U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-24-2021, 03:53 PM
 
732 posts, read 600,343 times
Reputation: 501

Advertisements

Demographics are the key force at play here - just look at the number of individuals who live in city centers and are having/ are going to have children. Suddenly, schools matter; having access to daycare matters; having a yard matters. Not paying $850K for a 2BR condo with a noisy neighbor on the next side of the wall matters.

Suburbs were built to raise families. When people want to raise families, many of them decide that the amenities offered in the suburbs outweigh those in the cities. To boot - many of the suburbs have core, walkable downtowns that imitate city life on a smaller scale, so parents of younger children can also enjoy brief stints of the "city life" or they choose to live near transportation to be able to go into the city when the whim strikes.

As to Covid? It appears to be exacerbating an already growing trend. I think we will need more historical data to accurately tell if suburbs actually became more popular during the pandemic.

A final note - many families with grown children actually appear NOT to be moving (this is not an IL phenomenon, but across the board in suburbs). Kids don't fly to coop as early. Many parents seem to want to be around for college-aged kids after the graduate and get settled.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-24-2021, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Chicago
201 posts, read 54,549 times
Reputation: 84
Logic87, People have been moving the the suburbs for the last 30 years. People thought the suburbs would be so lively and the city dead and always looked down at the city. Like what gentrifying suburbs I want to know.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2021, 10:14 PM
 
2,369 posts, read 1,399,957 times
Reputation: 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logic87 View Post
I have been looking to buy in the suburbs and I have noticed an increase in younger couples (without kids) and older couples attending open houses. I’m assuming these types are living in the city and are now moving to the suburbs.

With that said, it’s kinda annoying that all these urbanites have suddenly gained an interest in the suburbs. A few years ago many of them looked down on the suburbs for being too boring and not having great places to eat.

They went from gentrifying the city to now gentrifying the suburbs.
There's no suburbs that suddenly started "gentrifying" in the past 12 months that wasn't already "gentrifying" pre-pandemic.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2021, 11:15 AM
 
732 posts, read 600,343 times
Reputation: 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusillirob1983 View Post
There's no suburbs that suddenly started "gentrifying" in the past 12 months that wasn't already "gentrifying" pre-pandemic.
This is a fair point - the desirable suburbs are just getting more desirable, and some of the middle-tier are trying to break into that upper tier. However, there are certainly suburbs that are becoming less desirable. It's a trend of (micro)location that is exacerbated by the pandemic.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2021, 02:28 PM
 
2,369 posts, read 1,399,957 times
Reputation: 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJA29 View Post
This is a fair point - the desirable suburbs are just getting more desirable, and some of the middle-tier are trying to break into that upper tier. However, there are certainly suburbs that are becoming less desirable. It's a trend of (micro)location that is exacerbated by the pandemic.
Interesting thought about how some may be becoming less desirable. Are there any you're thinking of in Chicagoland and why? I can see city neighborhoods becoming less desirable (at least in the short term, and I think those are short-sighted decisions unless those people were inevitably going to leave the city anyway).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2021, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,876 posts, read 2,786,568 times
Reputation: 6644
I think so. All across the country, as people began working from home, they started to realize the benefits (from quality of life/wellness standpoint) of having space that suburbs provide. Having a lawn, green grass, nature, and not having to share crowded space are big benefits of suburbs vs a city. Plus, in a region like Chicagoland, you can always access the city when you want to for entertainment, but still take advantage of living in the suburbs.

Many younger people who were living in the city, left to live with parents during the pandemic. And many older, wealthier left for time shares or other properties. At first it was fear of having to ride elevators with people or coming in contact with people during the height of the pandemic. But beyond that, I think people realized the value of space. I think there will be a trend towards people moving to the suburbs post-pandemic. How big of a trend is hard to tell. It will be interesting to see how quickly city life will bounce back, especially now that vaccines are being distributed, cases are declining, and things are slowly opening up.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2021, 02:27 PM
 
753 posts, read 837,712 times
Reputation: 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fresh_Coast View Post
They can’t wait to get back once the city re-opens. They are pretty desperate for social interaction, nightlife, restaurants, and most importantly to find a significant other. I think it’s going to be like the roaring 20’s for a while once it opens back up.
I think that’s all of us - and you are spot on. As soon as vaccine comfort hits (any one who wants it can get it) the party will start. Everything will be on a energy bon fire not just city but also the burbs...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2021, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,296 posts, read 5,202,163 times
Reputation: 4111
Quote:
Originally Posted by My Kind Of Town View Post
It’s been a trying year for many schools throughout the country so I’m not going to let a once in a lifetime pandemic sway my opinion of D205 too much. I have been disappointed with some of the decisions they’ve made but my kids have been on a hybrid schedule for most of this school year and return to full time in-person schooling next week. The teachers are doing the best they can given the circumstances but I do feel the kids are falling behind a bit (probably no different than most of the country tbh). It puts more onus on the parents to work with their kids outside of school, which we are trying to do even though both my wife and I work full time. I’m glad they finally found a safe way for the grade school kids to return in person full time, even if it is for a couple hours less than a “normal” school day, because many schools still aren’t doing that. Overall, I feel the teachers and leadership at Hawthorne have done a good job considering the circumstances. (By the way, kids are no longer eating snacks outside during cold weather after that social media blowup last month).
So you're cool with D205 not being full time, in person next fall? I definitely am NOT cool with that. At all. That's where we are headed. I've been very involved with the district's covid response and I'm so disgusted. I honestly can't hide my disgust for Moyer, ETU and whoever these "doctors" are that are advising him. It's interesting to me that there's no transparency around who is giving the D205 admin all of their advice. Other districts clearly state who is advising them and they even allow parents and students to give input. Not D205.

I also hate that they made testing mandatory in order to return to school in person. They surveyed parents and only 25% were for it, and in the survey they said it would be optional for "a full return." In reality they made it mandatory, going against CDC and state guidelines, and they're forcing it on people when HS is only going to be in person for 2 half days a week. None of this is even close to good enough for me.

So, in short, hell yes I am holding all of this against D205. I wouldn't recommend Elmhurst to anyone. I wish we lived somewhere else. And, I realize that by making Elmhurst undesirable I'll have a harder time getting out myself, but I won't lie to people and say it's not that bad. Our school district leaders are pretty damn abhorrent right now.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2021, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,296 posts, read 5,202,163 times
Reputation: 4111
Quote:
Originally Posted by lp_res86 View Post
If you think that's bad, you should talk to parents in CPS. There was absolutely no support of remote school last spring/summer (teachers were not teaching online at all, we were just given worksheets). It is almost March and right now we are still 100% remote. Kids have not been in the classroom in a year. We are set to start hybrid on March 1st (2 days/week, with many teachers receiving accommodations) and there is a very good chance that we will still be hybrid next fall. I will take any suburban district over that.
CPS is worse than Elmhurst, I would definitely agree. But, property taxes in Chicago are not as high as they are in Elmhurst, either. I don't think anyone moves to Chicago for the amazing CPS schools. The Chicago Teachers Union has been hostile for my entire life. If you move to Chicago you know the school system is complicated and focused on the teachers. When we moved to Elmhurst the schools were "amazing" and all I heard was how awesome they were. If we were still in Chicago our taxes would be half what we are paying and paying for private school would be a lot less of a punch to the gut.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2021, 08:55 AM
 
Location: LaGrange, Wisconsin
22 posts, read 3,653 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
CPS is worse than Elmhurst, I would definitely agree. But, property taxes in Chicago are not as high as they are in Elmhurst, either. I don't think anyone moves to Chicago for the amazing CPS schools. The Chicago Teachers Union has been hostile for my entire life. If you move to Chicago you know the school system is complicated and focused on the teachers. When we moved to Elmhurst the schools were "amazing" and all I heard was how awesome they were. If we were still in Chicago our taxes would be half what we are paying and paying for private school would be a lot less of a punch to the gut.
It is amazing how much your views about the world and everything in it change once you have a child. My daughter turns 2 in a few months (time flies) and I am sure before I know it she will be gearing up for her own start in school. This was a critical variable in our home search. We even looked at houses that were on the outskirts of Lake Geneva, even though I hate Lake Geneva, simply because they were houses still within the confines of that school district (among the best in the state).

I can't imagine dealing with CPS with school aged children, and I have sympathy for parents in this situation. You are pretty much left with either forking over the money for a private school or hoping and praying your child earns a spot at one of the few decent ones. And who wants to roll the dice with their child's future? All the diversity, museums and ideological gobbledegook in the world mean nothing if your kid will not be offered the best possible opportunity that you as a parent can provide.

That being said, there are plenty of outstanding school districts in the Chicagoland region. When I still lived in Wauconda my neighbors who had kids could not have been more pleased with the teachers and school district. One of my best buds from work lives in Lake Zurich and has 2 kids in public schools and he similarly is nothing but complimentary most of the time.

There is a reason that the school districts are prominently displayed at the bottom of every listing on Zillow, but for many parents they might as well be at the top since they are one of the most important factors.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top