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Old 07-31-2010, 05:50 AM
 
70 posts, read 256,975 times
Reputation: 75

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I moved to Chicago three years ago from Boston, and have been in the LakeShore East/New East Side neighborhood since day 1. Stumbled upon this great location from a buddy in college.

I am still young, in my mid 20's and these are my observations:

It is an up and coming neighborhood. You're centrally located to the entire city: whether that's to Wrigley or Cellular Field, China Town, Navy Pier, River North restaurants, or the Cook County/Rush hospitals, to the Beaches, the Museums, to the Loop, 25 mins to Midway on Orange Line, and 40 mins to O'Hare on Blue Line, and to the Lincoln Park/Division and Rush bar scene.

You're a 3 min walk to Millenium Park. You're a 6 min walk to Randolph/Wabash El line and a few mins more to State/Lake Red and Blue line.

I've read on this board some people complaining about the lack of restaurants and options. There are a few hotels in the area with bars and restaurants, the Shoreham has a coffee/italian ice cream shop, your a few mins away from a Starbucks on Michigan and Lake, and all the restaurants you want in the Loop, etc. Theyre in the process of building a steakhouse restaurant, a grocery store, and a parking garage adjacent to the north side of 340 E Randolph. That'll be done next year.

The demographics down here vary. Dare I say, slightly sophisticated, certainly very urban and "downtown" crowd, you have your private equity CEOs to your lawyer to your doctor to your retiree to your Art Institute student to the newly grad banker/consultant crowd. There's definitely more money in this neighborhood than there are in most parts of the city.

Lincoln Park gives off that cliche "I just graduated from college and living with my friends" vibe or the "I am settling down with my sweetheart and ready to move in and get a dog" crowd. While you've got the latter in this neighborhood, you don't have the former. I'm even told a few Chicago athletes live here.

You've got the Lake path right next door. To the immediate north you've got the Chicago River, to the immediate east you've got Lake Shore Drive, and to the immediate south you've got Grant Park. To the west you've got the Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Aon, Prudential and then Michigan Ave. It' manages to be a very insulated neighborhood in the city, yet remarkably close to everything. It's amazing to be able to walk along Michigan Ave or thru the Loop with thousands and thousands of people, walk three blocks East and you're in a different world.

There is a 6 acre park in the development with all of the Lake Shore East/New East Side buildings surrounding it (google map it). There is a childs playground, a dog walking park, and then the general park.

I've never witnessed any crime, and not even on the petty level that I know of. And I work in the Loop in the overnight, so I'm coming back on Michigan Ave and down Randolph Street at 3 and 4 am and have never had a problem. Millenium Park is well guarded, and Grant Park always has a cop or two somewhee.

Sure it has a sterile feel, but where in the city is it not sterile? City life isn't natural anyways, so I'm not sure it'll ever not feel sterile.

If you work in the Loop the most expensive cab ride will be 6$ if you work at the Sears Tower. Anything closer is $4-5.

There are two grocery stores in the neighrborhood that I know of, the closest big one is Dominicks on the other side of the river. A few of the condo buildings here have shuttle services that will take you throughout the Loop and River North/Streeterville area for shopping, etc.

If you're looking for the diamond in the rough, look at 400 East Randolph. Built in the 70s I believe and last fall put $2 mil in to renovating their gym - has all the bells and whistles. For the price of a studio at Aqua or Shoreham or the Tides, you can get a one bedroom at 400 East.

Lastly, come Jazz Fest and Lollapolooza, you don't even need to buy a ticket to the show, just step outside your building and you've got a front row view.
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Old 08-01-2010, 12:23 PM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
4,620 posts, read 7,582,998 times
Reputation: 6313
Quote:
Originally Posted by GodBlesstheUSA View Post
...
City life isn't natural anyways, so I'm not sure it'll ever not feel sterile.
...
Right. Didn't do so well in history did you?

There have been cities longer than we have recorded history for.

If that's "not natural," than so are things like organic bread and pants.
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Old 08-01-2010, 01:07 PM
 
7,305 posts, read 14,627,052 times
Reputation: 3746
I'm glad you like it. It's a very specific "city" experience over there. Some like it. I'd feel like I was living in a filing cabinet, myself. Then, I prefer red brick and tree-lined streets and walkups.
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:40 PM
 
Location: USA
5,580 posts, read 5,019,831 times
Reputation: 3483
If you're into living in a box 500 feet in the air with a great view of more cookie cutter skyscrapers in your hood plus all the amenities available to never have to exit the building, then it's perfect.
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Old 08-02-2010, 12:28 AM
 
143 posts, read 416,593 times
Reputation: 72
more like cockroach boxes in the air!

Quote:
Originally Posted by It'sAutomatic View Post
If you're into living in a box 500 feet in the air with a great view of more cookie cutter skyscrapers in your hood plus all the amenities available to never have to exit the building, then it's perfect.
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Old 08-02-2010, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,704 posts, read 97,476,758 times
Reputation: 29849
Eh -- not my kind of place but I'm glad it's working out for you. One of the nice things about Chicago: a wide variety of living arrangements to accommodate a wide variety of tastes.
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Old 08-02-2010, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Uptown
1,520 posts, read 2,419,224 times
Reputation: 1236
It just seems too plastic, generic, sterile and unexciting. I get the impression when i visit folks there that many of the units are second or third homes and rarely occupied. I do like the high rises, but i hate that so many were done as towers on parks or podiums, it disrupts neighborhood continuity,something the area badly needs. If i was going to live in a high rise, i'd go river north, south loop, lincoln park, streeterville or east lakeview before lakeshore east, better food, better bars and better community.
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:52 PM
 
1,210 posts, read 2,910,198 times
Reputation: 650
I like high rises, mostly for the view and to a certain extent the amenities. Beyond that the neighborhoods aren't very... well neighborhood like. It's nice being near the loop and near north side to a certain degree, but I really prefer something slightly more organic. Even worse, in my opinion, are people who live in the Loop. No idea how they do that.

To each their own though.
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Old 01-15-2011, 09:23 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,390 posts, read 27,001,631 times
Reputation: 5815
Quote:
Originally Posted by GodBlesstheUSA View Post

Sure it has a sterile feel, but where in the city is it not sterile? City life isn't natural anyways, so I'm not sure it'll ever not feel sterile.
Umm... pretty much everywhere outside of greater DT? I much prefer neighborhoods with some character. You sound like you've never been north of Lincoln Park or South of Roosevelt.
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Old 01-15-2011, 05:04 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 2,178,330 times
Reputation: 811
I took a walk over there for the first time about a month ago (I'm pretty new to Chicago) and I loved the sloping park they created, with all the evergreens, and the multiple levels of terraces around it. It just had this very fresh, current, west coast kinda feel that I sometimes miss. I mean if it were in another city I might think "meh," but since it's in Chicago I appreciate how it's break from the ordinary here.
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