U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-09-2020, 08:46 AM
 
Location: ✶✶✶✶
15,022 posts, read 27,487,201 times
Reputation: 10401

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by OKParker View Post
I've found that 2 flats built in the southwest (pilsen, little village, bridgeport, mckinley park) are far different and smaller than the 2 flats built directly west, north, south which are far grander.
I saw that too, looking around.

I don't have much stuff. My bedroom is for sleep. So I, personally, was OK with it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-09-2020, 11:13 AM
 
7,192 posts, read 6,642,943 times
Reputation: 6581
I lived in one growing up. We fit 3 twin beds in one of the bedrooms. not much walking space between. somehow we did not mind it. Had a huge walk in pantry, huge eat-in kitchen (now I am spoiled so much that I hate these galley kitchens many apartments have nowadays. Had a very beautiful armoire that was a built in (china cabinet it was called).

had a bank of windows in the frunchroom and a huge back porch which we played out there, was fun!


I survived ok!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2020, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,657 posts, read 2,400,595 times
Reputation: 1767
Wrote this a while back, on why Chicago flats' rooms are often smaller than East Coast rowhouse rooms:
https://www.city-data.com/forum/49775019-post31.html

My favorite apartments were those in courtyard-style buildings, and partly because those weren't tied to the same long & narrow dimensions and had plans that were more square in shape.

BTW, a great resource for vintage Chicago flat floorplans is this 1909 house plan book from a South Side publisher:
https://archive.org/details/Radfords...dings/page/n15
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2020, 07:33 PM
 
749 posts, read 411,026 times
Reputation: 1247
Great post paytonc. As for the rowhomes in the northeast like DC and Philly...do the front of the buildings span 20 feet wide and then cut in to say 17 feet once you get past the front room so you can have a window well and thus 2 bedrooms on the same floor? Or is there simply a v-shaped cut in where the bedrooms are for light and vent? I remember watching the Wire and seeing the Baltimore rowhomes and couldn't believe how narrow they were on the inside.

I wonder why some Chicago lots are 30+ feet wide in certain hoods. How did they get that zoning? If Chicago woulda followed that as standard throughout none of this would be an issue....but then you'd have 20% less housing.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2020, 11:40 AM
 
2,297 posts, read 6,044,610 times
Reputation: 1742
Pilsen/LV was always an industrial, working class area, the housing reflects that. The areas surrounding it had more wealth when they were developed. Garfield Park was the crown jewel of the city at one time, the lower west side never had that reputation.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2020, 12:42 PM
 
749 posts, read 411,026 times
Reputation: 1247
Quote:
Originally Posted by via chicago View Post
Pilsen/LV was always an industrial, working class area, the housing reflects that. The areas surrounding it had more wealth when they were developed. Garfield Park was the crown jewel of the city at one time, the lower west side never had that reputation.
I'm surprised about Garfield Park. The housing stock in there doesn't reflect the crown jewel status you speak of there with quite a bit of row homes and shallow homes. Washington and Warren have beautiful 3 flats but the rest are pretty average. I always thought the south side had the best housing stock since that's where the wealthy escaped to get outta the city. The mansions and greystones in parts of Bronzeville and certainly Kenwood and Hyde Park are gorgeous.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2020, 03:59 PM
 
458 posts, read 274,003 times
Reputation: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtcbnd03 View Post
I'm surprised about Garfield Park. The housing stock in there doesn't reflect the crown jewel status you speak of there with quite a bit of row homes and shallow homes. Washington and Warren have beautiful 3 flats but the rest are pretty average. I always thought the south side had the best housing stock since that's where the wealthy escaped to get outta the city. The mansions and greystones in parts of Bronzeville and certainly Kenwood and Hyde Park are gorgeous.
Garfield Park has some beautiful homes and washington + warren definitely have beautiful 3 flats. There are a few mansions sprinkled throughout.

A great book i have (https://www.amazon.com/Houses-Chicag.../dp/0926494392) talks about the west/south/north side in detail and you'll definitely find the best homes on the southside for the first few decades after the fire. But the wealthy soon realized that they could smell the stockyards in Bronzeville, so they started moving to Gold Coast (mostly here) and the west side (for the transit).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2020, 08:40 AM
 
8,279 posts, read 10,234,498 times
Reputation: 9987
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtcbnd03 View Post
Great post paytonc. As for the rowhomes in the northeast like DC and Philly...do the front of the buildings span 20 feet wide and then cut in to say 17 feet once you get past the front room so you can have a window well and thus 2 bedrooms on the same floor? Or is there simply a v-shaped cut in where the bedrooms are for light and vent? I remember watching the Wire and seeing the Baltimore rowhomes and couldn't believe how narrow they were on the inside.

I wonder why some Chicago lots are 30+ feet wide in certain hoods. How did they get that zoning? If Chicago woulda followed that as standard throughout none of this would be an issue....but then you'd have 20% less housing.
I definitely prefer a Chicago bungalow to a Philly/Balt row house. Many of those row house neighborhoods are extremely depressing, economically and physically..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2020, 10:29 AM
 
3,991 posts, read 6,470,466 times
Reputation: 2373
I dislike the buildings with the living room in front and the bedrooms on each side with a long tube like hall way that leads to a kitchen and eating area in the back. I prefer a two flat to be like a bungalow floor plan. My two flat is exactly like a stacked bungalow. The only problem with it is the kitchen is a bit small, although it has a big walk in pantry, and the entrance to the apartment makes it impossible to make a huge combined dining/ living room like some bungalows have. It does have a huge 18x20 ft living room and a generously sized dining room. One flat is as big as the house my grandparents had and bigger than the house I grew up in was. My son is thinking of someday if needed to converting it to a single family home. He would use the upstairs living room for the master bedroom. He would still have some small bedrooms on each floor. The upstairs kitchen would be converted easily to a laundry room by pulling out the refrigerator and stove and adding new countertops. He would not really even need to move any walls. The front and back stairwells are enclosed in the building. The bathrooms would have to be gutted and redone but they would still be small. Of course he would lose the rent money which would be bad.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2020, 03:12 PM
 
905 posts, read 577,441 times
Reputation: 1282
Most classic Chicago two flats are built on 30 foot wide lots, not 25, at least in my experience in North Center/Lincoln Square. Of the many dozens in my neighborhood, I can think of only one on the narrower lot size.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top