U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-14-2011, 04:34 PM
 
5,870 posts, read 11,523,882 times
Reputation: 4551

Advertisements

Or am I the only one.

I think the Chicago suburbs are great because there is some type for everyone. From the more urban-walkable suburbs such as Oak Park and Evanston to mid ring suburbs with a nice downtown by the metra stations, to the charming towns of the Fox River Valley or lower Des Plaines to the old lake resort town or Lake County, I think there is an incredible variety of suburban communities, in what is considered Chicagoland.

However, although I do spend time in Chicago proper certainly, I take the opportunities, to travel to and visit, and immerse myself in the hot spots and attractions of other American cities when possible.

Chicago is alright, but I really love visiting other cities a little more. The very thing that people love about: skyline, extensive public transportation, density, etc. (the fact that is a "real city") to me feels physically overwhelming, yet that actual attractions themselves feel to me at least like their are counterparts in other cities where you don't deal with as many crowds, and (or what I perceive as) claustrophic density

For example:

I love LA, as that area is feels more of a complex of exciting cosmopolitan smaller cities that are all very close to one another, along with the climate, ocean, and mountains, make it a place that I try to visit at least once a year. I also love visiting the underappreciated or misunderstood smaller midwestern metrpolises 5 hours from Chicago. (ie: Detroit or Cincinnati)

I'm happy where I live, and I don't feel like I have to live in those places to be happy, as convenience, and being already established means, theres no real reason for me to move.

Does this apply to anyone else at all.

Is anyone living in Chicagoland but yet saves their time and money somewhat to go travel to other American cities, that are more of your style??

It seems that so many people value Chicago for Chicago itself, but prefer suburban living somewhere else where they can get more house for their money (as if that is the only value for living in smaller communities near a big city).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-14-2011, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,469,342 times
Reputation: 6126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Or am I the only one.

I think the Chicago suburbs are great because there is some type for everyone. From the more urban-walkable suburbs such as Oak Park and Evanston to mid ring suburbs with a nice downtown by the metra stations, to the charming towns of the Fox River Valley or lower Des Plaines to the old lake resort town or Lake County, I think there is an incredible variety of suburban communities, in what is considered Chicagoland.

However, although I do spend time in Chicago proper certainly, I take the opportunities, to travel to and visit, and immerse myself in the hot spots and attractions of other American cities when possible.

Chicago is alright, but I really love visiting other cities a little more. The very thing that people love about: skyline, extensive public transportation, density, etc. (the fact that is a "real city") to me feels physically overwhelming, yet that actual attractions themselves feel to me at least like their are counterparts in other cities where you don't deal with as many crowds, and (or what I perceive as) claustrophic density

For example:

I love LA, as that area is feels more of a complex of exciting cosmopolitan smaller cities that are all very close to one another, along with the climate, ocean, and mountains, make it a place that I try to visit at least once a year. I also love visiting the underappreciated or misunderstood smaller midwestern metrpolises 5 hours from Chicago. (ie: Detroit or Cincinnati)

I'm happy where I live, and I don't feel like I have to live in those places to be happy, as convenience, and being already established means, theres no real reason for me to move.

Does this apply to anyone else at all.

Is anyone living in Chicagoland but yet saves their time and money somewhat to go travel to other American cities, that are more of your style??

It seems that so many people value Chicago for Chicago itself, but prefer suburban living somewhere else where they can get more house for their money (as if that is the only value for living in smaller communities near a big city).
Who doesnt like to travel and get to see other spots in the nation , that is what makes this country so great!

I love to visit other spots like california ,colorado and the east coast
but there is nothing that compares to coming home right here.

Not sure what nut case wouldnt like to travel and experience the culture and vibe of another area. Wouldnt it be boring if all places were the same how then would we appreciate the differences.

There sure is alot of space between the atlantic coast line and the west coast every spot in between has such special character.

thank god we can travel freely
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2011, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Chicago
4,091 posts, read 3,728,877 times
Reputation: 688
What is with your obsession about wanting to talk about any other city but Chicago in the Chicago and Chicago burbs forums?

It is very strange.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2011, 08:44 PM
 
5,656 posts, read 17,976,714 times
Reputation: 4054
I like Cincinnati ... it is great American city. And Indianapolis. Mostly dislike Atlanta.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2011, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Seattle
7,459 posts, read 7,520,069 times
Reputation: 10473
A short answer is: yes.

But the same could be said for virtually any city in the US. I mean, if everyone was content just staying exactly where they are, nobody would ever travel.

People living in Chicagoland have the benefit of easy access to a global city. Most people I know in the metro visit Chicago more often than they do other places. It's less expensive in terms of both time and money. An hour car/train ride vs. several hours on a car or plane, for example. But of course you're going to want to see other cities and areas of the country and world...

I don't know if that's what you're getting at...but that's how I read it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2011, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Lake Arlington Heights, IL
5,479 posts, read 10,968,001 times
Reputation: 2818
I am a big Chicago fan. I think it is a world class city in an American way. I also enjoy visiting other cities and comparing/contrasting life there with life in Chicago and suburbs. US cities I enjoyed visiting/business travel include: San Francisco, Austin TX., Houston TX, New Orleans, Tampa, Seattle,Milwaukee, Twin Cities, Fargo ND, Grand Forks ND, Des Moines, Kansas City, St. Louis, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, Berlin, Amsterdam, Hamburg, Cologne, Munich, Zurich & Athens.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2011, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 27,466,816 times
Reputation: 6341
When we only visit major cities we miss what makes America great. It is amazing what is missed by not traveling America's highway and byways and in what is not seen.

America the beautiful from sea to shining sea is a living classroom from the oldest, tallest living redwood tree to Palo Duro Canyon, to White Sands and War Eagle Mill. There are Civil War Battlefields, Civil War cemetaries, and a home built before the Civil War that was commandeered and used as the headquarters for both the Union and the CSA. I've trveled extensively from Illinois to the Pacific Ocean, and from Illinois to NOLA and haven't even begun to scratch the surface of what is America.

I find great pleasure in life's little surprises. It still amazes me that I can find colored rocks (white, green, pink, gray, black, and blue) of different shape, hue and size that the ocean deposits in California, or the blinding white sand in New Mexico, and that there is a reason for every beat of the powwow drum from the opening cermonies to the closing ceremonies. It is amazing what I an find within fifty-miles of my home and it is free; all I have to do is look.

Last edited by linicx; 04-15-2011 at 09:20 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2011, 09:34 PM
 
5,870 posts, read 11,523,882 times
Reputation: 4551
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
When we only visit major cities we miss what makes America great. It is amazing what is missed by not traveling America's highway and byways and in what is not seen.

America the beautiful from sea to shining sea is a living classroom from the oldest, tallest living redwood tree to Palo Duro Canyon, to White Sands and War Eagle Mill. There are Civil War Battlefields, Civil War cemetaries, and a home built before the Civil War that was commandeered and used as the headquarters for both the Union and the CSA. I've trveled extensively from Illinois to the Pacific Ocean, and from Illinois to NOLA and haven't even begun to scratch the surface of what is America.

I find great pleasure in life's little surprises. It still amazes me that I can find colored rocks (white, green, pink, gray, black, and blue) of different shape, hue and size that the ocean deposits in California, or the blinding white sand in New Mexico, and that there is a reason for every beat of the powwow drum from the opening cermonies to the closing ceremonies. It is amazing what I an find within fifty-miles of my home and it is free; all I have to do is look.

Absolutely. I couldn't agree with you more. In fact I probably have traveled more extensively to places like National Parks more than I have to American cities. Its what I grew up doing, and have spent my college and grad school years in small college towns in beautiful, thinly populated parts of the country.

My background is actually in environmental-related fields. However in terms of jobs and social network, it is difficult to find these things in the more rural parts of America.

One of the aspects of a city however that I care about a lot is how quick you can get to a beautiful natural area. For example: the Palos forest preserves and the Indiana Dunes are two areas that I cherish within the Chicago area, that balances off the city life.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2011, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,469,342 times
Reputation: 6126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Absolutely. I couldn't agree with you more. In fact I probably have traveled more extensively to places like National Parks more than I have to American cities. Its what I grew up doing, and have spent my college and grad school years in small college towns in beautiful, thinly populated parts of the country.

My background is actually in environmental-related fields. However in terms of jobs and social network, it is difficult to find these things in the more rural parts of America.

One of the aspects of a city however that I care about a lot is how quick you can get to a beautiful natural area. For example: the Palos forest preserves and the Indiana Dunes are two areas that I cherish within the Chicago area, that balances off the city life.
Cook county , Will County, Dupage and Lake County Illinois all have land set aside for forest preserves. Its not just limited to Palos.

The preserves are a network thousands of acres of land set aside. I believe it was in Daniel Burnhams plan to balance nature and urban living.


"Burnham's call for an extensive lakefront park and a regional system of forest preserves was predated by Aaron Montgomery Ward's campaign to preserve Grant Park for public use and by the publication in 1904 of a report entitled “The Outer Belt of Forest Preserves and Parkways for Chicago and Cook County.” Although this latter document, edited by architect Dwight Perkins, was the first proposal for a regional network of parks, today's extensive system of parks along the shoreline of Lake Michigan and the 67,000-acre Cook County Forest Preserve system were both chiefly inspired by the Burnham Plan."


since your from the area? you probably know this correct? Most people from NE Illinois in specific Chicagoland are very well of the network of preserves and most enjoy them for the serenity.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2011, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,469,342 times
Reputation: 6126
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
When we only visit major cities we miss what makes America great. It is amazing what is missed by not traveling America's highway and byways and in what is not seen.

America the beautiful from sea to shining sea is a living classroom from the oldest, tallest living redwood tree to Palo Duro Canyon, to White Sands and War Eagle Mill. There are Civil War Battlefields, Civil War cemetaries, and a home built before the Civil War that was commandeered and used as the headquarters for both the Union and the CSA. I've trveled extensively from Illinois to the Pacific Ocean, and from Illinois to NOLA and haven't even begun to scratch the surface of what is America.

I find great pleasure in life's little surprises. It still amazes me that I can find colored rocks (white, green, pink, gray, black, and blue) of different shape, hue and size that the ocean deposits in California, or the blinding white sand in New Mexico, and that there is a reason for every beat of the powwow drum from the opening cermonies to the closing ceremonies. It is amazing what I an find within fifty-miles of my home and it is free; all I have to do is look.
Great posting -well said
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top