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Old 12-25-2013, 10:45 AM
 
5,897 posts, read 11,814,628 times
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Check out this map showing age of buildings in Chicago.

Its broken into five categorie: 19th century, 1900-1950, 1950-2000, and 2000 to today.

Chicago Building Age Map | Visual.ly

Just click on whatever set of years (and the legend) to see the patterns.

19th century buildings dominate from just beyond the edge of the core/downtown to about five miles. (IE: Noble Square, WP-Bucktown, Old Town/Lincoln Park/Lakeview, Bridgport, etc.) as well as some further outliers (Austin, Pullman, etc.). In the core, you seem to only find pre 1900 where the loop meets Michigan Ave.

1900-1949:

Dominates everything from about four miles from the loop almost to the edge of the city, where 1950s houses dominate on the far NW, far SW, and far S end corners. Also the loop seems to be dominated by 1900-1949. Near O'Hare theres virtually nothing from pre-1950.

1950-1999:

Far NW, Far SW (AKA: "Cop/city worker-lands"), as well as much of theloop and north lakefront (revitalization during Daley the Ist reign). Also major developements such as UIC/Medical district on near west side, redevelopment of Union stockyards, other industrial zones.

2000-2010:

Looks like shopping centers scattered across the city, as well as well as all the new high rises surrounding loop (west/south loop, River north/streeterville). As well as some infill in the gentrfied north and northwest sides, as well as south lakefront.


Pretty cool.
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Old 12-25-2013, 11:51 PM
 
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very cool map.
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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Nice find!
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Was playing with the map a few days ago. It's really cool - lot of data and very interesting. I also hope they can keep this updated because in some areas older homes are being knocked down to make way for newer homes.

Last edited by marothisu; 12-26-2013 at 09:34 AM..
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Would be interesting to see it broken up into smaller time periods.

In my NW-side enclave, you can see the divide quite clearly just from driving around, and the map certainly confirms it. If you find yourself on a pleasant looking block, construction occurred between 1935-1940. Then all construction in the area stopped for about 10 years due to the war and ensuing recession. When it resumed in the 50's, the only SF housing built were ugly one story ranches, or multi-families on the main arterials. Each building tries to out-ugly the next.

Amazing how quickly architecture took a dive.
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:42 AM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdiddy View Post
Would be interesting to see it broken up into smaller time periods.

In my NW-side enclave, you can see the divide quite clearly just from driving around, and the map certainly confirms it. If you find yourself on a pleasant looking block, construction occurred between 1935-1940. Then all construction in the area stopped for about 10 years due to the war and ensuing recession. When it resumed in the 50's, the only SF housing built were ugly one story ranches, or multi-families on the main arterials. Each building tries to out-ugly the next.

Amazing how quickly architecture took a dive.
Don't diss the midcentury stuff. It's taken for granted here in this city, but the particular style we have here is as unique to Chicago as the Prairie bungalow. Some people complain about them being plain, but minus a cortice the revered kind of multifamilies you find in areas like Sheffield Avenue are just as boxy and unornamented. Not to mention the historic significance in the 50s-60s-70s stuff, being the first large wave of suburbanization and the only one that made an attempt to integrate with the same streets and layout of the rest of Chicago (i.e. the city feel doesn't evaporate when you step onto a block of ranch houses like it does when you step onto an Oak Brook subdivision).

But think as you like.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It'sAutomatic View Post
Don't diss the midcentury stuff. It's taken for granted here in this city, but the particular style we have here is as unique to Chicago as the Prairie bungalow. Some people complain about them being plain, but minus a cortice the revered kind of multifamilies you find in areas like Sheffield Avenue are just as boxy and unornamented. Not to mention the historic significance in the 50s-60s-70s stuff, being the first large wave of suburbanization and the only one that made an attempt to integrate with the same streets and layout of the rest of Chicago (i.e. the city feel doesn't evaporate when you step onto a block of ranch houses like it does when you step onto an Oak Brook subdivision).

But think as you like.
Sure, I suppose you are right in that 50's ranches aren't as terrible as the subdivisions to follow. I can appreciate Meis buildings and some of the high end mid century home designs (one of the best ways to appreciate these homes is to drive through an Oak Brook subdivision to compare the original homes to the teardown McMansion-on-steroids). But, the mass produced ranches are still ugly. No way around it.
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Old 12-26-2013, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Edgewater
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Neat map. Kinda amused that the date on the building in live in is wrong.
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Old 12-27-2013, 06:09 PM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdiddy View Post
Sure, I suppose you are right in that 50's ranches aren't as terrible as the subdivisions to follow. I can appreciate Meis buildings and some of the high end mid century home designs (one of the best ways to appreciate these homes is to drive through an Oak Brook subdivision to compare the original homes to the teardown McMansion-on-steroids). But, the mass produced ranches are still ugly. No way around it.

They're not as attractive as the older stuff in Chicago, but I don't think they're ugly. The bare-bones of them (proportions and lot usage) are still almost the same as 95% of pre-war residential buildings in this city. I just can't get with this out-with-the-old mentality, because that was the trend during the building of our midcentury housing stock and it resulted in the decimation of most of Chicago's inner-city historic neighborhoods.






MidCentury Suburbs Part 6: A catalog of housing types | A Chicago Sojourn


Thanks for the Oak Brook subdivision comment by the way, until now I wasn't aware that Oak Brook had nice midcentury homes.


/threadhijack
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:04 PM
 
Location: 60630
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My building was built in 1909. My son's school was built in 1888 ( the original building ).
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