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Old 09-01-2017, 11:33 AM
 
Location: PSL
8,224 posts, read 3,514,774 times
Reputation: 2964

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
Stay with a mid 50's to 60's model. The issue is Chevrolet didn't have oil pumps in the engines until the early 50's. They used the old cup and slinger method of lubrication previously. You don't run one of those engines very fast if you want to make it where you're going. It all started with the old reliable 235 straight 6.

Frankly, if I were looking for a vintage truck, I'd want a modern engine in it. The old engines are not designed to run on unleaded gas. Valves can be a problem. The old gas contained lead which was in the gas for lubricating the valves. Many depended on the amount of ZDDP in the oil for keeping the parts from grinding against each other. ZDDP has been drastically reduced due to emissions on the newer cars. The ZDDP is suspected of causing damage to the cats which are expensive to replace. You won't find an oil on the market that reproduces the same amount of ZDDP.
Yeah they reformulated shell Rotella T found that the hard way wiped out a custom ground solid lifter cam. That was a 600 dollar booboo...

From that day on I bought the additive dumped it in a 5qt jug of mobil1 and made a little stirrer to go in a cordless drill then shook it about like a mad man possessed LOL

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
I'd be looking for fuel injection and electronic ignition. There are many of the newer engines available that come with everything for the after market installation. The installation is pretty much straight forward, mount the engine, screw the electronics to a cool place under the hood, plug and play. Ford, GM, and Dodge all have engines available like that, some are performance engines, others can be as lowly as a V6. I'd be looking at Hemmings Motor News or cars online for what's available. Might find exactly what you're looking for and in your area.
Cars On line.com: Classic Cars For Sale
https://www.hemmings.com/
He'd be alright with a carbed small block. Can build them up cheap now!

Could also drop the body on a Monte Carlo or other G body car and have a coil spring rear.
Or transplant to an S10 chassis... I've seen that done too.

Or do what everyone else does LS swap from a rolled truck... or wrecked vette trans am camaro...
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Old 09-01-2017, 11:35 AM
 
Location: PSL
8,224 posts, read 3,514,774 times
Reputation: 2964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punchy71 View Post
Is Grundy some kind of insurance company?
Yes.
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:03 PM
 
203 posts, read 1,020,969 times
Reputation: 55
With a carburetor I'd for sure want a GM H.E.I. ignition system. Or possibly a Pertronix Ignitor module with a points and condenser style ignition system. I'm not sure how a computer-controlled distributor system would either a)help or b)be set up on an old-style small block or even an inline 6-cyclinder engine for that matter.
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:33 PM
 
33,387 posts, read 34,940,315 times
Reputation: 20030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punchy71 View Post
Hi,
I'm thinking of possibly getting a 1940's, 50's or 60's Chevrolet pickup truck to drive on a daily basis. Mostly around town, but occasionally on the highway too. If this is possible in our modern day and age, what are some things I should look for (or have done to it after I buy one) to make it more reliable and dependable like a modern day pickup truck or car?
Thank you
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY_refugee87 View Post
How big is your wallet? For the right money, anything is possible.

Your insurance company will be your best friend... $$$ to put more than 5k miles per year on classics/customs. Grundy on the other hand had more affordable rates for classics and customs with no mileage limits...
ny asks a great question, how much are you willing to spend to make a vintage truck a daily driver? and what are you really looking for in a daily driver? you said essentially mostly city driving, and some highway, but are you going to haul much of anything? what else are you planning for this truck?

as for the insurance question, yes grundy is an insurance company that specializes in classic vehicle insurance, among others. be very careful when dealing with classic insurance companies in regards to mileage limitations, and use limitations. some will let you drive the vehicle once in a while, like on weekends, in parades, etc. but overall use and mileage are limited. others will let you use the vehicle as a daily driver with no mileage limitations, but they will charge you more.

you can also go with your regular insurance company, just remember to add an agreed value coverage, so that if anything bad happens to the truck, the company will pay you the agreed amount to buy the vehicle from you, so if you go that route, you want to update your insurance coverage every year. and you will need an appraisal each time to update the insurance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Punchy71 View Post
Which modern engine would you chose? ...for example...
if i were building say a 67 chevy pick up, i would go with something like an LS3, or an LQ4(same basic engine but cast iron block and usually found in late model trucks and big SUVs). chevrolet has the necessary wiring harness and engine management control unit for use in vintage vehicles. i would also mate it to an overdrive transmission as well.
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:41 PM
 
35,309 posts, read 52,449,074 times
Reputation: 31001
You can dream about a few of these =
Collector GMC Trucks For Sale
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Old 09-04-2017, 03:59 PM
 
1,095 posts, read 1,063,796 times
Reputation: 2616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punchy71 View Post
Hi,
I'm thinking of possibly getting a 1940's, 50's or 60's Chevrolet pickup truck to drive on a daily basis. Mostly around town, but occasionally on the highway too. If this is possible in our modern day and age, what are some things I should look for (or have done to it after I buy one) to make it more reliable and dependable like a modern day pickup truck or car?
Thank you
The single biggest help for older cars is to convert the ignition system to electronic away from points.
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