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Old 08-08-2013, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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One of the kittens (the smallest and most timid...who oddly enough never showed herpes symptoms) is becoming more bold and tolerant of handling. Sometimes she will even hop on my lap for a few moments but she does not purr and her meow is silent... does she just need to relax more?
These were barn cats but they have been handled since about 3 wks of age to medicate.. all are independant but this lttle girl was the hissy one (that's gotten much better). They are about 8 weeks now I believe.
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:55 PM
 
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One of my cats was a feral cat who moved in with me. When she first moved in she did the silent meow all the time. Now she's the most talkative cat we have, but she almost never purrs and when she does it is VERY quiet and you have to be right next to her to hear it, and it doesn't last very long.

It sounds like this kitten is more easily scared than the others, and since making noise would bring attention is trying to be as quiet as possible. Once she is more comfortable I suspect she will start to meow out loud, and probably purr eventually.

~Katy
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
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One of my Siamese-mix kitties purrs VERY quietly. Sometimes the only way I can tell he IS purring is that I pet him and feel the vibrations!
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Old 08-09-2013, 10:48 AM
 
Location: North America
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My oldest cat makes no purring sound. The only way I can tell is to put my hand on her throat.
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Old 08-09-2013, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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One of mine is very hard to please - he rarely purrs and then very quietly. The other one I should've named Evinrude - she can drown out aeroplanes!
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Old 08-09-2013, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
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Is she purring silently? Our Phaedra has a silent purr. We can feel the vibration in her throat if we gently press a finger to the front of her neck but we can't hear her. Callie has a soft low purr that fades off to almost silent. The other two have what most of us would call a normal purr.
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Old 08-09-2013, 06:38 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
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My old ladycat Rainbow never purred (that I know of) until she was around 7 or 8 yrs old. She also would not get in your lap, didn't like to be handled, and rarely tolerated being petted. Then in the span of about 3 months, she did a complete 180. After that she craved attention & lap time, and even allowed me to comb her. Her purr turned out to be quite mellow, but very noticeable. I'm still baffled by her complete change in personality and don't know what triggered it. It happened about 6 months after my wife's passing, but I don't think that had anything to do with it. Sadly, Rainbow went to the Bridge this past March. Sure miss that quirky old girl.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
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We've had cats that purred so softly that you could only feel slight vibrations, and we have also had cats that sounded like a steel mill running at full bore, but all of them have purred to some degree. My one current cat, Lucky, purrs softly but snores like a freight train.

Don
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:52 AM
 
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One of our rescue cats rarely purrs but as we've gotten into a routine, I pet her and ask her why she's not purring, damn if she didn't look up at me and start purring. So now when I rub her during feeding time and in the morning when she's on my dresser helping me get dressed the only time she'll purr is when I rub her and talk to her and it's very soft. She also doesn't talk much compared to our feral who has long loud conversations with us. I'm one of those people who believe cats understand what you're saying. She used to do the silent meow which has now gone from quiet to a squeak which is very enduring. I think your feline will purr at some point, talk to her, rub her and ask her to purr, she will eventually.
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Old 08-13-2013, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
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I'm sure cats do understand what we are saying, although their vocabulary may be somewhat limited. Things like "Do you want to eat? or Want a treat ?" Ours also understand when we tell them to get off the kitchen counter, they jump down as soon as we tell them to do it. Lucky understands when I say "Let's take a nap." He jumps up on the coffee table and waits for me to stretch out on the couch, then he curls up next to me and goes to sleep. They also know their names and will come running when we call them.

I have some pretty in depth conversations with them and they seem to respond appropriately. For example, Lucky likes to hear that he is a good cat. When I tell him that he rolls over and looks up at me.

Don
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