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Old 12-04-2019, 08:54 AM
 
1,825 posts, read 978,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smegmatite View Post
I have until recently, its so great when you're not living there I tell ya what. Only thing I miss are my friends, but thankfully with modern technology its pretty easy to keep in touch.
Where do you live now? Also how old were you when you moved away?
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:02 PM
 
Location: ✶✶✶✶
15,140 posts, read 27,958,586 times
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The people who take what this city has to offer the most for granted typically are the ones who have never lived anywhere else. To be fair, Chicago is far from the only place I can say that about.
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:03 PM
 
1,825 posts, read 978,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfre81 View Post
The people who take what this city has to offer the most for granted typically are the ones who have never lived anywhere else. To be fair, Chicago is far from the only place I can say that about.
What are other places you see that attitude as well?
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Old 12-04-2019, 01:00 PM
 
Location: ✶✶✶✶
15,140 posts, read 27,958,586 times
Reputation: 10632
Quote:
Originally Posted by frimpter928 View Post
What are other places you see that attitude as well?
Houston has a great wealth of cultural amenities that is largely ignored by the average local, and until about a decade ago was an inexpensive place to live for what you got in return. It's a lot like Chicago, but without the public transit and the connectedness that comes with it. All that said, even now, it's got a lot that most other places in America do not.

I get a similar impression with people in Los Angeles, which is probably the only other city in America with an economy as diversified as Chicago's. My roommate is from the area.

Here, I deal at work with mostly tourists who are happy to be here for the most part. The people coming in from Iowa and lived there all their life might think it's a dirty, crowded place. The New Yorkers come here see a place that has most of everything their city does, the architecture, the shopping, the theaters, the food, the nightlife etc. but is cleaner and less crowded. The domestic tourists who watch cable news all day ask if they're safe walking Michigan Avenue from the Bean to the Art Institute after dark. The internationals from the Sao Paulos and the Johannesburgs and the Moscows of the world don't. They deal with far worse at home.

Taking benefits about the place where you are for granted is entirely natural. I've been here just long enough to start falling into that rut sometimes. Sometimes I leave work and I'm annoyed that it's raining and there's three blocks to walk to the Blue Line, and there's going to be delayed, and the bum laying across four seats at the end of the car smells like **** and therefore that entire half of the car smells like ****, and there are going to be idiots standing still on the left side of the up escalator out of the Belmont station later, and then I start thinking about what life is like in most of the United States of America if you don't have a car.

It's all about perspective.
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Old 12-05-2019, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
2,849 posts, read 1,148,327 times
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Has anyone lived their whole life in Edison Park (or the neighborhoods nearby, such as Norwood Park and Forest Glen)? I am an outsider, but they seem like they have always maintained a relative consistency (ethnicity, income, high safety level, etc.). As opposed to other areas like Pilsen or the Maxwell Street area which I have seen make changes, over the years... The Edison Park/Norwood Park, Forest Glen were always areas I NEVER explored until rather recently. Which is a bit interesting since technically I pass THOSE areas coming in from Milwaukee. BUT as a child, we never really had a reason to know those areas since they are more residential areas, and not geared for visitors. As an adult, however, I became quite familiar with many other neighborhoods all over the city. That far north/northwest area seems like a part of the city I would consider living.
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Old 12-05-2019, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Chicago
162 posts, read 112,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nearwest View Post
I'm 70 and have lived in Chicago (city) all my life. Have never been tainted by suburbia. My sister and I attended Chicago public schools for both elementary and high school. I think that this fact made us better adults. We came to realize at an early age that not everyone is the same.


Also, I've only resided on the West Side. At the time of my birth, the West Side was viewed as 'Chicago's Mediterranean Sea.' The largest communities of Italians, Greeks, and Jews who lived in the city, were then located on the West Side. This extended west from downtown to the city limits bordering Oak Park and Cicero.
That is an amazing lifetime you have there on the west side. Unfortunate though the drastic changes and downturn that occurred in the area. Thankfully in recent years changes are happening!
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Old 12-05-2019, 01:36 PM
 
Location: In the land beyond Ohare!
1,824 posts, read 1,227,465 times
Reputation: 4858
I'm a lifer.
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Old 12-06-2019, 03:13 PM
 
636 posts, read 271,406 times
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WestSideMillennial: Thanks for the positive feedback.


It's true that much of the West Side was on a downward trajectory starting in the 1950s. This trend seemed to have accelerated after the uprising in April, 1968, along Roosevelt Rd. in North Lawndale, following the assassination of Dr. King.


I read in the either the Sun-Times or the Tribune that the epicenter of violent crime on the West Side is the intersection of Pulaski Rd. and Adams St. (4000W-200S) in West Garfield Park.


This is adjacent to what was considered to be best shopping district on the West Side until roughly 1970. The shopping area was referred to as ' Madison and Crawford' by long-term West Side residents.


I can recommend 2 books concerning the West Side, both of which are available at the Chicago Public Library. One is "Block by Block." The author is Amanda Seligman. The author traces decay and public policy on the West Side from the late 1940s until about 1970.


The other is titled "Redlined." Its author is Linda Gartz. She writes of her parents' decision to remain in West Garfield Park in the 1960s, as that neighborhood underwent racial transition, beginning in 1962. I met Linda at book signing event last year.

Last edited by Nearwest; 12-06-2019 at 03:23 PM..
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Old 12-10-2019, 10:44 AM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
4,576 posts, read 7,209,102 times
Reputation: 6229
I haven't lived here all my life, but I have lived in Chicago longer than any other city, and in Illinois longer than any other state. Adding up all the time I've spent here, I've lived here just over 20.5 years, second only to in and around Portland, where I grew up, which totaled just under 16 years (4 years in Portland, 12 years in a small town an hour outside of Portland). My first 3 years were spent in Boise, where I was born. I spent just over 2.5 years in Indiana for college, and 2.5 years in the Twin Cities. My shortest stint anywhere was the 4 months I lived in the Boston area (Cambridge).

I think I've traveled enough and lived enough different places to be able have an informed opinion on what I want out of a city. And I want what Chicago's got. I have no plan to leave, no desire to leave. There are a precious few cities in the world that could tempt me away, at least temporarily, but we're talking a handful, a handful that mostly come with qualifiers on what it would take to get me there. For example, I wouldn't move to Indianapolis for double what I'm earning now. I would move to New York, but I'd need to make double what I make now. I'd move to Paris for what I earn now, and I'd move to any of the Scandinavian capitals for a good career boost, and maybe Berlin, but nowhere else and the only reason I'd move back to Boise, where my parents now live again, is if I absolutely needed to in order to care for them and even then I'd probably try to make it more of a commuting situation. I really love Chicago, and the time I've spent away from it has only made me appreciate it all the more.

I made a grid of where I've lived, even:

WhereILived by me, hosted on Flickr

Last edited by emathias; 12-10-2019 at 11:02 AM..
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Old 12-10-2019, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,300 posts, read 5,810,636 times
Reputation: 3956
I lived in the Chicago area my entire life. The furthest I have ever escaped was to go to college in Dekalb, IL at NIU which as you're aware wasn't very far away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Jay View Post
Has anyone lived their whole life in Edison Park (or the neighborhoods nearby, such as Norwood Park and Forest Glen)? I am an outsider, but they seem like they have always maintained a relative consistency (ethnicity, income, high safety level, etc.). As opposed to other areas like Pilsen or the Maxwell Street area which I have seen make changes, over the years... The Edison Park/Norwood Park, Forest Glen were always areas I NEVER explored until rather recently. Which is a bit interesting since technically I pass THOSE areas coming in from Milwaukee. BUT as a child, we never really had a reason to know those areas since they are more residential areas, and not geared for visitors. As an adult, however, I became quite familiar with many other neighborhoods all over the city. That far north/northwest area seems like a part of the city I would consider living.
I live in Park Ridge which has a very similar multi-generational population base. My in laws and my sister in law live in PR as well as an Uncle. My backyard neighbor has lived in the SAME house her ENTIRE life and she's in her 50's. Except for when she went away to college. After college she moved back in with her parents and never left. She inherited the house and still never left. Right now her house is being torn down so she can rebuild from the ground up. It must be quite emotional for her to let go of her literal forever home but then again maybe not since it will be much larger and far improved.
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