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Old 05-01-2021, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
2,833 posts, read 1,135,171 times
Reputation: 2206

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If it ever happens, it will be something to celebrate.

I'm pretty certain that those areas were clean and safe during THE GREAT DEPRESSION (so it can't be just about the economy).

I'm pretty sure that those areas were clean and safe during PROHIBITION ( so it can't be just about booze, crimes, and gangs).

I truly wish it could go back!
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Old 05-01-2021, 11:36 AM
 
1,618 posts, read 1,965,169 times
Reputation: 1920
Pre 1940s most neighborhoods throughout US cities were functional and working class, with a few impoverished and wealthy interspersed.

Then the War happened, other countries rebuilt themselves rapidly, US suburbs proliferated and cannibalized their and other core cities, the war on drugs and outsourcing jobs decimated economies, and the single family underclass culture took off - and hasn't looked back since.

A return to the good old days just isn't possible unless new residents who give a flying f about the neighborhood arrive.
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Old 05-01-2021, 01:08 PM
 
10 posts, read 629 times
Reputation: 15
A grocery store is coming to north lawndale, which borders EGP

https://blockclubchicago.org/2021/04...h-food-access/
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Old 05-01-2021, 01:11 PM
 
10 posts, read 629 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRU67 View Post
Whether it's Kujo7 or whoever, I don't care. They just need to get in there - to live. Visiting for one day and then saying you understand how good people in the 'hood are because you met one or two isn't going to change things.
I grew up in the hood and there are lots of good people in the hood. You don't need to live somewhere to know there are decent people. I never lived in Peru but I'm pretty sure there are lots of good people there.
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Old 05-01-2021, 01:48 PM
 
634 posts, read 268,978 times
Reputation: 1109
I can recommend 2 books regarding the West Side. Both of them are available from the Chicago Public Library.

One is "Block by Block", which was written by Amanda Seligman. The author traces decay and public policy on the West Side from the late 1940s until roughly 1970. There is a chapter in this book which focuses on the efforts of West Garfield Park residents to stem racial change in the early 1960s.

The other book is "Redlined". It's author is Linda Gartz, who grew up in West Garfield Park. She writes of her parents' decision to remain in that neighborhood, as racial transition began there about 1963.

I met Linda at a book signing event.
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Old 05-02-2021, 11:27 AM
 
Location: ✶✶✶✶
15,139 posts, read 27,933,120 times
Reputation: 10627
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBideon View Post
A return to the good old days just isn't possible unless new residents who give a flying f about the neighborhood arrive.
They're around, and you know when one lives on the street. You'll see them out cleaning up trash and making their block look better than the others around it. These were folks who helped me get my Census work done over there. I learned more about the area from them than I ever will on a place like this. People get a lot more "pro-social" when you treat them with respect.


Now, as to why I might not want to move over there, it's a lack of not only quality grocery options but quality housing. Going into some of those buildings to count people put some stuff into a perspective. For one, I'm glad my landlord isn't like the ones over there. For another, it's a bit easier to see why people who are living in a place like that aren't compelled to care much more about the neighborhood than their landlord cares about the place where they lay their head.

East of the actual park named Garfield, it starts getting better the further east you go, toward the United Center. There's some newer development over there, particularly east of Kedzie. You've got Pete's Fresh Market at Western/Madison not too far off.
It's tough sledding west of there. Even this new store in North Lawndale, while that's definitely a good pickup for the folks along Ogden, I saw for myself that's still a haul from Garfield Park. That would be like if I, here in Belmont Gardens, had to ride out to the Marianos in Roscoe Village for a place to get some fresh food. But I can walk to the Cermak in the Fields in five minutes instead. That wouldn't be the case if I lived in Garfield.

One day toward the end of working down there, I sat down in front of one of the little corner stores that passes for a grocery in Fifth City, somewhere near the CTA garage, part to take a load off for a bit and part to upload some info. Sat there maybe 6-8 minutes. Might have been on Kedzie, or Homan, don't remember exactly where. I had been hiking the West Side for Uncle Sam for two weeks by then, seven days a week, and was tired and hungry.
What I do remember is this:

-A man comes either from out of the store or from around the corner, hands me a cup of taffy grapes and says something to the effect of "Thank you for being out here, God bless" to which I replied with similar gratitude
-A lady walks up, sees my Census bag and asks how she can get her household counted, to which I obliged

In comparison, my own area over here regarded me as if I was an Amway salesman or something. On the West Side, they want representation however it comes.


I did see a fight in front of a church somewhere around the tracks on Kenton in WGP, and a bunch of girls running away screaming that one of them had a gun. No shots. I just watched as three or four CPD squad cars swooped in and broke it up. I was headed to a case across the street, and decided I'd hit it on my way back through, and I did.


With all its problems, I'd move to WGP any day and twice on Sunday (and today's Sunday) before I moved back to the east side of Dayton, Ohio where I lived for about two years. Hillbilly tweaker sleaze that proves that lowlifes come in as much a variety of colors as Skittles.
And even there, there's good folks trying to make it.
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Old 05-09-2021, 11:27 AM
 
476 posts, read 307,685 times
Reputation: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfre81 View Post
They're around, and you know when one lives on the street. You'll see them out cleaning up trash and making their block look better than the others around it. These were folks who helped me get my Census work done over there. I learned more about the area from them than I ever will on a place like this. People get a lot more "pro-social" when you treat them with respect.


Now, as to why I might not want to move over there, it's a lack of not only quality grocery options but quality housing. Going into some of those buildings to count people put some stuff into a perspective. For one, I'm glad my landlord isn't like the ones over there. For another, it's a bit easier to see why people who are living in a place like that aren't compelled to care much more about the neighborhood than their landlord cares about the place where they lay their head.

East of the actual park named Garfield, it starts getting better the further east you go, toward the United Center. There's some newer development over there, particularly east of Kedzie. You've got Pete's Fresh Market at Western/Madison not too far off.
It's tough sledding west of there. Even this new store in North Lawndale, while that's definitely a good pickup for the folks along Ogden, I saw for myself that's still a haul from Garfield Park. That would be like if I, here in Belmont Gardens, had to ride out to the Marianos in Roscoe Village for a place to get some fresh food. But I can walk to the Cermak in the Fields in five minutes instead. That wouldn't be the case if I lived in Garfield.

One day toward the end of working down there, I sat down in front of one of the little corner stores that passes for a grocery in Fifth City, somewhere near the CTA garage, part to take a load off for a bit and part to upload some info. Sat there maybe 6-8 minutes. Might have been on Kedzie, or Homan, don't remember exactly where. I had been hiking the West Side for Uncle Sam for two weeks by then, seven days a week, and was tired and hungry.
What I do remember is this:

-A man comes either from out of the store or from around the corner, hands me a cup of taffy grapes and says something to the effect of "Thank you for being out here, God bless" to which I replied with similar gratitude
-A lady walks up, sees my Census bag and asks how she can get her household counted, to which I obliged

In comparison, my own area over here regarded me as if I was an Amway salesman or something. On the West Side, they want representation however it comes.


I did see a fight in front of a church somewhere around the tracks on Kenton in WGP, and a bunch of girls running away screaming that one of them had a gun. No shots. I just watched as three or four CPD squad cars swooped in and broke it up. I was headed to a case across the street, and decided I'd hit it on my way back through, and I did.


With all its problems, I'd move to WGP any day and twice on Sunday (and today's Sunday) before I moved back to the east side of Dayton, Ohio where I lived for about two years. Hillbilly tweaker sleaze that proves that lowlifes come in as much a variety of colors as Skittles.
And even there, there's good folks trying to make it.
Yep, most people even in bad areas are great people and often warmer than those in the nicest areas. There is a minority of residents who cause the trouble and unfortunately, that minority is larger in the bad areas and wreaks all the havoc.

Also, EGP is definitely on the path to gentrification in 20 years. Some small scale and moderate scale developments filling 5th avenue and Madison will spark that area into United Center (the resi portion) levels of gentrification with the park serving as a natural boundary between gentrification and the existing poverty. WGP has 40 years before it gentrifies if all goes well for the city. So much vacant land, dilapidating housing stock, and existing poverty will make that area struggle to turn around any time soon. I think humboldt park (the western portion) might even gentrify before WGP.
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Old 05-09-2021, 11:59 AM
 
931 posts, read 535,086 times
Reputation: 1514
Quote:
Originally Posted by OKParker View Post
Also, EGP is definitely on the path to gentrification in 20 years.
Depending on how much remote work disrupts Chicago urban living, EGP will fully gentrify in the next 5-10 years. Since the 2008 crash...or last 13 years...we have seen the entire Milwaukee corridor gentrify from West Town up to Avondale. We have also seen the entire West Loop transform from a meatpacking district into the hottest hood in the city.

If that trend continues over the next 10 years EGP will easily fill in. I expect with the nationwide housing shortage and low Chicago COL it will. Fully renovated properties east of California are selling very fast and trending up in price points to recently gentrified hoods. The only thing EGP is missing is a retail corridor. If it had something like 26th street in Little Village...look out!
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Old Yesterday, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Wheaton, MD
20 posts, read 1,954 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtcbnd03 View Post
Depending on how much remote work disrupts Chicago urban living, EGP will fully gentrify in the next 5-10 years. Since the 2008 crash...or last 13 years...we have seen the entire Milwaukee corridor gentrify from West Town up to Avondale. We have also seen the entire West Loop transform from a meatpacking district into the hottest hood in the city.

If that trend continues over the next 10 years EGP will easily fill in. I expect with the nationwide housing shortage and low Chicago COL it will. Fully renovated properties east of California are selling very fast and trending up in price points to recently gentrified hoods. The only thing EGP is missing is a retail corridor. If it had something like 26th street in Little Village...look out!
I don't know man, sounds extremely ambitious. I'm thinking of an article from awhile back showing that white people in Chicago are very unwilling to move to a black neighborhood in contrast to those other areas which were mostly Latino.
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Old Yesterday, 10:49 AM
 
1,618 posts, read 1,965,169 times
Reputation: 1920
That's actually a very interesting topic. It's pretty complex, and to some polarizing, but a lot stems from Latino neighborhoods never having comparable scales of (1) riots, (2) mass commercial disinvestments, (3) single family proliferations, (4) evangelical/race-baiting hustling, (5) crime, and (6) white flight. The Logan Squares, Avondales, Lincoln Parks - they just never fell off the cliff like the Roselands, Englewoods, and Marquette Parks, and so it was easier for them to rebound (to varying degree).

There are even religious connections, in that Latinos often moved into historically Catholic neighborhoods, and a lot of the existing white residents stuck around longer or, even when fleeing to other neighborhoods or suburbs, would visit and help maintain neighborhood stability during a few difficult decades. Sure there was still bad crime, gangs, disinvestment, poor schools - but there were local economies (think East Village in the 70s and 26th street today) that contributed to a continuous, multi-generational economy and stability, making the areas interesting for other groups to visit, invest in, and even move to.
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