason she doesn't want to do the colonoscopy, she should talk to the gastroenterologist and discuss ways of making the process safer and more bearable for her. Colonoscopy prep isn't one-size-fits-all!
Excellent points.
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Old 06-05-2016, 10:26 AM
 
Location: State of Waiting
615 posts, read 843,244 times
Reputation: 1458
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
The doctors would not suggest an examination of the bone marrow without an indication to do it, and many people with cancer have no family history of it. Not all cancers are heritable; many happen by what appears to be chance. An MRI would not be ordered just because of constipation, so I suspect there were additional signs or symptoms that caused concern. I find it difficult to understand how an MRI harms someone and causes "constant pain". MRIs do not hurt, though some people find it hard to be in the machine because of claustrophobia - and there are open machines that help with that.

I am tired of the mantra that docs "just want the fees" from the procedure. Apart from a few rogues, the vast, vast majority of physicians just want to help their patients. If a test is negative, that does not mean there was no indication to do it. No one of any age should have a test done without understanding why it is being done, and if nothing will be done if the test finds a problem, do not do the test.

It sounds to me like you and your mother's doctors did not communicate very well and you do not understand the reasons for the tests she had done.
ACTUALLY my Mom had osteoporosis and was unable lie completely flat in the MRI bed. I heard her screaming -- I was in the room--- insisted for the manager of the clinic to come, we stopped several times before actually starting the MRI. The techs kept trying to straighten her out... Seriously this happened, in Metro DC. The *only* reason I permitted them to proceed was because her doctor at the time insisted it was necessary. Yeah, right. At 92.

I certainly DO understand everything that my Mom went through. I was there and in communication with the doctors constantly. Take my post for the brief outline it was, because I'm not going into MORE of the entire story on this page.
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Old 06-05-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
4,210 posts, read 4,688,270 times
Reputation: 7848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
And here's another bit of advice which might make the prep easier for the OP's mom: don't follow the prep directions.

Now before everybody gets up in arms with me, understand that the typical prep directions are written assuming the patient is a working person who understandably doesn't want to be running for the john every five minutes while at work. The directions also assume the person isn't willing to make any dietary changes prior to starting the prep.

And remember the ultimate goal of the prep: to get all the stool out of the colon, so the gastroenterologist can see and remove any polyps.

The OP's mom is a retiree. There's no reason why she couldn't start the prep in the morning instead of the evening, so all the bathroom dashes happen during the day. She just has to stay on clear liquids (no red, blue, or purple ones, though), once she starts the prep. She can go NPO at bedtime. If the colonoscopy is scheduled for the morning, she won't have to be NPO for very long.

Also, if she starts a light, minimal-residue diet and begins to drink plenty of fluids several days before the colonoscopy is scheduled, the prep will be easier. The less stool there is in the colon, the less stool has to come out, and the faster the prep goes.

When I have a colonoscopy (I've had two to date, and will need them every five years or so for the rest of my life), I insist on a Monday morning time slot, and I start the prep on Saturday. It means two days of a clear liquid diet, but it also means I'm not trying to force myself to down more liquids in a short period than I can tolerate. (And I can't drink the salty prep at all; it's Miralax in Gatoraid plus a few Dulcolax tablets for me.). I also switch to a light diet around Wednesday. It makes things a lot easier.

If the OP's mom's worries about the prep are the only reason she doesn't want to do the colonoscopy, she should talk to the gastroenterologist and discuss ways of making the process safer and more bearable for her. Colonoscopy prep isn't one-size-fits-all!
I started a low residue diet a week before the colonoscopy, mostly liquid two days before and the Miralax in Gatoraid + dulcolax the day before. Did you drink the Miralax in Gatoraid + dulcolax tabs two days before the procedure ?
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