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Old 02-28-2012, 07:10 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I've heard this before, often either by people who are totally unfamiliar with Christianity in general, have been exposed to some fundamentalist or are fundamentalists themselves. I know it's a minority viewpoint, but recently someone said his mother was 'not Christian but Roman Catholic' which sounded a bit weird since of course the Catholics were there before the Protestants.

I'm not Catholic myself, but is the reason for this merely sectarian anti-Catholicism? Or are there fundamental reasons why some non Catholics might not see Catholics as real Christians? I.e. by believing in works, intercession of the saints, believing in the apocrypha, 'worshipping' the Virgin Mary, following papal authority, by often being Catholic in name but not in nature.

I'm also wondering who are the most adversely anti-Catholic? Evangelicals, Methodists, JW's, Anglicans? In the UK, for instance, there's a surprising amount of anti Catholic sentiment among the older generation, even those who are casually religious or even non-religious, largely due to cultural reasons. Has the South, with a few exceptions (Louisiana, South Texas) always been pretty anti-Catholic?

 
Old 02-28-2012, 07:34 AM
 
Location: NY
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Catholics are not the only Chrisitans who some fundamentalists believe are wrong, or not really "saved" Christians. The differences in interpretation of scripture, theology, and custom/practice bring people to doubt the faith of other denominational churches.

I think Catholocism just tends to be the biggest target for some fundamentalists (or easiest target) since it has such a large presence and congregation.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 07:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post

I'm not Catholic myself, but is the reason for this merely sectarian anti-Catholicism? Or are there fundamental reasons why some non Catholics might not see Catholics as real Christians? I.e. by believing in works, intercession of the saints, believing in the apocrypha, 'worshipping' the Virgin Mary, following papal authority, by often being Catholic in name but not in nature.
I am always amazed at how much weight non-Catholics apply to the above.

If you go to mass Sundays after Sunday or every day for that matter you will see that the mass is 100% centered on Christ.

The virgin and saints are not God. Enough said. These are ornaments and traditions of the oldest original Christian religion in the world.

The Pope is the CEO of the church. We have ONE church with one dogma. We are united as the original Church founded by Jesus. Central authority is important and that is why on the other side you see more than 33,000 Protestant sects with new ones opening up every day. That is why they have NO TRADITION.

Catholicism is also part of the culture of many Europeans, Americans, and Latin Americans. Catholicism is part of Western Civilization history and probably the most important institution in the world over the last 2000 years. There are 1.2 billion Catholics in the world and that type of achievement is without precedent in Western Civilization. To that number you can add the Protestant Chrostians who would not be Christians if not for the efforts of the catholic Church during the first 1000 years.

The Protestant are descendants of Catholics and the Sola Scriptura they worship was provided to them by the RCC in the 4th century.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Florida
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I agree that Catholics are victims of overwhelming Constantine /NIcea distorted bureaucracy, albeit perverted doctrines and trapped in unexplainable dogma that leaves them talking and talking in circles justifying their manufactured philosphies,mysticism and reading into scripture that just lacks reality. With that said, I believe Catholicism IS a Christian faith! Why? because they whole heartedly believe in the Son of God . They repent admittedly via an odd method ie,confession, but alas repent never-the-less. They have the Godhead understood and are saved by believing and grace ! Their sins (we are all sinners) and their blashemy (mediators) are what Jesus died for. It will take some major Holy Spirit intervention to make sense of their baptism,Eucharistic sacrifice,saints criteria, (all believers are saints),catechism,ritualistic ceremony (pagan),indulgences,intercessory prayer,Mariology (iconization building to divinity building to intercessor and building and building ) Anyway, as I watch the good people on EWTN I realize they draw analogies that originate seemingly from mystical nonsense yet they are joyful in their revelations as if they are only confined to their body. We all must love and accept Cathoics as christian and pray their new inroads to scripture will uncover the perversions of the early church fathers who set them up an inherited "religion".Catholicism has done great works,their clergy devoted their lives to God via vocation and love of Jesus. Wonderful nuns and lay teachers leaving a lagacy of sweet memories of grade school and activities that are examples of community (,social interaction) and childhood development. Helping the poor,missions kindness and all the energies cannot be just tossed into the street . They are a faith "under construction" just as many christian faiths are not by we critics but by the Holy Spiirt!
God bless Catholicism!

Das

Last edited by DASULAR17; 02-28-2012 at 08:08 AM..
 
Old 02-28-2012, 07:54 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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^ Definitely, I actually wish Protestants would acknowledge Mary a bit more, although I disagree that she is sinless...she's like any human being but was a vessel chosen by God for a very special purpose, as was Moses, David.etc.

I do find serious Catholics pretty attached to dogma - in terms of the fundamentals they are definitely just as sincere in their beliefs as Protestants.

I think a lot of anti-Catholicism is actually historical and related to English-speaking identity. England and Scotland in the late 1600s was a vehemently anti-Catholic place; this transferred into the 13 colonies, with the demographics of the East coast only changing with mass migration from Ireland, Italy.etc.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 08:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
^ Definitely, I actually wish Protestants would acknowledge Mary a bit more, although I disagree that she is sinless...she's like any human being but was a vessel chosen by God for a very special purpose, as was Moses, David.etc.

I do find serious Catholics pretty attached to dogma - in terms of the fundamentals they are definitely just as sincere in their beliefs as Protestants.

I think a lot of anti-Catholicism is actually historical and related to English-speaking identity. England and Scotland in the late 1600s was a vehemently anti-Catholic place; this transferred into the 13 colonies, with the demographics of the East coast only changing with mass migration from Ireland, Italy.etc.
Most Protestants define their dogma on how not to be like the catholic Church. So it is essential for them to have the RCC as a punching bag to justify who they are. Without the RCC there is no Protestantism.

Most of the critique of the RCC is ignorant rant by folks that know nothing about theology.

Interestingly many Protestant ministers that get deep into theology end up converting to Catholicism even though they lose the their job as ministers..
 
Old 02-28-2012, 08:10 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by Julian658 View Post
Most Protestants define their dogma on how not to be like the catholic Church. So it is essential for them to have the RCC as a punching bag to justify who they are. Without the RCC there is no Protestantism.

Most of the critique of the RCC is ignorant rant by folks that know nothing about theology.

Interestingly many Protestant ministers that get deep into theology end up converting to Catholicism even though they lose the their job as ministers..
Protestantism basically is RC stripped of some of it's traditions and the power structure of the Church hierarchy. I believe a lot of Protestant churches hold to some beliefs that were developed in early Christianity (e.g. Council of Nicaea) that are Catholic theological developments. I think at least some of that understanding comes from tradition, as it's impossible to know 100% what the Bible meant in parts.

Yes Protestantism - the very name 'protest' - against RC began as a breakaway movement. For the most part, however, I think most Protestants don't really give Catholics or Catholicism much thought anymore. Against the onslaught of atheism, other faiths and humanist secularism, Protestants and Catholics are probably more united than ever before.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Southern California
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I'm so tired of this. There has been many, many threads about this very subject many, many times before, even quite recently, on this forum. I thought this was settled.

But anyways: Only those who are insecure about their own faith or unsure of their own truth has to question or attack others. Besides, protestants are still protesting: knowing in their hearts that the RCC is the first and original church (and some even teach that the RCC was the first, original church, but "Apostasized"), they have to justify to themselves why they are not a member of it. It is a form of insecurity that, for some, turns into an obsession.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Southern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
^ Definitely, I actually wish Protestants would acknowledge Mary a bit more, although I disagree that she is sinless...she's like any human being but was a vessel chosen by God for a very special purpose, as was Moses, David.etc.

I do find serious Catholics pretty attached to dogma - in terms of the fundamentals they are definitely just as sincere in their beliefs as Protestants.

I think a lot of anti-Catholicism is actually historical and related to English-speaking identity. England and Scotland in the late 1600s was a vehemently anti-Catholic place; this transferred into the 13 colonies, with the demographics of the East coast only changing with mass migration from Ireland, Italy.etc.
Trimac, you hit the nail right on the head here!! The USA for may decades was an anti-Catholic country and even seen by some of its early settlers as a "model protestant nation." In some states in the past Catholics were treated as second-class citizens. The result was, until recently, a very bias and anti-Catholic curricula in the public schools, that probably helped produced a lot of the anti-Catholic evangelicals/fundies today who see history through a narrow prism.
 
Old 02-28-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by cmforte View Post
Trimac, you hit the nail right on the head here!! The USA for may decades was an anti-Catholic country and even seen by some of its early settlers as a "model protestant nation." In some states in the past Catholics were treated as second-class citizens. The result was, until recently, a very bias and anti-Catholic curricula in the public schools, that probably helped produced a lot of the anti-Catholic evangelicals/fundies today who see history through a narrow prism.
Definitely, the US and UK never had the largeish Catholic plurality of say Australia. Many of our earliest convicts were actually Irish. For instance, we've had many Irish Catholic Prime Ministers. The US has had one Catholic president. Irish culture has been very influential in Australian history and culture. Yes, there was once division between Catholics and Protestants, but that's in the distant past now.
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