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Old 10-21-2017, 07:13 AM
 
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To the original question, no, South Shore is not anywhere close to being up and coming.
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Old 10-21-2017, 09:47 AM
 
Location: The Windy City
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South Shore takes a certain type of resident due to its location. Residents who would be interested in South Shore would be likely to live in places like Beverly and far up by O'Hare. Basically people who want a suburb lifestyle in the city.
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Hellinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Are you sure that South Chicago is worse off than South Shore though?
I remember learning that, when I took a college class on gentrification. The professor said that that South Shore wasn't as hard-hit by urban decay as several other neighborhoods, so the damage isn't as visible now. (One possible reason is that the police presence was stronger, due to high-income people living in Jackson Park Highlands, that didn't want to move away.) South Chicago, on the other hand, was more severely affected by the closure of the South Works steel plant, simply because that's where the plant was. Also, I looked at both neighborhoods on Google Maps: South Shore seems to have a stronger retail vibrancy, especially along 71st Street. I couldn't find an equivalent of that in South Chicago. Correct me if I missed something.

Oh, and I chose the class because all I've been hearing about in school throughout the 90's was urban decay, inner-city gangs, etc. So the idea of a city neighborhood improving seemed really interesting. Of course, college was in early 2000's, so the information I learned about these neighborhoods might be out of date now.
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Old 10-21-2017, 01:19 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 4,548,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I remember learning that, when I took a college class on gentrification. The professor said that that South Shore wasn't as hard-hit by urban decay as several other neighborhoods, so the damage isn't as visible now. (One possible reason is that the police presence was stronger, due to high-income people living in Jackson Park Highlands, that didn't want to move away.) South Chicago, on the other hand, was more severely affected by the closure of the South Works steel plant, simply because that's where the plant was. Also, I looked at both neighborhoods on Google Maps: South Shore seems to have a stronger retail vibrancy, especially along 71st Street. I couldn't find an equivalent of that in South Chicago. Correct me if I missed something.

Oh, and I chose the class because all I've been hearing about in school throughout the 90's was urban decay, inner-city gangs, etc. So the idea of a city neighborhood improving seemed really interesting. Of course, college was in early 2000's, so the information I learned about these neighborhoods might be out of date now.
Both property crime and violent crime are lower in South Chicago than they are in South Shore. The difference isn't negligible, either. Don't let the housing stock fool you. South Shore just *looks* safer.

And of course South Chicago has a retail strip. It's called Commercial Avenue. It actually has quite a few unique businesses and isn't really dead either. Commercial Avenue to me is like a South Side version of 26th Street but with a bit more diversity.

Last edited by EddieOlSkool; 10-21-2017 at 02:15 PM..
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Old 10-24-2017, 02:51 AM
 
6,418 posts, read 5,751,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
Oh, and I chose the class because all I've been hearing about in school throughout the 90's was urban decay, inner-city gangs, etc. So the idea of a city neighborhood improving seemed really interesting. Of course, college was in early 2000's, so the information I learned about these neighborhoods might be out of date now.
Most inner-city neighborhoods in most cities are improving and have been since the 1990s, so you might want to read up on urban issues a little more. Some outer areas are still declining.
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Old 10-24-2017, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Chicago, Little Village
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
Most inner-city neighborhoods in most cities are improving and have been since the 1990s, so you might want to read up on urban issues a little more. Some outer areas are still declining.
Many have but I'm not sure about most. I know incomes have declined in a lot of working-class neighborhoods since the 1990s. I would be surprised if places like Portage Park and Belmont-Craigin have adjusted income levels as high as they did in the 1990s. That doesn't necessarily make them bad, but it's a stretch to say they've improved, IMHO.

Then of course there's the neighborhoods on the South and West sides which have much higher homicide rates than they used to. Most North Side and near south and west side neighborhoods have seen definite improvements and that's what most people here see.
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Old 10-25-2017, 12:13 AM
 
6,418 posts, read 5,751,125 times
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Originally Posted by BRU67 View Post
Many have but I'm not sure about most. I know incomes have declined in a lot of working-class neighborhoods since the 1990s. I would be surprised if places like Portage Park and Belmont-Craigin have adjusted income levels as high as they did in the 1990s. That doesn't necessarily make them bad, but it's a stretch to say they've improved, IMHO.

Then of course there's the neighborhoods on the South and West sides which have much higher homicide rates than they used to. Most North Side and near south and west side neighborhoods have seen definite improvements and that's what most people here see.
I would call Portage Park and Belmont-Cragin outlying areas.

In the 1960s, Lincoln Park was a blighted area except for the couple of blocks along the park itself. The well-to-do part of the city consisted of Lake Shore Drive, Astor, State Parkway, and Dearborn from Division to North Avenue. That's it. Most younger people have absolutely no idea how bad the central city was. But the outer "boroughs" were nicer than they are now.
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Old 10-25-2017, 01:02 AM
 
2,112 posts, read 925,094 times
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Originally Posted by TBideon View Post
To the original question, no, South Shore is not anywhere close to being up and coming.
Gentrification in Chicago has never leapfrogged.

All of Bronzeville and Woodlawn would have to gentrify before South Shore changes, that's a lot, I mean, a lot of area, and it looks like Bronzeville is years away from gentrifying fully, Woodlawn looks like decades away.

Remember, people were talking about Humboldt park and Pilsen gentrifying in the 90's, that's over 20 years ago, and most of those neighborhoods are still jacked up.
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Old 10-25-2017, 08:05 AM
 
Location: alt reality
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No. They tried and failed around the time of the olympic bids. That resulted in a bunch of beautiful buildings being flipped by the cheapest developers on the planet. Ripping out beautiful woodwork. Turning former apartment buildings into 300k-500k condos with the cheapest home depot materials/finishes you can find. They really thought people were going to pay a premium for that crap.

I grew up in South Shore and would love to see it come up. In order for that to happen, the retail has to come up. There is no reason why the residents in South Shore should have to go to Hyde Park or even as far as the South Loop to get decent groceries, dining, clothing, etc.
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Old 10-25-2017, 10:51 AM
 
1,590 posts, read 1,916,801 times
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Well, there is a Jewel on 75th; it's not a complete food desert.
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