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Old 05-07-2009, 06:58 AM
 
4 posts, read 8,193 times
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I have been looking into the Charlotte housing market as well as Charleston, SC and I can't get over the fact of how many builders went in and just destroyed every tree for miles and replaced them with "cookie cutter" homes. Now most of those homes are sitting empty on wasted land.

I'm no hippie or anything but those neighborhoods just turn me off. Preserving trees just makes a neighborhood look established from day one. Greed got the best of everyone it seems.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:07 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,879 posts, read 77,469,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0 That Guy 0 View Post
I have been looking into the Charlotte housing market as well as Charleston, SC and I can't get over the fact of how many builders went in and just destroyed every tree for miles and replaced them with "cookie cutter" homes. Now most of those homes are sitting empty on wasted land.

I'm no hippie or anything but those neighborhoods just turn me off. Preserving trees just makes a neighborhood look established from day one. Greed got the best of everyone it seems.
Well, it sounds like either you are not local or you don't know much about the outlying areas where subdivision have been built both here and in Charleston.

As far as here in Charlotte, there really have NOT been many instances where contractors have stripped land. Actually, most of the large subdivisions have been put on farmland wh/ had been cleared for pastures 150 plus years ago.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:16 AM
 
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Well that may be true I didn't think of it that way but I'm just not big on homes that butt up against each other on every side of the house without a single tree on the property.

This is somewhat of an exaggeration but you know what I mean.

Charleston though, I know has had this issue. There's a new development in Park Circle that is making the preservation of trees they're staple selling point for the homes. The neighborhood is called "Oak Terrace Preserve"
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:20 AM
 
Location: NE Charlotte, NC (University City)
1,894 posts, read 6,463,886 times
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The north of Harris Blvd is far too general. I live south of it and have no problems, no regrets, and no reservations about pitching the area to others. However, there are certainly pockets around the Sugar Creek area (aka Derita) that aren't necessarily crime and drug infested crap holes, but they're no aesthetically what I'd choose to buy. Not that it means anything other than who lives there, but the area is a predominantly black neighborhood. It starts to become more of a mixed neighborhood as you move toward Hubbard Rd., and from Hubbard Rd. northward, it's a typical Charlotte makeup: about 50/50 black and white (with some other random folks thrown in to make it interesting). As far as crime goes, the University City CMPD division led the city in crime reduction for the last 6 months (or longer). Most numbers were down by more than 60%. Here's a link (http://www.charmeck.org/Departments/CMPD/Patrol+Divisions/University+City+Division/Home.htm - broken link) to the University City Division of CMPD.

I would search in any neighborhood around Hubbard Rd. and move northward from there...toward WT Harris Blvd. and beyond. The Old Statesville Rd. & WT Harris Blvd. area is a predominantly commercial and industrial area, so it's not too appealing for any sort of residential use.

Here's a quick map I made of the area you're poking around in to help give a better idea of what's here. It calls out the area that I am personally familiar with (through house hunting and buying and living in the area).
Click Here
It doesn't cover everything, but it give a good idea of the conveniences for the area...both current and future. Generally speaking, I would buy anything in the green area. To put it into perspective, my wife and I are in our late 20's, relocated from FL, white, $100k-ish household income, and have a kid on the way. We're not a hip metro couple, but we're not country bumpkins. Middle of the road is what I'd like call it. So draw from that any conclusions you can in relation to you and yours.

Hope this helps.

And yes, it pains me to see homes selling for these low levels after I just bought mine a year ago!!! But, as it should be with any home purchase, our plan is to be here a while. 10 or more years. So we're doing just fine.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:24 AM
 
Location: NE Charlotte, NC (University City)
1,894 posts, read 6,463,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0 That Guy 0 View Post
I have been looking into the Charlotte housing market as well as Charleston, SC and I can't get over the fact of how many builders went in and just destroyed every tree for miles and replaced them with "cookie cutter" homes. Now most of those homes are sitting empty on wasted land.

I'm no hippie or anything but those neighborhoods just turn me off. Preserving trees just makes a neighborhood look established from day one. Greed got the best of everyone it seems.
You are absolutely correct. It disgusts me that developers do it...but even more so, PEOPLE BUY IN TO IT!!! The only reason developers continue to do it is because people still buy the cookie cutter home on a bare lot. We absolutely refused to accept this "norm" and bought a house on an established lot with large trees.

I have always said, I bet folks would pay a premium for a development that went in and carved out lots and streets between existing trees. It seems as though this option is only available for the rich folks however...at least in the new home market.

Makes me sick.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:31 AM
 
7,126 posts, read 11,700,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
JOHN: I am wondering if a lot of these homes were built in 2006 and sold in that year . . . In late 2007 into 2008, several articles were written re: builders who had ties w/ mortgage companies and offered no-doc loans that allowed what could best be termed "unqualified buyers" to purchase homes they couldn't afford. So as not to offend anyone, I do not mean that as a blanket statement, and as I mentioned, articles both in local publications as well as one I cited last year (on this forum) from a national publication have discussed that this is what occurred w/ some of the developments that I believe fall into that zip code.

Eventually, people just couldn't afford adjustable rate mortgages and houses went into foreclosure - the same old story we have seen all over this country.

I have not taken the time to check and see if there are a lot of foreclosures at this minute in that zip. However, I suspect if I did take time to do that, I would find foreclosures. Perhaps someone else has taken time to check this out and can either verify or dispute my supposition. My feeling is things are not selling b/c of foreclosures, and the crime that is often associated w/ developments that have houses standing empty.

I stand corrected if anyone has better info to share - I am making suppositions based on what I have researched in the past.
Good point Ani. Note to Baybrook: This is the kind of information I look for from smart people such as Ani, Loves and a half a dozen other people on this forum.

There's a lot to learn here if you keep an open mind.
je
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:33 AM
 
4 posts, read 8,193 times
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I'm the original poster "homlesstraveler" and changed my name cause I kept forgetting my password.

That map helps me a lot especially because I learn visually aka slow learner - thanks a ton!
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:46 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,879 posts, read 77,469,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0 That Guy 0 View Post
I'm the original poster "homlesstraveler" and changed my name cause I kept forgetting my password.

That map helps me a lot especially because I learn visually aka slow learner - thanks a ton!
THAT GUY: You are NOT a slow learner, LOL. There is a lot to figure out. METALLISTEVE has made very valid observations and you can trust his info as he has spent time getting to know the area. You just have to pick and choose. Of course, the best thing that can happen (for our city) is that people will buy in areas that are perhaps even a bit "suspect" and turn things around in those neighborhoods. I think this CAN happen. Meanwhile, there are some really good bargains and w/ the right guidance, you can find one and live very happily w/ good neighbors around you.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,879 posts, read 77,469,759 times
Reputation: 22752
Quote:
Originally Posted by 0 That Guy 0 View Post
Well that may be true I didn't think of it that way but I'm just not big on homes that butt up against each other on every side of the house without a single tree on the property.

This is somewhat of an exaggeration but you know what I mean.

Charleston though, I know has had this issue. There's a new development in Park Circle that is making the preservation of trees they're staple selling point for the homes. The neighborhood is called "Oak Terrace Preserve"
Oh, as far as houses on tiny lots - yeah - that is too bad but our city should never have agreed to permit those small lots. So not only are the builders to blame - I think city planners should be chastened for allowing it to happen.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: NE Charlotte, NC (University City)
1,894 posts, read 6,463,886 times
Reputation: 1049
To the original poster...

My move to Charlotte started the exact same way...albeit in a different housing market, but still, I logged in and saw home going for $150-250k that would easily sell for $300-500k in Central Florida. Now, this was 2006/07, but that still illustrates the level-headedness of Charlotte (relatively speaking, comparing against other comparable metro regions). The housing market never inflated here...at least not like other regions. Natives will say it did compared to 1980 or earlier, but realistically speaking, EVERYTHING in the country did then!

As much not-so-happy threads you can read on here about job loss and not being able to sell a home, Charlotte is still weathering this crap time FAR better than the vast majority of other comparable metro regions. It's not all peaches and cream, but it's certainly not a wasteland like Orlando has become (for instance).

One of the key things I picked up on when researching the region was the diversity of the economy here. Sure, banks hold the largest shares in terms of employment, but nearly every aspect of the economy has a slice of the pie here. I read that there are 300 of the Fortune 500 companies with an office or HQ in the Charlotte metro region. What that means is while one side of the economy can tank, there are tons of other pieces that still do ok and keep our region from slipping into the likes of, say, Detroit. Again, we're not bullettproof, but we're not weak either.
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