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Old 03-18-2015, 07:58 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,205 times
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Hello all.

I was looking at renting an apartment in Wyoming and had a few questions. I currently live in Mount Lookout, but I have a new job where I work as a contractor, so where I may be going to in Cincinnati could change as where I'm being contracted with changes. So I wanted to move somewhere more central and with easier access to the highway.

Wyoming was one of the places I looked at, and overall I liked the area, but I had some concerns about the nearby railroad. One place I was looking at is a few blocks from the railroad tracks, south of Wyoming Ave. Anyone on here give me more info on this? How noisy is this? Would I have to be worried about hearing train horns at night? I don't think I would really mind during the day, but that **** waking me up at night would be a deal breaker.

Any other relevant info/experiences on Wyoming would be welcome.

Thanks!
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:20 AM
 
2,886 posts, read 4,317,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalortpor View Post
Hello all.

I was looking at renting an apartment in Wyoming and had a few questions. I currently live in Mount Lookout, but I have a new job where I work as a contractor, so where I may be going to in Cincinnati could change as where I'm being contracted with changes. So I wanted to move somewhere more central and with easier access to the highway.

Wyoming was one of the places I looked at, and overall I liked the area, but I had some concerns about the nearby railroad. One place I was looking at is a few blocks from the railroad tracks, south of Wyoming Ave. Anyone on here give me more info on this? How noisy is this? Would I have to be worried about hearing train horns at night? I don't think I would really mind during the day, but that **** waking me up at night would be a deal breaker.

Any other relevant info/experiences on Wyoming would be welcome.

Thanks!
Only one brief anecdote: on Monday at 11:30 am I met some friends for lunch at Gabby's, right by the tracks. During the hour and a half I was there, I was surprised at the amount of train traffic. At one point, there were trains on the tracks going both directions. I didn't keep count, but that appears to be a busy stretch.
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Old 03-18-2015, 09:30 AM
 
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Yes. You will hear train noise, including overnight.
Some people get used to it. I grew up with it so it doesn't bother me.
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Old 03-18-2015, 04:20 PM
 
909 posts, read 1,184,364 times
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That particular track from Cincinnati to Hamilton has the most tonnage/day of any 10+mile stretch of track in the US that is not within 50 miles of an ocean port, according to Trains magazine. One reason for this is that many tracks through the Appalachians have severe height restrictions, and this track is along the oldest path that had tunnels heightened or bypassed. However, as more height restrictions are being dealt with on many tracks, taller freight cars and double-stacked container will be able to take more direct paths to where they're going, and not all of those direct paths will be through Cincinnati.
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Old 03-18-2015, 05:10 PM
 
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Wyoming is built in the middle of the busiest industrial corridor in 200 miles in any direction. Trains, trucks, cars, air pollution, sewerage, you name it. Like having a home in the parking lot of a factory. How the houses got there in the first place it a mystery to me. Perhaps is was executive housing for the captains of that industry. Close to their mills and factories. Everything else around it is worker housing, built to house the laborers of industry.
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Old 03-18-2015, 06:03 PM
 
Location: OH
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This is really interesting! Is this a n-s line, e-w, or an intersection of many? How far out of Wyoming, going eastish, would you need to be to lessen the noise and pollution? Is Reading far enough? Sharonville?
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,812 posts, read 11,968,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Wyoming is built in the middle of the busiest industrial corridor in 200 miles in any direction. Trains, trucks, cars, air pollution, sewerage, you name it. Like having a home in the parking lot of a factory. How the houses got there in the first place it a mystery to me. Perhaps is was executive housing for the captains of that industry. Close to their mills and factories. Everything else around it is worker housing, built to house the laborers of industry.
A taxidermist has a gutted moose carcass on the workbench along with an order from a museum.
The host(ess) of a child's birthday party has the open bottom of a papier-mache (sp?) donkey facing upwards from the kitchen table, and five full sacks of candy at the ready.
Someone with low to no info about a place, and an inexplicably deep attitude problem toward at least one of its natives, posts hyperbole-laden nonsense about it in an online forum intended to provide useful insights.
In all three cases, the next thing the person should do is STUFF IT.

The nature of how sound carries can't be readily explained, at least by me. But there are many locations within Wyoming that are a long distance from the train line YET are subjected to the associated noises as much or worse than are many places a great deal closer. While by the same token quite a few buildings situated within a stone's throw of the tracks are so solidly constructed that while inside you have no idea a freight train is rolling past save for perhaps some slight vibration. Family acquaintances have marveled at this phenomenon at work when they've visited the home of a friend of theirs in nearby Hartwell. That area bears the dubious distinction of being crisscrossed by TWO heavily-used N-S lines. The racket at grade crossings can cause urban-living adults to clap hands over ears, and houses in close proximity to visibly shake. YET, report these people, all you have to do is run inside to evade the cacophony. Who knows how thickly and of what material the walls of their friend's house were built from when the house went up in the 1920's. But the place from the foundation up doesn't have so much as a hairline crack and "I swear you don't hear a thing."

For the first three years of their marriage the "Goyguy Sr's" rented a second-floor apartment in a "brick box" building on Durrell Ave in Wyoming, which happens to be south of Wyoming Ave and therefore could well be where the OP is contemplating moving. One night while the trains kept a-rollin' I was conceived. LOL In the ensuing years there have never been reminiscences of how awful the noise was from the tracks all of two blocks away. The one story oft retold is that of a bat's getting into the place and terrorizing the pregnant woman while the anxious father-to-be swatted at the winged mammal with a broom. Nothing about rattling dishes or non-stop locomotive horns, though. Like all first-time expectant parents what stayed with them over the years was their irrational fear of "losing the baby."

Like the sound of ambulances along major thoroughfares or near hospitals, hair-trigger car alarms anyplace many people park on the street, etc, the noise from trains soon becomes "sonic wallpaper" to people who reside in the vicinity. Sleep is sooner lost in the absence of it because a familiar presence has been removed, than when it's freight-hauling business as usual. And today "sound canceling" or "white noise" machines are available right along with ear plugs. Therefore "too close to railroad tracks" is a pretty weak excuse for not moving in somewhere.
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Old 03-19-2015, 12:32 AM
 
10,135 posts, read 24,439,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Wyoming is built in the middle of the busiest industrial corridor in 200 miles in any direction. Trains, trucks, cars, air pollution, sewerage, you name it. Like having a home in the parking lot of a factory. How the houses got there in the first place it a mystery to me. Perhaps is was executive housing for the captains of that industry. Close to their mills and factories. Everything else around it is worker housing, built to house the laborers of industry.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlkmnsgrl View Post
This is really interesting! Is this a n-s line, e-w, or an intersection of many? How far out of Wyoming, going eastish, would you need to be to lessen the noise and pollution? Is Reading far enough? Sharonville?
Its a north-south freight route. Reading is partly the hillside into the valley on the east side as Wyoming as the same on the west side of the valley. Both have a nice view of the factories and highways. Your best distance from Wyoming is Blue Ash.


To me, the problem is not just the discernible train noise in Wyoming. Speed limits and train horn use restrictions in the Millcreek corridor have probably made that less of an issue than it once was. But the dull roar of one of the oldest and busiest X-ways in the U.S. combined with the trains and the constant humm of industry make Wyoming the epicenter of noise pollution in Cincinnati. Some of I-75 is even elevated around there. In Wyoming one is never more than a mile away from I-75 which has to be mind numbing for the locals. Like pig farmers get used to the stench, they in Wyoming are likely oblivious to the constant background noise. And the smells are likely a similar issue. As good a job as the Ohio EPA has done with industrial air emissions, pollution settles into the valley.

Most everything dirty or stinky or noisy is located in the valley. It is why people seeking an advantageous location settle on hilltops and meadows most places.

Last edited by Wilson513; 03-19-2015 at 01:28 AM..
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Old 03-19-2015, 06:19 AM
 
1,130 posts, read 2,202,108 times
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While I can't say this from personal experience, people who live next to these things tend not to notice them over time. My grandfather grew up on Parkway Avenue in Hartwell, which was bisected by this line. In his day, these were chuffing, noisy steam locomotives belching black smoke. They never thought much of it.

My second anecdote: A high school friend's family lived on Greenville Avenue in Glendale, which faces right out on this line and runs exactly parallel. One night I was at a party at her house and we, the guests, began noticing that trains were going by the house at the rate of about one every 20 minutes! We asked, "how do you stand that?" "Stand what?" was the response. So, there you go.
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Old 03-20-2015, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,233,416 times
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I would rather hear the trains than ambulance sirens. The trains are somewhat relaxing and are like white noise while the sirens are shrill and disturbing and I could actually pick up on the negative energy as they go by. The sad thing about it is that the ambulances like to use my street as a shortcut for some reason and no I am not on a main thoroughfare nor do live close by to the fire station . Unfortunately they are a needed and necessary evil.
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