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Old 06-19-2011, 07:31 PM
 
8,445 posts, read 16,071,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post

Looks mainly like a bunch of trolling to me, but whatever. Guess it worked. Whatever gets it up for you.
Yep yep. I wasn't going to get involved at all until I read the silly comment about how outside ANYTHING is going to be more athletic than an inside ANYTHING......then I got sucked in, goshdarnitall. LOL
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Old 06-19-2011, 07:42 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 17,042,016 times
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Many indoor cats are understimulated and inactive - cats are natural predators, carnivores and hunters. But....as long as the owners provide plenty of stimulation and play and room, I don't see why indoor cats would be any less in-shape; after all cats spend upwards of 20 hours a day sleeping.

My four cats go in and out at will (I live in a dead-end road, semi-rural area with woods around me and YES they are all neutered, vaccinated, etc) and are all reformed stray/street cats. I am happy they are able to climb trees and stalk mice and critters in the woods and bugs in the yard....but to be honest they spend most of their time either inside, or sleeping on the front porch. In fact three of the four are sacked out on the cat pillows on my front porch as I type.
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Old 06-19-2011, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 22,906,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post
Yep yep. I wasn't going to get involved at all until I read the silly comment about how outside ANYTHING is going to be more athletic than an inside ANYTHING......then I got sucked in, goshdarnitall. LOL
Well, or maybe it didn't really work that well, as it's been a relatively level-headed discussion after all.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:49 PM
 
926 posts, read 2,112,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
At my house, yes, the outdoor cat was more active. My cats lived on 3 acres of privacy (no cars, dogs etc)..the door would open and out they would go....running as FAST as possible, running up trees, or even in circles, just so happy to be out and about and active.

Well NOW, we moved to a townhome...so I am making an effort to play with them and provide distractions...they chase each other etc. but 2 have gained a significant amt of wt in one month. I let them out when I can consistently be out with them and watch, but not comfortable with this.
You see this makes a lot of sense to me. The outdoor cats have plentiful energy and space to stretch their legs, just like cats do in the wild (think pumas, lions, tigers). I'll bet that if they were given a blood test, their cholesterol levels would be lower than an indoor cat who simply cannot cover the same distance and get the same amount of fresh air than an outdoor cat would get. I also think indoor cats' cholesterol levels are higher than those who get regular outdoor exercise - I'm not a vet but when I compare to myself, my doctor said to eat and exercise more so it's only logical the same principle would apply to felines.

Not only do I think outdoor cats get more physical exercise, but they have more mental exercise too. I don't know about you but as protective as I understood cat owners to be, I feel that keeping the cat indoors is limiting their potential and is just like a prison. It's not quite as bad as solitary confinement in human prisons, but there is so much more stimulation outside. The birds, the squirrels, the trees, the stairs, more legs to rub up against, etc. you get the idea. In short, I wonder if pound per pound, an outdoor cat has more muscle while an indoor cat has more fat.

By the way - I don't have a cat myself but I see them daily roaming the alleys behind my home and let me tell you, their agility as athletes really impresses me.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:51 PM
 
8,445 posts, read 16,071,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
You see this makes a lot of sense to me. The outdoor cats have plentiful energy and space to stretch their legs, just like cats do in the wild (think pumas, lions, tigers). I'll bet that if they were given a blood test, their cholesterol levels would be lower than an indoor cat who simply cannot cover the same distance and get the same amount of fresh air than an outdoor cat would get.

Not only do I think outdoor cats get more physical exercise, but they have more mental exercise too. I don't know about you but as protective as I understood cat owners to be, I feel that keeping the cat indoors is limiting their potential and is just like a prison.
Somehow I knew that would be coming, LOL!

How many cats do you have?
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Old 06-19-2011, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,036 posts, read 9,563,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
You see this makes a lot of sense to me. The outdoor cats have plentiful energy and space to stretch their legs, just like cats do in the wild (think pumas, lions, tigers). I'll bet that if they were given a blood test, their cholesterol levels would be lower than an indoor cat who simply cannot cover the same distance and get the same amount of fresh air than an outdoor cat would get. I also think indoor cats' cholesterol levels are higher than those who get regular outdoor exercise - I'm not a vet but when I compare to myself, my doctor said to eat and exercise more so it's only logical the same principle would apply to felines.

Not only do I think outdoor cats get more physical exercise, but they have more mental exercise too. I don't know about you but as protective as I understood cat owners to be, I feel that keeping the cat indoors is limiting their potential and is just like a prison. It's not quite as bad as solitary confinement in human prisons, but there is so much more stimulation outside. The birds, the squirrels, the trees, the stairs, more legs to rub up against, etc. you get the idea. In short, I wonder if pound per pound, an outdoor cat has more muscle while an indoor cat has more fat.

By the way - I don't have a cat myself but I see them daily roaming the alleys behind my home and let me tell you, their agility as athletes really impresses me.
You are trying to rationalize your own opinion that outdoor cats are more athletic and/or healthier than indoor cats, which is not an argument that you can make. As I previously stated, there are pros and cons to being an indoor cat and there are pros and cons to being an outdoor cat.

Moreover, cats are not humans. The idea of comparing "cholesterol levels" in cats to those in humans is ridiculous; these are two completely different animals with completely different physiological makeups.

Furthermore, as others have stated, there are many lean indoor cats; everything depends on how active they are, how much their owners play with them, etc. You are also insisting that outdoor cats are active all of the time while outside, which simply isn't true, especially if they are outside during the day. Most sleep outside the same as they would if they were indoors b/c they are still primarily nocturnal.

However, all of this has already been stated very sensibly by other posters, myself included. And, yet, you still seem convinced of your preliminary hypothesis. I think this is the point at which you provide some sources other than your opinion to back up your claim.
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Old 06-19-2011, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 22,906,896 times
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Ah, yes. In the end it always comes down to stirring the outdoor vs indoor debate. "I don't have a cat, but surely keeping it inside is a prison." Bee. Ess.

Year for year and cat for cat, an indoor cat lives longer and healthier. Period. End of story. What else is actually relevant?

How athletic were the 3 cats I saw by the side of the road killed, all within a few miles of each other, over a single 24-hour period this weekend? Probably very. Does it really matter?

You can't frame this as the same issue with humans. But even if you did, are gymnasts not athletic? Do they need to go outside?

Are you happy now? Will you go away now that you've stirred up a stern enough post? Here's hoping.

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Old 06-19-2011, 11:45 PM
 
926 posts, read 2,112,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
Moreover, cats are not humans. The idea of comparing "cholesterol levels" in cats to those in humans is ridiculous; these are two completely different animals with completely different physiological makeups.
I understand that cats have 4 legs while we have 2 legs and 2 arms, so we're different physiologically in a that respect. But let me just get to the bottom line of why I posted this thread and just brought up the cholesterol thing.
Have you ever heard of people dying of heart failure due to lack of exercise, obesity, being couch potatoes, having a poor diet, etc. Have you ever heard of cats dying of heart failure for the same reasons?

I think you'd probably say yes to both. So when my doctor told me to exercise more and eat better, I wondered if the same thing applied to cats and if outdoor cats would have less incidence of heart disease due to their athletic bodies. I'm actually considering adopting a cat in the future (I'm more of a dog person but it's impractical in the city) , so I'd like to hear from cat owners (CD peeps) about the role they think exercise has in a cat's long life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
Year for year and cat for cat, an indoor cat lives longer and healthier. Period. End of story.
Do you have any scientific sources to back up this claim that they are healthier? When I think of the cats I pet sitted for in the past with their fat rolls and lazy demeanor, I can't imagine that they were in peak form living a "healthy" life.
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Old 06-19-2011, 11:57 PM
 
8,445 posts, read 16,071,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
I understand that cats have 4 legs while we have 2 legs and 2 arms, so we're different physiologically in a that respect. But let me just get to the bottom line of why I posted this thread and just brought up the cholesterol thing.
Have you ever heard of people dying of heart failure due to lack of exercise, obesity, being couch potatoes, having a poor diet, etc. Have you ever heard of cats dying of heart failure for the same reasons?

I think you'd probably say yes to both. So when my doctor told me to exercise more and eat better, I wondered if the same thing applied to cats and if outdoor cats would have less incidence of heart disease due to their athletic bodies. I'm actually considering adopting a cat in the future (I'm more of a dog person but it's impractical in the city) , so I'd like to hear from cat owners (CD peeps) about the role they think exercise has in a cat's long life.
So now you've gone from sparking to looking for advice? Okay, first, the city is no place to make a cat live outside.

Many outdoor cats don't live long enough to know whether they would ever develop heart disease.

It is the human's responsibility to see that the cat gets enough exercise (and proper diet) to keep them healthy.

It is also part of the joy of living with said cat, playing with him/her every day. Interactive games are good for both mental and physical stimulation, and help develop the bond between human and cat. Also helps develop the cat's personality. And brings much laughter to the human, which is very good for humans!

The more you play with your cat, the more s/he will play by her/himself. The more attention you pay to your cat, the more the cat's personality will be developed. If your cat is outside all the time (as you clarified earlier you are not talking about indoor/outdoor cats, but cats who live outside), what is the point of having the cat?

A cat's brain is arranged most like humans of any animal, especially the emotional center. Cats are social animals. Cats form deep emotional bonds with their humans, as long as the humans work toward developing those bonds.

A cat needs things to climb and jump on, height is more important than space. Cats are sprinters, they do not need to run long distances to get proper exercise. Cat trees, cat shelves, and interactive games, and proper diet, will keep the cat moving and fit, both physically and mentally.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:35 AM
 
Location: El Paso, TX
2,806 posts, read 7,118,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
I'm actually considering adopting a cat in the future (I'm more of a dog person but it's impractical in the city) , so I'd like to hear from cat owners (CD peeps) about the role they think exercise has in a cat's long life.
So you'd like to adopt a cat just so you can stick it outside 24/7? What's the point? Why not just enjoy watching the "athletic" alley cats in your neighborhood? Leave the adopting to people who will be loving, responsible, and attentive. And please educate yourself on an animal before you decide to take one in...from your posts it's clear you know very little about cats in general. Do you actually think the neighborhood alley cats will buddy up to a cat you adopt if you stick him out there? NEWSFLASH: They'll tear him apart, probably kill him unless a car, sadistic human, or poison gets him first. You won't have to worry about the cat getting high cholesterol because it will probably die in a matter of days .
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