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Old 08-15-2010, 06:58 PM
 
4,709 posts, read 5,589,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdw1084 View Post
You need to learn how to comprehend. Go back and read my post again.
And need to learn to not take stuff so seriously, I read you post, I just ask you a question all you had to do is responed if wanted too.
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:10 PM
 
4,709 posts, read 5,589,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
That's probably not what most people would think of when you said that; that's why I wanted clarification. But I don't think any of that has anything to do with Atlanta in particular; any moderately growing city in the Southern Piedmont is going to have all that.
Agreed which is what I'm trying to pointed out to west bank

Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
First, No Piedmont city is known for having good infrastructure. Most developing cities use Atlanta as a guide to what not to do in terms of infrastructure. Secondly, you said "Birmingham infrastructure does make it feel faster than those two cities". I replied "IMO, Birmingham's infrastructure makes it feel more spread out than it does.
I know you were going to do this rant, remember we are comparing 2 piedmont cities.

Again another straw man, you taking how Birmingham is spread out and now "Most developing cities use Atlanta as a guide to what not to do in terms of infrastructure." and 'No Piedmont city is known for having good infrastructure" and blah blah when Charlotte is a piedmont city also, so whats the relevance of your comment in comparson? By your sense Charlotte too should feel not as fast little Rock what are we getting at.
1. home lot varies there no all big lots.
2. Birmingham is an older city it been a major city for a while. So it’s infrastructure core has a older city density. Little and Jackson no.
3.
Piedmont Metros become less denser the farther out the lots become larger, the other sunbelt Metros your taking about keep the same home lot sizes but the developments become more and more isolate all together themselves that don’t make them feel more urban. Again this why the overall density of ATL Hou and Dal are close, no matter how much yall keep taking about home sizes. I know this for a fact that Dallas suburban development subdivision leap frog more than Atlanta‘s, this is why the overall density of Dallas, Houston and Atlanta metros are very close. I seen this, you can have a subdivision just cut out in the middle of no where but yes home lots are denser, like that matter Dallas - Google Maps. Do you have Google earth you should check this out. little rock is denser than Birmingham you know you need to quit. Jefferson County, Alabama 595/sq mi, is Pulaski County, Arkansas 494/sq mi. Birmingham suburbia is are also denser thus the overall Metro is denser than Jackson and little Rock. Birmingham is more spread by default by it being larger, which also makes it feel bigger than those two you can go way further out and still have a least suburbanization.
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:19 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 10,066,581 times
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chiatldal, why so you have such a hard time comprehending anything? Do you do that on purpose?
But for the record, the Urban areas of Little Rock and Jackson are just a little bit more denser than Birmingham. You can check the census or Wikipedia.
Out...
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
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I can't chime in on Jackson and Little Rock because i've never been to those places. But I will say I put Birmingham more in the same category with Columbia, SC and Greensboro, NC than Charlotte. I just don't see Birmingham and Charlotte on the same levels at all.
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,630 posts, read 4,170,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
And need to learn to not take stuff so seriously, I read you post, I just ask you a question all you had to do is responed if wanted too.
I didn't take it seriously but it was clear you misunderstood what I was saying...
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:59 PM
 
256 posts, read 578,740 times
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I can't speak for Jackson, but...Charlotte offers far more than all the cities mentioned. HOWEVER, Birmingham is one of the most NATURALLY beautiful metros in the country. Extreme natural beauty with its hilly/mountainous terrain. Birmingham's inner-ring suburbs are the most attractively master-planned communities I've ever seen. The housing stock has a timeless 1920s appeal in many areas. The inner-ring areas are old-money, refined, "handsome", refined Old South. When I think of enclave communities, I think of Birmingham. If you love THE SOUTH, Birmingham is hard to beat aesthetically. Very hard to beat. (Now, downtown B'ham is, TO ME, one of the ugliest -- very industrial and gray and run down).

I've got no beef with any with ANY city. They ALL offer pockets of just about everything. It just depends on your personality.

I'm not a B'ham salesman. Personally, I am Team Nashville as far as the South goes. But, I wish Nashville had the uber-enclaves and original master planning and timelessness that so many areas B'ham offers. As well as the extreme hills/small mountains.

When I think of steeped, I think Birmingham. When I think enclaves, I think Birmingham. When I think natural beauty, I think Birmingham.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,630 posts, read 4,170,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepless in Bham View Post
Just like you comparing Jackson to Bham makes Jackson look bad.

Jackson and Birmingham are much closer than Birmingham and Atlanta. If anything Charlotte would be a smaller Atlanta.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:04 PM
 
2,399 posts, read 4,029,292 times
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Technically, Birmingham is not a Piedmont City. It is a Ridge & Valley City. Hence, Red Mountain is a Ridge, as is the mountain down highway 280 that you cross.

Anniston is about the northern extent of the Piedmont in Alabama, and it is far east of Birmingham. Montgomery, on the other hand, is on the edge of the Piedmont and coastal plain.

Atlanta is on the Piedmont.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:05 PM
 
2,399 posts, read 4,029,292 times
Reputation: 1299
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidH74 View Post
I can't speak for Jackson, but...Charlotte offers far more than all the cities mentioned. HOWEVER, Birmingham is one of the most NATURALLY beautiful metros in the country. Extreme natural beauty with its hilly/mountainous terrain. Birmingham's inner-ring suburbs are the most attractively master-planned communities I've ever seen. The housing stock has a timeless 1920s appeal in many areas. The inner-ring areas are old-money, refined, "handsome", refined Old South. When I think of enclave communities, I think of Birmingham. If you love THE SOUTH, Birmingham is hard to beat aesthetically. Very hard to beat. (Now, downtown B'ham is, TO ME, one of the ugliest -- very industrial and gray and run down).

I've got no beef with any with ANY city. They ALL offer pockets of just about everything. It just depends on your personality.

I'm not a B'ham salesman. Personally, I am Team Nashville as far as the South goes. But, I wish Nashville had the uber-enclaves and original master planning and timelessness that so many areas B'ham offers. As well as the extreme hills/small mountains.

When I think of steeped, I think Birmingham. When I think enclaves, I think Birmingham. When I think natural beauty, I think Birmingham.
Vestavia Hills, Mountain Brook, and Homewood can't be beat.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:11 PM
 
256 posts, read 578,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
Vestavia Hills, Mountain Brook, and Homewood can't be beat.

I agree. I know all cities have nice areas. Most cities have areas of extreme, established wealth. But, those above-mentioned areas aren't just hard to beat -- they CAN'T be beat.
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