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Old 03-01-2015, 02:19 PM
 
49 posts, read 191,830 times
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I see many articles about how Apple Pay is more or less the future of mobile payments (if not Apple Pay, Google Wallet or some such). Bottom line is that most articles seem to predict that our actual physical credit cards will be gone soon, as an example of one more thing smartphones will "replace".


I've always said I disagree and find the argument premature because there are plenty of people who don't want/have a smartphone, don't want to pay with their phone, whatever, so I think that physical cards are here to stay as awhile, even if they are no longer the only way to pay.

It got me thinking about the entire smartphone 'thing' though, because in one article someone mentioned a scary but true fact. Our smartphones basically are the center of our lives for many people. We rely on them increasingly for very basic functions. Some of them make a lot of sense -- email, text, instant web browsing, GPS, whatever -- those are features that can be very practical. Then you have the more "fluff" type functions that aren't about functionality as much as just making a statement. Apple Pay has a practical purpose, of course, but it also speaks to what I feel is over-reliance on smartphones.

Even a decade ago, smartphones were not really a thing. You had feature phones, perhaps with color screens, some limited web browsing, email, and text. Somehow, we all got along just fine with these. You could look up info when you needed to. You'd get on your computer for heavy-duty research or long typing sessions (I still do that anyway). Iphone come along in, I believe 2007, and within a year or two it was decided everyone needed a smartphone.

There are drawbacks. Smartphones, by and large, still do not have remarkable battery life most of the time, so if you are relying on them for practicality you may be disappointed. Most get through a day on a charge, but some don't! I miss having a physical, actual keyboard to type on; there are basically no phones left out there offering a QWERTY keyboard except for Blackberry and some flip phones offering the old ABC keyboard.

I think that, as a whole, we are depending too much on these things and missing out on the bigger picture of what's important sometimes. It has been suggested the flip phone is/could be coming back. While I doubt it will ever replace smartphones, I do think some people are realizing that there are more important things to do sometimes vs Instagramming a picture of every food you eat, posting a status about every move you make and place you go, endlessely playing Candy Crush (which would work just fine if it had nothing to do with smartphones and is not even a new concept; it is essentially Bejeweled, an old PC game, on a smartphone), etc. Savor the moment and the people around you. Life is there to be lived and smartphones were simply supposed to be a tool to make certain practical matters easier. Over time, that has shifted from making things easier to simply taking over everything we do.

This is more just a general statement about phones and how Apple Pay is simply increasing the reliance on them. Please chime in with opinions and (friendly) debate on the subject :-)
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Old 03-02-2015, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
1,763 posts, read 2,075,757 times
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I don't think credit cards are going anyway any time son nor in the next decade. The biggest benefit to Apple Pay is security. The merchant never sees your card number like they do when you physically swipe it so when you hear these stories about 'XX Merchant was hacked and 5 million credit card accounts stolen' you don't have to worry because that merchant never saw your card info and never stored it.

Of course you don't have to use contact less payments and will be able to continue to swipe as you always have. Apple Pay won't replace swiping any more than credit cards replaced cash.
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Old 03-02-2015, 06:14 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
6,021 posts, read 3,120,007 times
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crakberry phenomenon was around before ifone.

cash and credit/debit card coexist. i assume fone payment will be in addition to already existing payment methods and won't replace anything until infrastructure is updated... how would you pay at the table at the restaurant ?
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Old 03-02-2015, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,549 posts, read 5,960,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
crakberry phenomenon was around before ifone.

...until infrastructure is updated... how would you pay at the table at the restaurant ?
A lot of this infrastructure is beginning to move into place.

EMV (chip cards) is being pushed on the industry quickly (There's a large liability shift coming in October that is driving change), and most restaurant software is adapting to meet the requirements.

What you'll likely see is a heavy shift to table side payments via wireless EMV terminals that are also NFC capable (all of the terminals we work with are capable of handling EMV, PIN, NFC, Mag stripes, etc).
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Old 03-02-2015, 08:10 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
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^ i was at a restaurant recently with a 7'' touch screen tablet connected to the table for ordering drinks and appetizers.
biggest advancement in dining since the pager (some restaurants just ask for your number so they can text you when your table is ready).

how long do you think it will be until it hits ubiquity... many mom-and-pop corner pizza/chinese are still cash only ?
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,549 posts, read 5,960,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
^ i was at a restaurant recently with a 7'' touch screen tablet connected to the table for ordering drinks and appetizers.
biggest advancement in dining since the pager (some restaurants just ask for your number so they can text you when your table is ready).

how long do you think it will be until it hits ubiquity... many mom-and-pop corner pizza/chinese are still cash only ?
CATs (customer activated terminals) have been tried a bunch of times over the years.

  • Back in the late 90's Boston Market had them in some stores, but they confused customers more than they helped and they scrapped the entire concept.
  • I saw them in either MC Donald's or Burger King in central FL in '02 or '03, but they didn't last long there either.
  • In '02 and '03 we had a CAT product that we sold, and had a few installs in Washington State. We haven't sold, or even been asked about the product in years (and I have no idea what ever happened to those installs).

That said, the environment it completely different now, and the majority of people are used to interacting with touch devices to some degree. I think you'll see more of this, but as a niche product.



As for table side payments / EMV / NFC, I think you'll see that much sooner.

For restaurants that have integrated payments (cards are swiped through the POS system) it's harder to implement; POS vendors and middleware providers have to get each EMV terminal certified to each payment platform (there are dozens of each), and then buy and integrate the hardware to each client. It also represents a massive retraining of staff, and huge changes in the way that POS software works.

For places that already use standalone countertop terminals the change will be easier. Most of those terminals already support auxiliary pin pads, and will support EMV devices with a firmware update. Since those represent a smaller change in the payment process they'll easier to change over.


The other thing is that the EMV push isn't a mandate (like PCI Compliance changes are), and is only a shift in liability. So a business owner has to determine if it's worth a lot of money and time to deal with being liable for fake cards. Places that are at a higher risk of fraud will move more quickly than those that aren't.
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
13,016 posts, read 15,119,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skunk Workz View Post
For restaurants that have integrated payments (cards are swiped through the POS system) it's harder to implement;
Not according to Samsung with their new Payment system. Works with existing readers. I don't understand how, but we shall see...
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,549 posts, read 5,960,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Not according to Samsung with their new Payment system. Works with existing readers. I don't understand how, but we shall see...
I was just looking at that. Seems that it's done by touching the phone to the mag stripe reader?

Of course in the current restaurant scenario this generally won't work as you need both the phone and the customer at the POS terminal (not really ideal), but it's possible for retail.
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:14 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
6,021 posts, read 3,120,007 times
Reputation: 4121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
Not according to Samsung with their new Payment system. Works with existing readers. I don't understand how, but we shall see...
yeah, i wonder how they are gonna' work with something like this:
Amazon.com : Newest USB MSR90 3 Tracks Hi-Co Magnetic Stripe Credit Card Swipe Reader : Electronics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skunk Workz View Post
I was just looking at that. Seems that it's done by touching the phone to the mag stripe reader?

Of course in the current restaurant scenario this generally won't work as you need both the phone and the customer at the POS terminal (not really ideal), but it's possible for retail.
i dont even like giving my card to the waiter (they handed it to a friend to pay for a bar tab once). i definitely am not going to hand over my fone so they can go back and swipe it.
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY 🇺🇸
36,764 posts, read 12,196,685 times
Reputation: 35364
Credit cards aren't going anywhere. Neither is that wad of cash.
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