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Old 04-01-2009, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
212 posts, read 646,706 times
Reputation: 82

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I just signed a lease at Aqua for a unit on a dog floor! There's not a weight limit for my unit, but I think I want to stay on the smaller side so I don't seriously limit where I can move to later on (since most apts that allow dogs have a weight limit).

My wife has been looking at the poo varieties (e.g., cavapoo, cockapoo) and likes them a lot. But we're not sure how well they'd do in a convertible apartment, alone for 8.5 hours a day. But we still have little idea what we're going to get.

Does anyone have suggestions on breeds and/or breeders?
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Chicago- Lawrence and Kedzie/Maywood
2,242 posts, read 5,834,035 times
Reputation: 736
Get a pit.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Chicago
6,025 posts, read 14,371,827 times
Reputation: 8124
avoid these so-called "hybrid breeds" aka overpriced mutts. unless of course you're going to adopt one from a shelter or rescue. the vast majority of these dogs are ill bred and only exist to add money to a breeder's pocket

there are people who work full time that own dogs, but you need to work hard and spend some cash to make it work. most people use dog day cares, some crate the dogs and have a dog walker come in mid day to walk the dog. either way, unless you live in a house where the dog has access to a yard via a dog door, you can't leave most dogs alone w/o a potty break for that much time

best bet is to do some serious research. there are online tools that are questionnaires that can help you narrow down a breed based on activity level, housing, grooming requirements, etc. these should give you an idea to springboard from. check out lots of books and websites on the breeds you're interested in and general dog care. if you use a breeder, do serious research. good breeders will likely have a waiting list so this isn't an instant gratification thing. AVOID pet stores like the plague! ditto BYBs (to give you an idea of what these people are like, look up the recent South Side puppy mill bust where dogs were being kept in birdcages!). in the end, you may end up finding the perfect mutt in a shelter, so try not too focus too much on a specific breed.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Chicago
15,587 posts, read 25,033,621 times
Reputation: 1761
Ask Obama.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Lincoln Park
838 posts, read 2,927,368 times
Reputation: 172
nice bldg. how much do the one beds go for on the dog floor?
Quote:
Originally Posted by manchesterUnited View Post
I just signed a lease at Aqua for a unit on a dog floor! There's not a weight limit for my unit, but I think I want to stay on the smaller side so I don't seriously limit where I can move to later on (since most apts that allow dogs have a weight limit).

My wife has been looking at the poo varieties (e.g., cavapoo, cockapoo) and likes them a lot. But we're not sure how well they'd do in a convertible apartment, alone for 8.5 hours a day. But we still have little idea what we're going to get.

Does anyone have suggestions on breeds and/or breeders?
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Old 04-02-2009, 12:04 AM
 
1,251 posts, read 2,327,810 times
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I know this isn't much help, but look for a "dumb" dog. The smarter the dog, the more easily it gets bored and turns to destructive behavior to entertain itself (or express its boredom) when left to its own devices. Just my experiences. Border collies and a doberman pincer in my case. But hey, I think all dogs can be trained to behave exceptionally if the owner is willing to invest the time & money.
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Old 04-02-2009, 12:46 AM
 
170 posts, read 500,963 times
Reputation: 61
I highly suggest adopting. We adopted our dog in Ohio, but we got our cat from PAWS. Great experience, there. They have many different sizes of dogs, too.
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Old 04-02-2009, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
212 posts, read 646,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
avoid these so-called "hybrid breeds" aka overpriced mutts. unless of course you're going to adopt one from a shelter or rescue. the vast majority of these dogs are ill bred and only exist to add money to a breeder's pocket
That's why I was asking for breeders. I would guess there are some breeders of these "hybrid breeds" have at least few generations of dogs so they actually have some better idea of health concerns. As for being overpriced mutts, how do you think many of the well-known "pure breeds" came about?

Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
there are people who work full time that own dogs, but you need to work hard and spend some cash to make it work. most people use dog day cares, some crate the dogs and have a dog walker come in mid day to walk the dog. either way, unless you live in a house where the dog has access to a yard via a dog door, you can't leave most dogs alone w/o a potty break for that much time
Can anyone else comment on this? I've raised dogs throughout my entire life, as has most of my family, and we've hardly ever had issues leaving them at home during a full-time job. Though, we've raised larger dogs. Is this a more realistic concern for smaller dogs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
best bet is to do some serious research. there are online tools that are questionnaires that can help you narrow down a breed based on activity level, housing, grooming requirements, etc. these should give you an idea to springboard from.
In my experience raising larger dogs it's only somewhat helpful to read books/websites on certain breeds. You can get a much better grasp of expectations from speaking to previous/current owners from a specific breeder.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Logan Square
1,912 posts, read 5,072,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manchesterUnited View Post
Can anyone else comment on this? I've raised dogs throughout my entire life, as has most of my family, and we've hardly ever had issues leaving them at home during a full-time job. Though, we've raised larger dogs. Is this a more realistic concern for smaller dogs?

I have an englsh bulldog. i take him out at 7:30 before I leave and again at 5:30 when I get home. he has never had an accident and I crated him as a puppy. Puppies however will need to go out significantly more than their adult counterparts because their bladders are small. If you do not want to get a dog walker from 8 weeks until about 15 months in most breeds than you should be prepared to bathe your dog nightly and clean up all sorts of messes.

I would recommend getting a dog 1 year or older from a pound. We have many many dogs in this city and around the country with wonderful temperaments that are perfect for apartment living that can be found at SPCAs and PAWs. The volunteers and vets make sure all dogs have their basic training and are very well socialized so any dog you get from these facilities will not have any aggression issues. There are also breed specific rescues. I fostered a Saint Bernard from one of these for 3 years and she was so grateful just to have a loving home after years of abuse.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Tower Grove East, St. Louis, MO
12,063 posts, read 29,547,449 times
Reputation: 3777
Most dogs, if crate trained, can easily make it 8 or so hours on their own. At most you could hire a dog walker to take the pup out at the lunch hour.

My mom has a cockapoo and she's quite the little lap dog, which is what you want, but they have a few breed issues you might want to be aware of -- cockers are notoriously slow potty trainers and poodles tend to be better with people than other dogs -- the need to be socialized with other dogs early and often or they can end up possessive and rather mean. They require regular grooming as their hair is quite long, but they don't shed too much. They bark -- well yap -- a lot. Like a lot. They're no hound dog or anything, but they're the type to bark out the window at nothing all day.

I think there are really a few key things to look at for an apartment dog -- You want a dog that is relatively inactive indoors (the quintessential lap dog), that doesn't bark too much and is good with other people and dogs.

My SO and I did a lot of research and based on those characteristics as well as our mistrust of ourselves to regularly take the dog to the groomers, we chose a Boston Terrier. We liked the first one so much the next summer we got another. They really fit all the above requirements to a T (plus we think they're freakin' adorable).

No dog is perfect, but the things we can't stand about ours: Sensitive tummies -- they tend to be little farters! Those little flat noses make them unprepared for weather extremes and they tend to sneeze and huff and snore. They're smart and eager to please -- as well as surprisingly easy to train and reactive to the sound of our voices (either loving or stern) -- but they both get occasionally willful -- they're more intelligent than average and I'm pretty sure their willful streak is because of this. And they're little destroyers! My little sub 20 pound dogs can take those tough $8 dog toys made for labs and shepherds and rip them apart in amazing time -- they have this ability to find something's weak spot and exploit it and they don't quit until all the insides are spilled on the floor! They'll chew bones for hours at a time without stopping.

And seriously? They must sleep AT LEAST 18-21 hours a day. They are amazingly lazy.
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