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Old 03-26-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,669 posts, read 66,997,888 times
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Let me preface this by explaining that I've been owned by cats all my life which is now over six decades. I've gone through just about everything in the book with the assortment who've passed through my doors and I've dealt with many issues of behavioral peeing, peeing because of infections, etc.

"Jessica" is a 12-13 year old "island Siamese" (a Heinz 57 variety) who's now the eldest of a household of five. She's well adjusted, loving and healthy and has in the past had a couple of incidents of behavioral peeing when a newcomer has joined the crowd but nothing that wasn't easily remedied. Until now.

She usually sleeps on my head. Not the most comfortable spot for me but ... Four times in the last two weeks she's woken up in the wee hours of the morning, jumped out of bed and woken me in the process. She's a bit of a bulldozer. No problem. Off she's gone into the kitchen to get a drink or a snack or to use the litter box and then comes back to bed. However, on these four particular occasions she's leaped onto the top pillow above my head, stopped - and peed all down my neck and back in a steady stream This is not a pleasant experience and my language reaction has been less than savory. She runs off to find a place to hide, I wash myself off, change the bed linens, spray the OdoBan, change my night attire and go back to sleep, waking a few hours later to find her comfortably purring in her usual spot.

I put her on a regimen of oral liquid antibiotics (Clavamox) which is a pretty good cure-all for general infections but that hasn't done the trick and I was once again peed on last night. My longtime vet has always been very good to me about costs since I've been doing a solo feral spay/neuter/release exercise for years but, now on a fixed income, my resources have been severely cut back. I'm thinking that because of Jessica's age this could be a hormonal thing and I know I'm going to have to take her in for a visit to find out what might be going on but I'm curious whether anyone else has gone through anything like this?

Seriously, why on earth can't she go in the litter box or go on the floor - anywhere other than directly on me? Yikes!
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,500 posts, read 51,456,772 times
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We frequently get threads like this. I can't find one but it was here just days ago. Your cat is trying to tell you she is ill. My cat peed on a plastic shopping bag right at my feet and it didn't take me long to realize something was not as it should be. I know money is tight but your girl is telling you something and you should listen. Good luck.

found it:

//www.city-data.com/forum/cats/...inated-me.html
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:33 PM
 
9,871 posts, read 17,467,933 times
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At her age the chances of her having something like kidney disease, diabetes or hyperthyroid are high. She's peeing on YOU, to tell you something is wrong.

Your first step is to get her in for a check up with blood work. A senior profile including thyroid. A urine culture, too.

Let us know what you find out.
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:40 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,669 posts, read 66,997,888 times
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Thanks. I'd planned on taking her in anyway (provided a small cork inserted overnight in the appropriate orifice didn't do the trick) so will haul her off there tomorrow. And wear a hooded rain jacket in bed tonight ... I'll update. Thanks again.
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
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Good luck. There's perhaps a small possibility that this is behavioral in some way, but seems like far more often this is indication of a medical problem. Hope you are able to find a conclusive problem and course of treatment. 12-13 is indeed prime age for discovering common diseases of senior kitties like hyperthyroid and chronic kidney disease or diabetes. These are treatable so make sure you get enough information before making any rash decisions. (I don't know the state of vet care in St Thomas, but regardless of location you still run across vets at times that might be too quick to suggest euthanasia for diseases that are relatively easy and inexpensive to treat in a way that can prolong a cats life for a few years or more.)

You could block her out of the bedroom tonight if she'll tolerate that. Otherwise, yeah, the rain jacket.
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Old 03-28-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
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Jessica had her vet visit and not without some trauma en route when, despite admonitions to "go before you leave the house" took a poop in her carrier. A stinky drive. Anyway, the diagnosis didn't take long and she has Bartonella with a resultant mild heart murmur. Two courses of Azithromycin and she'll be re-tested after that. I have another much younger cat who was diagnosed likewise a few years ago, responded well to the antibiotics and has tested "clean" to date. Jessica's situation is more acute but otherwise she's in excellent health so hopefully we can protect her against further advancement of the disease and the old girl will have some good years to look forward to.
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Old 03-28-2012, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
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That sounds mostly promising. I hope it all clears up that easily.

I had to look up what Bartonella is; this is the cause of (as you likely know) what is commonly referred to as cat scratch disease when an infected cat scratches you. I found this to be an interesting writeup: http://manhattancats.com/Articles/tr...bartonella.htm Apparently in many cats Bartonella infection doesn't result in any real symptoms and it can be tough to figure out what is going on. So with your previous experience with this, let's hope this is as simple a fix as it sounds.

Regarding the poop in the carrier, this is something I have experience with. And it repeated a few times, even though I greatly shortened the drive by changing vets finally. I broke the cycle by...getting a new carrier. I don't know if this is the ONLY thing, but it has worked and she's now been to the vet 4 times since in the new carrier and hasn't had this problem again.

Interestingly, the carrier where she had the problem was a soft-sided Sherpa brand carrier. The new carrier, and her previous one before the Sherpa, are hard plastic. Not sure if the flexible nature of the Sherpa contributed to the problem or not, but it could have.

Just be prepared that, no matter how much you clean, she may have started a habit with the carrier in the car unless you break the association in some other way.
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Old 03-29-2012, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Monadnock region
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glad it was an easy dx and treatment is underway. It's so annoying to feel bad and have to figure out how to get attention to get fixed! hopefully no more peeing where she shouldn't (eww... and I thought on my back was bad!)
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Old 03-30-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,669 posts, read 66,997,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
So with your previous experience with this, let's hope this is as simple a fix as it sounds.

Regarding the poop in the carrier, this is something I have experience with. Not sure if the flexible nature of the Sherpa contributed to the problem or not, but it could have.

Just be prepared that, no matter how much you clean, she may have started a habit with the carrier in the car unless you break the association in some other way.
If the status quo can be maintained that'll be a plus as all we can aim for is to halt the progression of the disease. I'm optimistic.

Fortunately she doesn't have to travel much at all - hardly even once a year. The consistency of the carrier doesn't seem to be an issue one way or the other. Six months ago when I moved myself and the five felines to a new home, four were perfectly quiet all the way and only one (in a hard carrier) yowled all the way as though headed for the chopping block AND peed in the carrier. Guess who ... Fortunately I had the good sense to bring with me a spray bottle of "OdoBan" on this latest trip so once the vet assistants cleaned out the poop a good spraying removed the lingering odor!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaComeHome View Post
glad it was an easy dx and treatment is underway. It's so annoying to feel bad and have to figure out how to get attention to get fixed! hopefully no more peeing where she shouldn't (eww... and I thought on my back was bad!)
So far so good on the peeing although I'm waking up in the wee hours when she jumps off the bed and waiting wide-eyed for her return to make sure she plonks right down instead of aiming and firing.
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Old 03-31-2012, 07:09 AM
 
9,871 posts, read 17,467,933 times
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So glad she's got a definite diagnosis and is getting treated. You might want to be tested for it yourself, also, having been exposed to it twice. The slightest little scratch from an infected cat can transmit the infection.

I'm glad she's starting to feel better.
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