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Old 02-05-2011, 06:34 PM
 
5,981 posts, read 13,121,497 times
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I'm not even talking only about gentrification here.

The fact is, is that immigrants eventually want the same things that native born Americans want: and that is a bigger yard and better schools for their kids, and eventually their communities move out to suburban communities.

But yet, it seems that everyone still clings to this idea of culturally diverse core city, and largely white suburbs, that started become incorrect in the 80s.

There have been majority AA suburbs for a long time, and older industrial suburbs have been attracting hispanics for a long time, and Asians have for a while been skipping the inner city for the suburbs when they get here.

Why do people still cling to this outdated concept?? Is this a bit more of a Chicagoland phenomena than in other metros, where the distinction between "the big city" and "suburbia" is much less clear such as on the east coast or California?
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Old 02-05-2011, 07:26 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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By East coast do you mean NYC and DC. And by California do you mean SF and LA?
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Old 02-05-2011, 08:27 PM
 
994 posts, read 1,830,774 times
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I think it also depends on what kind suburbs you are talking about. Inner ring suburbs like Evanston, Oak Park, Cicero, Skokie, etc., have a totally different vibe than outer ring suburbs.

For me I personally just don't understand suburbs and why you would want to live there. I just think it's two very different mentalties with people who have desire to live in the city and people who have a desire to live in the suburbs. There are plenty of ethnic minorities that I have as neighbors who have a house and a large yard and are living that "American Dream". I also know plenty of ethnic minorities who have moved to the suburbs and have a house and a large yard and are also living the "American Dream". I think it just depends if you want more isolation and privacy or more of an urban vibe. Neither is better than the other.

I don't think everyone wants a bigger yard, some people want less. For instance, my mother owns a home, the one I grew up in with a big yard and everything, but she wants out. She wants a condo so she doesn't have to deal with all the hassles. She wants less. Same thing with my father and his house. I think after our horrendous economy people are also starting to realize less is more. Also there are plenty of schools that are on par with suburban schools.
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Old 02-05-2011, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago
4,085 posts, read 4,335,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chikid View Post
For me I personally just don't understand suburbs and why you would want to live there.
It is easy to figure out.

Reason #1 more often than not, better schools than most of the city schools.
Reason #2 to be close to one's job.
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Old 02-05-2011, 08:42 PM
 
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^^^Yes jobs I can understand. However just like a lot of school districts in the city, you have to live in a middle income to wealthy suburb to go to a real good school. I wonder how many schools in Blue Island and South Holland compare to CPS schools. The worst schools in the city are in the poorest neighborhoods. The worst schools in the suburbs are in the poorest suburbs.
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Old 02-05-2011, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Chicago
4,085 posts, read 4,335,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chikid View Post
you have to live in a middle income to wealthy suburb to go to a real good school.
It is like that all over the country.

The topic of this thread is not really Chicago specific.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:56 PM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
4,619 posts, read 8,169,405 times
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There is more to the "whitebread" analogy than just the color.

White bread is softer, and more refined, which was often the case with wealthier suburbs. Many of the suburbs intentionally pushed the idea, too, that they were softer around the edges and more refined - it was a desirable trait. White bread was also associated with people who had relatively more money - why would poor people pay extra for flour just to have the germ removed? Today the cost of raw ingredients is so low that aspect of it just isn't remembered.

Anyway, so while it is partially a racial statement, as with much of American cultural divides, "white bread" concepts go far deeper than just skin color.

I'm not disputing that the suburbs have gotten more diverse, especially racially and ethnically, but I thought I'd point out that it was never only about race.
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Old 02-07-2011, 06:09 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,241 posts, read 7,175,680 times
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Suburban Chicago is getting pretty diverse (as in more non-whites/immigrant) these days.
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Old 02-07-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Lake Arlington Heights, IL
5,479 posts, read 12,263,285 times
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For some of us, it is also living in a less dense area. I do not like the density of Chicago, yet I can appreciate it and realize that is an important component in making city life desirable.
Would I like being able to walk to stores and restaurants? Yes. Would I like to deal with alleys, on street parking and being within 10' of my neighbors house? No. Am I ready for true rural living? No.
So the suburban area I live in suits me well right now. I will reevaluate when the kids have moved on.
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