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Old 08-09-2013, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
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We all keep talking about how bad kibble is for cats but a vet on another forum brought up a good question. Is there real research on this subject or is it just the opinion of some vets and cat owners out there? An opinion based only on personal experience, observation and/or or word of mouth? I have wondered this myself a few times. I was unable to find any research showing the harm of feeding cats kibble - grains, veggies and fruit. Surely there has to be some - can anyone direct me to those sites? He said the observation of cats not suffering all the ills they do today in the days before kibble is no proof kibble is the cause. Another thing he brought up is diagnosing cats in the days before kibble was a lot less accurate than it is today. And it is true that in the 1950s people were not bringing their cats to the vet as they are these days. Anyone want to share their ideas on this?
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Old 08-10-2013, 03:57 AM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
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People didn't used to take cats to the vets. I vaguely do remember having a cat who peed in the bathroom sink and I took that cat to the vet and the problem turned out to be a urinary infection, I think. This was a long time ago. I was told that cats should not be eating dry food. I don't know of any research.
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
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I'm not sure about bona fide research, but many vets have told me that cats don't drink enough and they need the water in wet food. Every cat I've known on a dry food diet ended up with UTIs. When one doesn't drink enough, be it human or animal, bad things happen.
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Old 08-10-2013, 03:29 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
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If there is any such research out there, I would be very interested in reading it also. The 12 or so cats that have lived in this house in the past 20 years had both dry & canned food, at a 50/50 to maybe 60/40 ratio (dry/canned). There has always been 2 large water bowls (1/2 gal each) available to them and it always seemed to my wife & I that the cats were drinking enough water. The bowls would be down by a half & be cleaned and refilled every other day. There was only one cat that ever had a UTI (about 2 years ago at age 8), and one round of Clavamox cleared it up with no return of the problem. I'm not arguing one way or the other, just my personal experience.
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Old 08-10-2013, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
7,201 posts, read 13,932,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
People didn't used to take cats to the vets. I vaguely do remember having a cat who peed in the bathroom sink and I took that cat to the vet and the problem turned out to be a urinary infection, I think. This was a long time ago. I was told that cats should not be eating dry food. I don't know of any research.
And this is the problem as I can't find any research either. It's mostly observations and opinions. And some of the sites out there are not even by veterinarians. There are indeed cats who live their entire lives on kibble. My grandson's cat lived to be almost 17 on kibble alone. We all know examples like this. It's like my parents, both chain smokers... my father died at 64 from lung cancer. My mother, also a heavy smoker all her life, lived to be 90, almost 91 and had no detectable lung diseases. But we sure don't recommend smoking to anyone. We have to admit this vet has a point. All the Lab research so far has been done by the feed companies (to their own benefit) even though the number of cats isn't large and the research didn't last very long (months, not years).

Unfortunately the vet I'm talking about is also the moderator there so he simply SILENCES the people who dare to HARD question anything about the pet food industry.
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Old 08-10-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
7,201 posts, read 13,932,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
I'm not sure about bona fide research, but many vets have told me that cats don't drink enough and they need the water in wet food. Every cat I've known on a dry food diet ended up with UTIs. When one doesn't drink enough, be it human or animal, bad things happen.
I agree. There is definitely a connection between dry kibble and some of the health issues cats are suffering from today. The vet I worked for talked about a connection as long ago as the mid 1970s. But legitimate neutral Laboratory research by professionals is what's missing! No one funds it. And without that research, a lot of vets, like the one moderating the Pet section on that travel Forum, simply refuses to believe it. He says the information (we share here on this Forum) is DANGEROUS and he will keep removing the links.
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Old 08-10-2013, 04:51 PM
 
7,329 posts, read 15,586,278 times
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I also feed half wet and half dry. I'd like to feed all wet, but haven't been able to implement that so far. My cats are relatively young (9, 4 and 2) so I don't know what health problems might or might not crop up in the future. But I do know that the older two cats used to eat dry food exclusively, and when I started feeding half wet, I saw an immediate change for the better in the softness of their coats, and the lack of eye crusties. So it's pretty obvious to me that they're better hydrated, and that has to be a good thing for their overall health.
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Old 08-10-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catdad7x View Post
If there is any such research out there, I would be very interested in reading it also.
That's the problem though... there doesn't seem to be any!!! Believe me, in frustration over this one vet' on a Pet Forum, I looked and searched and Googled until I was cockeyed and turned up nothing. Anything negative the feed company researchers turn up is kept quiet. You will not find that anywhere. That would be kept in-house. NEUTRAL research, or any negative outcome information from the feed companies is what it will take to make vet's stop recommending kibble. Now there is a lot of information on the by-products and waste grains used as fillers, the poor quality of the meats used, all kinds of opinions and observations... but no research by professionals!

Quote:
The 12 or so cats that have lived in this house in the past 20 years had both dry & canned food, at a 50/50 to maybe 60/40 ratio (dry/canned). There has always been 2 large water bowls (1/2 gal each) available to them and it always seemed to my wife & I that the cats were drinking enough water. The bowls would be down by a half & be cleaned and refilled every other day. There was only one cat that ever had a UTI (about 2 years ago at age 8), and one round of Clavamox cleared it up with no return of the problem. I'm not arguing one way or the other, just my personal experience.
It appears many cats do fine on kibble alone. This raises questions. But again, using my chain-smoking parents as an example, mom smoked heavily all her life and lived to almost 91, dad died at 64 of lung cancer. We have to keep in mind also that the feed companies are looking for PROFIT and will use as much non-meat products in the kibble as possible. But what effect is this having on kibble-fed cats? No one really knows since the feed companies do not share negative information. And vets have a conflict of interest because healthy cats and dogs don't fill their bank accounts. So where does this leave those who want our cats to be healthy and share the information... when no real research is available as to any negative effects kibble has on cats.
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Old 08-10-2013, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
7,201 posts, read 13,932,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
I also feed half wet and half dry. I'd like to feed all wet, but haven't been able to implement that so far. My cats are relatively young (9, 4 and 2) so I don't know what health problems might or might not crop up in the future. But I do know that the older two cats used to eat dry food exclusively, and when I started feeding half wet, I saw an immediate change for the better in the softness of their coats, and the lack of eye crusties. So it's pretty obvious to me that they're better hydrated, and that has to be a good thing for their overall health.
I agree they do have better coats on canned food... but see, this to a vet' is anecdotal. A worthless testimonial. Personal observation, not proven "fact."
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Old 08-10-2013, 05:30 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
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I agree that independent research on the subject is needed. The problem is, since such a study would in all probability be harmful to the pet food industry (and maybe veterinarians), there wouldn't be anyone willing to fund it. So, unfortunately, it will never be done.
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