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Old 03-05-2014, 07:54 PM
 
501 posts, read 985,844 times
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Hey all,

I have two cats. The first one was a rescue who used to be ferrel. He is a male, about 2 years old. My second cat is also a male, about 6 years old, and was dumped at the ASPCA after his elderly owner died of cancer. When I introduced them last year, they had the normal bumps of introducing two male cats, but they grew accustomed to each other pretty quickly.

We moved into a 4 bedroom house from a 1 bedroom apartment. They had a spraying match and everything calmed down. Then I got married to a woman with two kids from a previous marriage, and the kids terrorized the cats. The younger cat who was ferrel hid for the majority of the time. The older, more social cat would abide them for a while, and then run away when he was at the end of his rope. Long story short, we are getting divorced after a very short time, and they have moved out.

Now, all of a sudden, the younger cat is terrorizing the older one. They tear back and forth upstairs, the younger one is batting the older cat, pouncing on him whenever the opportunity presents itself. What is causing this new found aggression? Is it terretorial since the younger one can now roam around?
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:29 PM
 
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It sounds territorial. That younger cat probably felt cut off from resources while it had to hide from the children. Now it's taking that out on the older cat to ensure access to resources by cutting the older cat off from resources. It's illogical to humans now that it has free access to resources, but it makes sense in the younger cat's mind. Make sure both cats have constant access to their food and water and litter boxes. Don't let that younger cat keep the older one from eating, etc.
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Old 03-05-2014, 08:33 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
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Sounds like you may have to 'reintroduce' them to each other. They are probably a bit traumatized with the move and the children chasing them, etc. If possible give each one a room where they feel safe, and later on do a site swap to get them used to each others' scent. Start a feeding ritual where they are separate, and gradually moved them closer together till they are eating together with no issues. Have regular play sessions to tire them out. It would also help if they have high up places they can get to when they need to feel secure.
Others here may have more specific advice. Hope this helps.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:42 PM
 
501 posts, read 985,844 times
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I have put out an extra litter box (I used to only have one). They also used to eat out of the same bowl. I am going to give them separate bowls now. It was never an issue before but I want to do whatever it takes to have them get along now.
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Old 03-06-2014, 03:47 AM
 
9,152 posts, read 16,731,390 times
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Add two litter boxes, so you have three in total.

Feed a high quality grain free low carb canned diet. The fewer chemicals and carbohydrates the better. Diet plays a very large role in behavior in cats. Cats hopped up on carbs and dehydrated from dry food do not feel their best and will act more ornery than they might, if fed an appropriate diet.

Install feliway plug in diffusers.

Make sure you have plenty of elevated space for both cats.

Make sure they each get enough attention, and a lot of interactive play time, especially the 2 year old, but they both need you to play with them.
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Old 03-08-2014, 09:44 AM
 
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Good subjestions.
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