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Old 06-05-2020, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
7,406 posts, read 3,044,581 times
Reputation: 4641

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Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
I think the South has great universities, NC/FL/GA are all top of the line for public universities compared to MA/NJ/DE/RI/NH... but a huge anomaly to the North is NYS. NYS has the SUNY/CUNY system which is amazing. Its relatively inexpensive, provides quality education and leads you to huge job markets. I went to a SUNY, and literally everyone I know is working in Boston, New York City, DC, or in Upstate Cities for great companies. The North's public higher education system is not as good as the South's, but NYS has a fairly decent, almost as great, public higher education system.
I feel like people in NY don’t want to go to SUBYs though at the very least the national profile is muted for a state of its size. The decentralized nature probably does that. That being said ik nothing about the quality of education. Nice to hear-I assumed it was weak.
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Old 06-05-2020, 08:24 AM
 
3,583 posts, read 3,411,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Southerners are sensitive. Why would I bother with the fake pleasantries. Obviously the k-12 schoolS in the NE are better. Why do you take that as an affront or personal? I wouldn’t take it personal if you said the COL was better and residential integration and business environment was better in the south. Because those things are true. Why are you even allowing yourself to get upset. Are you a K-13 teacher? I ceded you all have better public universities. Relax.
Well, these are gross generalizations as it depends on where and what school in any region of the US (K-12). I once taught high school for a while in NC at an "inner" school, actually computer network and engineering courses. We had some students who moved from the parts of the NE and matriculated into class. In my experiences those students were not more advanced and leaned on current students in the class. Extremely anecdotal but nonetheless an observation.

If the NE metro educational system is more advanced than SE metros, it is marginal at best, not this huge difference made out to be.

And education is three parts (1) aptitude (2) resources and (2) parental involvement. Most schools use similar teaching material however technology resources may vary. At the end of the day, good students/parents make a helluva difference not matter the environment. Point is, the school system isn't going to be the deciding factor with respective to getting a solid education whether in the SE or NE. In today's world, technology allows for information to be available and accessible just about from anywhere. Location is moot.
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Old 06-05-2020, 08:27 AM
 
63,215 posts, read 88,740,266 times
Reputation: 13811
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
I think the South has great universities, NC/FL/GA are all top of the line for public universities compared to MA/NJ/DE/RI/NH... but a huge anomaly to the North is NYS. NYS has the SUNY/CUNY system which is amazing. Its relatively inexpensive, provides quality education and leads you to huge job markets. I went to a SUNY, and literally everyone I know is working in Boston, New York City, DC, or in Upstate Cities for great companies. The North's public higher education system is not as good as the South's, but NYS has a fairly decent, almost as great, public higher education system.
I second this, as the SUNY university centers(University at Buffalo, Binghamton, Albany and Stony Brook) all have some highly regarded programs. Binghamton is actually a sleeper, as it has pretty good STEM based programs. People may not realize this, but some of Cornell University’s programs are actually under the SUNY system.

Then, even the colleges have good programs like Oswego has an underrated Communications program, Geneseo has good STEM programs, Potsdam has an underrated Music school(Crane), etc.

With CUNY, you have the Law program at John Jay, Hunter College has a good Pre Med program, Baruch has a good Business program, etc.

Both are very diverse systems in multiple ways as well.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
7,595 posts, read 3,641,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kswisscarl View Post
Just so you know, Vanderbilt is in Nashville.
I know. But note that save for Rice, I listed every other university, public and private, by its state.

As for the others:

Duke: Durham
UNC: Chapel Hill plus satellite campuses, largest in Charlotte
UVa: Charlottesville
UGa: Athens
UTexas: Flagship campus Austin, satellite campuses in most other large Texas cities
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
7,595 posts, read 3,641,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whereiend View Post
Whether is means anything is debatable, but the University of Texas is and always has been considered a "public ivy", since the term was coined.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Ivy
I stand corrected. Thanks.

And I see I left out Virginia's other public Ivy, the College of William and Mary (Williamsburg), the second-oldest college in the United States after the one I graduated from in Cambridge, Mass.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:06 AM
 
14,789 posts, read 23,696,386 times
Reputation: 5396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Aristotle View Post
Well, these are gross generalizations as it depends on where and what school in any region of the US (K-12). I once taught high school for a while in NC at an "inner" school, actually computer network and engineering courses. We had some students who moved from the parts of the NE and matriculated into class. In my experiences those students were not more advanced and leaned on current students in the class. Extremely anecdotal but nonetheless an observation.

If the NE metro educational system is more advanced than SE metros, it is marginal at best, not this huge difference made out to be.

And education is three parts (1) aptitude (2) resources and (2) parental involvement. Most schools use similar teaching material however technology resources may vary. At the end of the day, good students/parents make a helluva difference not matter the environment. Point is, the school system isn't going to be the deciding factor with respective to getting a solid education whether in the SE or NE. In today's world, technology allows for information to be available and accessible just about from anywhere. Location is moot
.

The smartest, most accurate post of the thread.


The thread can be closed now.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:09 AM
 
1,643 posts, read 988,908 times
Reputation: 1275
If we're talking elementary and high schools. The suburbs in the Northeast do fine. The cities are cash strapped and schools are under funded.

For higher ed the Northeast ignored it's public's for a long time because of the excellent privates. Now UConn, UMass, Buffalo, Stony Brook , etc are funded better and moving up in the rankings.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
7,595 posts, read 3,641,974 times
Reputation: 4831
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
I think the South has great universities, NC/FL/GA are all top of the line for public universities compared to MA/NJ/DE/RI/NH... but a huge anomaly to the North is NYS. NYS has the SUNY/CUNY system which is amazing. Its relatively inexpensive, provides quality education and leads you to huge job markets. I went to a SUNY, and literally everyone I know is working in Boston, New York City, DC, or in Upstate Cities for great companies. The North's public higher education system is not as good as the South's, but NYS has a fairly decent, almost as great, public higher education system.
Actually, according to that Wikipedia list of public Ivies, two public universities in Pennsylvania, the flagship Penn State campus and the University of Pittsburgh, are in the second "honorable mention" tier, and in the book on the subject that came out, those two are included along with the universities of Delaware and Maryland.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Aristotle View Post
And education is three parts (1) aptitude (2) resources and (2) parental involvement. Most schools use similar teaching material however technology resources may vary. At the end of the day, good students/parents make a helluva difference not matter the environment. Point is, the school system isn't going to be the deciding factor with respective to getting a solid education whether in the SE or NE. In today's world, technology allows for information to be available and accessible just about from anywhere. Location is moot.
The part I bold-faced is at the core of my argument that good kids from families who support them can shine in "bad" schools. The one exception to this assertion is if the school has a high percentage of disruptive students in it.

I also use this argument to make the case for white parents to consider schools where their children will be in the minority.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I second this, as the SUNY university centers(University at Buffalo, Binghamton, Albany and Stony Brook) all have some highly regarded programs. Binghamton is actually a sleeper, as it has pretty good STEM based programs. People may not realize this, but some of Cornell University’s programs are actually under the SUNY system.
In particular, the agricultural and environmental-sciences schools — the schools that make Cornell the only land grant university in the Ivy League. I think they also make Cornell the only land grant university in New York State.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:18 AM
 
479 posts, read 307,656 times
Reputation: 675
I don't see a big difference in NE schools or SE schools. If there is any difference, it's marginal..

We can always cherry pick and compare the worst school system in SE to the best school system in NE or vice versa but there are good pockets and bad pockets in both the areas and it depends on which school system you pick..

The SE has marginally better public universities compared to NE..
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
4,724 posts, read 3,300,489 times
Reputation: 6858
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I know. But note that save for Rice, I listed every other university, public and private, by its state.

As for the others:

Duke: Durham
UNC: Chapel Hill plus satellite campuses, largest in Charlotte
UVa: Charlottesville
UGa: Athens
UTexas: Flagship campus Austin, satellite campuses in most other large Texas cities
Not quite...

UNC Chapel Hill is the "Flagship" and original UNC. It's the only one that really goes by "UNC" without saying the city and is the only one considered a "public ivy".

The other UNC-system schools (I.E. all of the public universities in the state of NC) are not, however,"satellite" campuses; they are their own universities with their own charters, chancellors, admissions, graduate/post-doc programs, athletic programs etc... they are just all part of the same larger NC public university system.

Many of them don't even contain "UNC" in their names; East Carolina University, App State, NC State, Western Carolina; all UNC-system schools. UNC Charlotte is also not the largest; that would be NC State in Raleigh.

I see you live in PA which believe has Penn State in State College, PA as the main 4-year campus with many satellite campuses all over the state that are generally two-year schools where students then often transfer-in to College Station campus after the first two years...this is not the same dynamic with public universities in NC.

Last edited by TarHeelNick; 06-05-2020 at 09:48 AM..
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