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Old 01-25-2014, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
15,331 posts, read 23,771,714 times
Reputation: 7419

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It's noticeable, and it's not negligable - I agree. However, that's not a significant temperature difference. Now, if you wanted to bring up Miami, most parts of Texas, Arizona, southern California, etc versus Chicago winters, then I'd completely agree. However, less than 10 degrees is not significant. NYC is still "cold" during winter. There's a difference between noticeable and significant.

 
Old 01-25-2014, 02:45 PM
 
575 posts, read 610,760 times
Reputation: 790
I agree with the OP. The weather sucks. I lived here my entire life but I am out of here when I retire.
 
Old 01-25-2014, 02:46 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,546 posts, read 3,276,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
It's noticeable, and it's not negligable - I agree. However, that's not a significant temperature difference. Now, if you wanted to bring up Miami, most parts of Texas, Arizona, southern California, etc versus Chicago winters, then I'd completely agree. However, less than 10 degrees is not significant. NYC is still "cold" during winter. There's a difference between noticeable and significant.
How about if you add wind chill? Does anyone have those stats? I suspect it would be more than 7-10 degree difference.
 
Old 01-25-2014, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
15,331 posts, read 23,771,714 times
Reputation: 7419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzrovian View Post
How about if you add wind chill? Does anyone have those stats? I suspect it would be more than 7-10 degree difference.
Good point, but the average wind in Manhattan is actually not much different than Chicago, believe it or not last I remembered. It's not a linear change, but the difference wouldn't be that much more. I think the difference comes when you're further out in the city, then Chicago stays windier.
 
Old 01-25-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,546 posts, read 3,276,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mookfish View Post
This weather alone makes this city second tier. What does this city offer that other major cities do not? Half the things are not even doable 8 months of the year(beaches, navy pier, LSD etc.) Cannot wait to move to warm weather. End of rant.
Right because weather is what determines the quality of a city. I guess London (where everyone complains about weather all the time), Montreal and Toronto are all "second tier" while Jacksonville and Tijuana are most definitely "first tier".
 
Old 01-25-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,546 posts, read 3,276,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Good point, but the average wind in NYC is actually not much different than Chicago, believe it or not. It's not a linear change, but the difference wouldn't be that much more. The entire city of NYC actually has a higher average wind speed than Chicago (New York Average Wind Speed City Rank)
What's "not that much"? If it bumps it to around 15 degrees then I think that's quite significant. There is a big difference between 32 and 17.

I don't have any experience with Chicago winters but when I see people around here claiming that it's "not that much different" from NY I find it not credible. Every single person I know who has ever lived in Chicago has said that Chicago winters are "brutal", "suck" etc. In fact that's usually the first and foremost complaint about Chicago that I hear from people who have spent some time there. And these are people who now live in NYC, not Florida. So no, sorry I don't buy it. I am not saying that NY winters are great. I think they suck too, but it appears that Chicago's suck much worse.
 
Old 01-25-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
15,331 posts, read 23,771,714 times
Reputation: 7419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzrovian View Post
What's "not that much"? If it bumps it to around 15 degrees then I think that's quite significant. There is a big difference between 32 and 17.

I don't have any experience with Chicago winters but when I see people around here claiming that it's "not that much different" from NY I find it not credible. Every single person I know who has ever lived in Chicago has said that Chicago winters are "brutal", "suck" etc. In fact that's usually the first and foremost complaint about Chicago that I hear from people who have spent some time there. And these are people who now live in NYC, not Florida. So no, sorry I don't buy it.
I remember seeing some data that showed Manhattan and downtown Chicago pretty similar with average wind speed. I'd have to find the source again.

It's different from NYC in that it's more unpredictable and there's more snow here by about 11-12 inches per year. It is a noticeable difference for sure, but it's in no way a significant difference. It's not like we're talking about Phoenix versus Chicago.

In the end, how much you think it's cold depends on a lot of things such as your personal experience, your health, etc. I grew up in a city where the average high was about what Chicago's average low is. I don't find it terribly cold, but others may. I've been to Arizona before when it was 70 on in a short sleeve shirt while everyone was in jackets and looking at me like I was nuts. They thought it was cold. It's all relative, but the difference between Chicago and NYC in the winter is noticeable but not actually utterly significant.
 
Old 01-25-2014, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
15,331 posts, read 23,771,714 times
Reputation: 7419
Also, according to a page on this site of the 101 windiest cities above 50,000 population, NYC averages 11.1 mph (77th windiest) and Chicago is not listed. The closest city on the list to Chicago is Waukegan which is 10.9 MPH average.

//www.city-data.com/top2/c467.html
 
Old 01-25-2014, 03:20 PM
 
575 posts, read 610,760 times
Reputation: 790
The average January high in Chicago is 5 degrees warmer than that of Minneapolis. So that means Minneapolis is not significantly colder than Chicago?
 
Old 01-25-2014, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
15,331 posts, read 23,771,714 times
Reputation: 7419
It's actually about 8 degrees colder in Minneapolis on average (the lows are over 10 degrees colder in Minneapolis too). It's noticeable, but again, not SIGNIFICANT.
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