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Old 06-20-2011, 10:04 AM
 
926 posts, read 2,113,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Cat longevity is related to how they are kept, with indoor cats living longer. A study of free-roaming cats found that 75% of these cats died before reaching one year of age, and only 6% reached 3 years of age. The main causes of mortality were vehicles, disease, humans and dogs.[/i]

Free Roaming, Owned Cats (http://www.avma.org/issues/policy/comments/ofc_free_roaming.asp - broken link)
Thanks for the link Wilson513, but I noticed you excluded some key words from the article you quoted. The statistic refers to free-roaming farm-associated cats, therefore those who live in the countryside. I live in a the city and was referring to urban cats.

Also I'm not sure why you think it's okay to attack me with the troll comment, did you know doing that is a TOS violation? I should know, I've been suspended for that in the past and have learned my lesson.

Back on topic, while I understand there are inherent risks involved with letting an urban cat roam free, I still believe what doctors say about the important of a good diet and sufficient exercise. Vets are doctors too and I also read on petmd.com about cat cholesterol, the causes, treatments, etc. Wouldn't you agree that it's better for someone to post here who wants to learn about the ins and outs of animal health than it is for someone to go out and buy/adopt a feline without all the information at hand? Sorry if I seem ignorant to you, I'm just trying to learn.
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Old 06-20-2011, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 22,919,585 times
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Perils in the Life of an Outdoor Cat (http://www.runway.net/b/moonmaid/in-or-out.html - broken link)

http://www.chittendenhumane.org/asse...0Statement.pdf

http://www.indiana-paw.com/pdfs/ptp-catsinout.pdf (broken link)

http://www.richmondspca.org/document.doc?id=108 BTW, why it's called "Dumb Friends League", cos you're wondering About Dumb Friends League | Dumb Friends League

http://www.ucrcats.com/wp-content/up...s.-outdoor.pdf

MSPCA-Angell: The Not So Great Outdoors for Cats (http://support.mspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=petowners_art_int_Outdoors_for _Cats - broken link)

Should You Let Your Cat Go Outside? (Actually cites Childs, Ross, 1986, a study that focused on cat deaths by automobile)

For those who actually want info on why to keep a cat inside.
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Old 06-20-2011, 11:53 AM
 
8,456 posts, read 16,090,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post

Back on topic, while I understand there are inherent risks involved with letting an urban cat roam free, I still believe what doctors say about the important of a good diet and sufficient exercise. Vets are doctors too and I also read on petmd.com about cat cholesterol, the causes, treatments, etc. Wouldn't you agree that it's better for someone to post here who wants to learn about the ins and outs of animal health than it is for someone to go out and buy/adopt a feline without all the information at hand? Sorry if I seem ignorant to you, I'm just trying to learn.
See below:


Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post

Okay, first, the city is no place to make a cat live outside.

Many outdoor cats don't live long enough to know whether they would ever develop heart disease.

It is the human's responsibility to see that the cat gets enough exercise (and proper diet) to keep them healthy.

It is also part of the joy of living with said cat, playing with him/her every day. Interactive games are good for both mental and physical stimulation, and help develop the bond between human and cat. Also helps develop the cat's personality. And brings much laughter to the human, which is very good for humans!

The more you play with your cat, the more s/he will play by her/himself. The more attention you pay to your cat, the more the cat's personality will be developed. If your cat is outside all the time (as you clarified earlier you are not talking about indoor/outdoor cats, but cats who live outside), what is the point of having the cat?

A cat's brain is arranged most like humans of any animal, especially the emotional center. Cats are social animals. Cats form deep emotional bonds with their humans, as long as the humans work toward developing those bonds.

A cat needs things to climb and jump on, height is more important than space. Cats are sprinters, they do not need to run long distances to get proper exercise. Cat trees, cat shelves, and interactive games, and proper diet, will keep the cat moving and fit, both physically and mentally.
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Old 06-20-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 22,919,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Ignoring the OP, who is not bona fide, I wanted to mention that it is not at all well settled that exercise is even good for humans. There is a wave of enthusiasm over this for the past 20 years or so but the jury is still out. Does exercise improve cardio vascular health in individuals needing heart muscle exercise. Yes. But the longest living persons are not necessarily involved in exercise or even regular activity. Like cats, most people engaged in outdoor exercise have regular injuries. Is that a good thing?
A fair amount of longevity of a cat or human is hereditary. Some people can smoke cigarettes and live until 80. Some cats can go outside and live into their teens. Doesn't mean it's a good idea overall, on average.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:06 PM
 
18,845 posts, read 35,038,084 times
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Jasper and I vote to be indoor couch potatoes! Although he did do some cat yoga with me the other day. (Cayoga). Or Catoga...he wants to live a long, happy indoor life. It is cheaper for me, no costly vet bills on a cat that may have drunk bad water, my Mother's cat did that...she stated that it was okay to just let them out in the yard...cost her about $600 for his meds and care.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:42 PM
 
10,135 posts, read 25,575,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
A fair amount of longevity of a cat or human is hereditary. Some people can smoke cigarettes and live until 80. Some cats can go outside and live into their teens. Doesn't mean it's a good idea overall, on average.
I am sure that genetics is very important in cat longevity as it is with humans and dogs. It seems to me that people reflexively assume that exercise is good and sedation is bad. The truth is that some animals, humans included, get quite enough cardio vascular exercise from ordinary everyday activities. The exercise puts more miles on the heart muscle and subjects the animal to endless injuries. The injuries open up a whole other series of concerns impacting longevity: infection, stress, dormancy during recuperation, etc.

The whole issue about exercise is a lot more complicated that it seems at first glance.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Still on the southern high plains
14,887 posts, read 19,272,004 times
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There are too many variables to make generations about the health of indoor and outdoor pets but I am willing to bet money that if someone brought an indoor adult cat to my farm, and left them to sleep in my barns for a week like my three outdoor cats do, they would be coyote food within three days. My three cats were abandoned strays when I found them. They are as tough as an old army boot and very happy.
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Old 06-20-2011, 06:05 PM
 
926 posts, read 2,113,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
There are too many variables to make generations about the health of indoor and outdoor pets but I am willing to bet money that if someone brought an indoor adult cat to my farm, and left them to sleep in my barns for a week like my three outdoor cats do, they would be coyote food within three days. My three cats were abandoned strays when I found them. They are as tough as an old army boot and very happy.
Tough as an old army boot? LOL, so can they fight off coyotes that indoor cat owners seem so worried about? How do your farm cats do at the vet? I'm betting they get a clean bill of health with their muscular physiology and lightning fast reflexes.
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Old 06-20-2011, 07:20 PM
 
Location: El Paso, TX
2,806 posts, read 7,121,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
Tough as an old army boot? LOL, so can they fight off coyotes that indoor cat owners seem so worried about? How do your farm cats do at the vet? I'm betting they get a clean bill of health with their muscular physiology and lightning fast reflexes.
You don't live on a farm, you live in an urban setting. Apples and oranges. You're mind is obviously set that cats are better off outside no matter what kind of setting they'll be in...I don't believe you're here to "learn" as you've suggested, I believe you have an agenda here and want to convince people their cats are prisoners if they're being kept inside.

I have 3 cats, one of them 14 years old now, all in excellent physical condition, one in particular very athletically impressive. All have been indoors 100% of the time. How many outdoor cats live past 10...or even 5? The average lifespan for an outdoor cats is something like 2.5 years, so your concern about heart disease/cholesterol is really quite silly, considering the fact that your cat will most likely be killed long before anything like that would even be an issue.
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Old 06-20-2011, 07:42 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 17,049,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvmycat View Post
You don't live on a farm, you live in an urban setting. Apples and oranges. You're mind is obviously set that cats are better off outside no matter what kind of setting they'll be in...I don't believe you're here to "learn" as you've suggested, I believe you have an agenda here and want to convince people their cats are prisoners if they're being kept inside.

I have 3 cats, one of them 14 years old now, all in excellent physical condition, one in particular very athletically impressive. All have been indoors 100% of the time. How many outdoor cats live past 10...or even 5? The average lifespan for an outdoor cats is something like 2.5 years, so your concern about heart disease/cholesterol is really quite silly, considering the fact that your cat will most likely be killed long before anything like that would even be an issue.
I'll preface this by saying....I do agree that overall, an indoor cat has a longer lifespan, and I think indoor cats do great as long as thay are well-cared for. I also think that the OP's premise - that cats allowed free access outside are necessarily healthier and more athletic is flawed and noty backed up by any data. (I have read the OP's posts on another forum and s/he does seem to delight in stirring it up....)

However and yes I realise this sounds hypocritical, I have owned many indoor-outdoor cats over the last 40+ years (as in, they have access to the outdoors whenever they choose, in suburban, urban and rural areas) and have had several live to 15-20 years and beyond. My current four cats are all reformed strays...the oldest is (best guess) somewhere between 12-14 years old and I have had him now about seven years. He and the other three (ranging from a little under a year, 3 years, and at least 7 years old) are healthy and fit. My family (in a rural area) had a cat that lived to be very well into his 20s without ever a vet visit,and he chose not to come inside ever; he lived mostly in the barn and while we put food out for him he mostly ate what he hunted. When he was found dead, nobody could agree on whether he was 25, 26, 27....he was very old, though. Intact and never vaccinated, never once went to the vet. That cat had good genes.

On the other hand...Over the last seven years I have also had three "reformed strays" (cats I neutered, vaccinated, and that came in the house to eat or get warm or whatever) disappear without a trace.

I'm not really even a cat person I am a dog person, but have speutered and cared for many strays and some ferals over the years in places I've lived; sometimes the cats get along with the dogs and move in. So I am sort of casual about cat ownership I guess but I think I do more than a lot of people as far as caring for un-owned cats. Even the strays I feed get canned and grain-free kibble; the cats I consider "mine" get mostly commercial raw, some grain free kibble and canned, and are given whatever veterinary care/grooming/dental/parasite control/whatever I think necessary for their well-being.

However, I will say that based on my experience, generally speaking a well-cared for indoor cat is much more likely to outlive a cat with free roam of the outdoors, and all things being equal will be healthier. As long as they are fed good food (not Science Diet pellets and crap like that) and are provided with outlets for physical and mental stimulation and proper vet care when needed.
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