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Old 03-22-2014, 05:11 PM
 
2,603 posts, read 4,640,150 times
Reputation: 3045

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Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoastbabe View Post
Mark my words- The city is being overdeveloped too soon and too quickly especially when the demand as well as the good paying jobs to meet the demand is not there. Sooner or later, it will come back and bite Charlotte in the a@#. The bubble all over again.
Supply and demand law works both ways.
If too many built, better for renters since rent will be lower.
Right now rent is too high and obviously there is a need for them.

Charlotte it is one of the fastest growing city in the nation, it should be obvious for anybody driving through starting with the airport and from uptown to large new homes developments in Charlotte's sounding towns.

Given than NC is the state with least unionized workforce, if it stays this way, in 30 years I can see a bubbling very large metropolis corridor Charlotte-Greensboro-Raleigh.
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Old 03-22-2014, 05:50 PM
 
489 posts, read 864,143 times
Reputation: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryBGood View Post
Agreed. Too many apartment developments. The developers don't give a flip about the impact that an apartment complex has on a community. They care about profit-- short term and profit less than twenty years down the road when major repairs and maintenance must be made. R.Talbott, if you were a commercial contractor, you'd be aware of these things.

If apartments were such a good thing for an area, the upscale, old-money neighborhoods wouldn't fight the proposals for zoning changes.

This is a question that many communities such as Charlotte must face: when does a city say "no" to growth? It's a vicious cycle: growth requires increased revenues to sustain it, and in order to increase revenues, the city continues to allow growth until the whole mess becomes non-sustainable. When a major downturn in the economy hits, lenders are stuck with a lot of defaulted property which it unloads to the highest bidder (who doesn't usually bid high enough). The result? Blight.

I'm all for a turning Providence, I- 74 North and I-77 into toll roads to make people who don't live in Charlotte help pay to maintain the city infrastructure that helps them to make a living. Some of that income should stay in Charlotte.
The city is investing in the urbanization of uptown and surrounding areas. Charlotte is one of the fastest growing metro's in the nation. Look at the past 10 years of Charlotte development and where the biggest investments have been centralized...

In the past 10 years... first light rail line in North Carolina connecting South Charlotte to Uptown. 4 new museums in Uptown. Several office buildings transforming the skyline. Time Warner Cable Arena. New Uptown baseball stadium. Uptown park. JWU. UNCC Uptown building. Midtown development. The Epicenter. All of Southend. Plaza-Midwood and Elizabeth development.

After all of this successful investment, the next 10 years will bring... extended Blue Line to University Area. Street car connecting East and West. NoDa development. Further Southend and Midtown. More office towers/hotels/and the dreaded apartment towers. Return of retail to Uptown. Further Urbanization...

You really think with all of this, an exponentially growing population, which is expected to gain another 1 MILLION people by 2030, that Uptown will become blighted? Blighted? You have got to be kidding me.

Quote:
The developers don't give a flip about the impact that an apartment complex has on a community
The city has to pass these projects off...

Also...

Quote:
If apartments were such a good thing for an area, the upscale, old-money neighborhoods wouldn't fight the proposals for zoning changes.
I think Charlotte is done building pink high rises for the moment...
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Old 03-22-2014, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Charlotte NC
1,028 posts, read 1,378,451 times
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So is it basically up to the developer to add increased capacity to the roads if they want. Hell that should be mandatory from the start with so many people moving here like cockroaches. It would seriously help out a lot and even though the road funding formula was changed to favor the more urban areas. Less money would have to be used to the surface streets and could be focused more on hell all the freeways here because they all need to be widen more lol. Especially i77, seeing 3 lanes bothers me every time i get on it lol
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Old 03-22-2014, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
645 posts, read 987,642 times
Reputation: 680
You really think with all of this, an exponentially growing population, which is expected to gain another 1 MILLION people by 2030, that Uptown will become blighted? Blighted? You have got to be kidding me.

Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.
Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.
Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.
Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.

Want me to say it again?

The transit additions that you cite will benefit the uptown area only.

You need to get out more. Really.
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Old 03-22-2014, 10:44 PM
 
489 posts, read 864,143 times
Reputation: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by choloboy36 View Post
Is there TOO much growth in the Charlotte and the Greater Charlotte Region? Everywhere you turn something is going on. Growth is DT Charlotte for one with all the Apartment towers. Which areas in the region needs the growth or do you think that we ares finally managing it fairly well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoastbabe View Post
Yes, especially the new apartments that they are building which will probably command both arms and legs. There are just not enough jobs that pay well in Charlotte to rent some of the newer apartments.
....

Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryBGood View Post
You really think with all of this, an exponentially growing population, which is expected to gain another 1 MILLION people by 2030, that Uptown will become blighted? Blighted? You have got to be kidding me.

Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.
Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.
Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.
Again: Uptown is not the only area of Charlotte.

Want me to say it again?

The transit additions that you cite will benefit the uptown area only.

You need to get out more. Really.
The whole discussion in the thread has been about apartment developments in Uptown... there were only 15 replies... be courteous enough to read them next time...

Apartments really aren't being built out in the suburbs, right now, aside from University City and South Park.

Sprawl is out. Urbanization is in.

With population expectations, high rents for high demand as is, blight will be kept to a minimum in Charlotte for sometime. Charlotte is really putting a decent effort into developing the center city, and the want for people to be closer to it isn't going to change anytime soon.

But keep complaining about the imaginary apartments being built in the burbs at a rate that one of the fastest growing cities in the nation won't be able to keep up with...
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Old 03-23-2014, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
645 posts, read 987,642 times
Reputation: 680
R.Talbott:

Some advice:

1. Check out the title of the thread. I'll help you with that: "Is there too much growth in the Charlotte Region?" YOU continue to steer the discussion to uptown while others address the thread title.

2. Have your drinking water tested.

I'm outta this discussion.
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Old 03-23-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Inactive Account
1,508 posts, read 2,829,224 times
Reputation: 970
Charlotte itself is almost out of land to annex. But there is plenty of land to infill.

If people want to see fewer complexes, the city should relax things a little and allow more home owners to add duplex additions or back yard cottages. Amend the code that those can only be rented if the owner lives on the property. Then you would have more small-time landlords in the city, with a stake in its future and the quality of tenants, than with these massive corporately-built places. (FWIW, Seattle has done this.)
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Old 03-23-2014, 11:53 AM
 
15,082 posts, read 11,785,369 times
Reputation: 7296
As long as there is a demand I don't see the problem. The traffic in Charlotte can get bad at times but all cities have this problem.
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Old 03-23-2014, 12:56 PM
 
125 posts, read 232,098 times
Reputation: 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryBGood View Post
R.Talbott:

Some advice:

1. Check out the title of the thread. I'll help you with that: "Is there too much growth in the Charlotte Region?" YOU continue to steer the discussion to uptown while others address the thread title.

2. Have your drinking water tested.

I'm outta this discussion.
You just like to complain don't you. All of your posts are so virulent in intent. There is such a high demand for apartment complexes that they can't build them fast enough. My engineers oversee most of the construction in Charlotte, so I can seriously say that you are off on this one. Apartments are great for young, single, and in some instances; low income households. They are often a halfway before someone goes and buys a house. So as long as the development with residential housing stays steady, the complexes will continue construction. Some people just don't like the way they look but they are essential to a city. Especially uptown where the city is playing catch up to the growth they didn't compensate for.
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Old 03-23-2014, 03:59 PM
 
515 posts, read 996,206 times
Reputation: 269
There isn't a very good road network in Charlotte. They have opted for a vein-artery type of layout...and they keep dumping apartment complexes on the on existing over crowded roads. They are adding a complex on Endhaven and another on Johnson Rd...with more to follow...
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