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Old 04-08-2011, 12:48 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Throughout the United States, there are groups of two or more states that have always seemed to have common bonds. But as time goes by, some states develop stronger bonds with each other, while other states develop weaker bonds. Which states do you think have developed stronger bonds with each other in recent years? Which states have developed weaker bonds? Here's how I see it:

Common bonds strengthening

- Connecticut and New York
- Georgia and South Carolina
- Idaho and Utah
- Illinois and Indiana
- Maryland and Virginia
- Massachusetts and New Hampshire
- New York and Pennsylvania
- Oklahoma and Texas

Common bonds weakening

- Alabama and Georgia
- Arkansas and Oklahoma
- Connecticut and Massachusetts
- Kansas and Nebraska
- Michigan and Wisconsin
- New Hampshire and Vermont
- North Carolina and Virginia
- Ohio and Pennsylvania

Feel free to add your own list, and also feel free to either affirm or refute any pairings on my list.
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Old 04-08-2011, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
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The strengthening or weakening of the NC/VA bond could be debated either way.

I've lived at opposite ends of NC, and the NC Triangle (and Triad, and Fayetteville, to lesser degrees) feel like they are slowly being pulled into the Mid Atlantic - due to the migrant influx, the university demographics, the major military presence in some E NC cities (and the close connection between those cities and Washington), and the very extensive NoVA/RDU connections in tech, r&d, government, academia. The Triangle is internationalizing, in its' demographics, very, very quickly. This feels like at least parts of NC, parts of VA are being slowly but steadily swept into the greater Washington sphere of influence.

In rural eastern NC, if people don't go to Raleigh to shop, they go to Richmond or the Hampton Roads area, and the suburbs of Hampton Roads are spilling over into the far NE corner of NC.

This is NOT true once you get down to Charlotte or Asheville, where close connections with SC and north Georgia are a lot more palpable. The business and finance circles in Charlotte and Atlanta are pretty intimately connected at this point, and the far SW corner of NC (Cherokee and Clay Counties) seem to be picking up some spillover growth from N GA and SE TN.

In that, NC seems to feel like parts of it belong neatly with several other regions, while putting the entire state into any of them is a bit less accurate.

And for what that might be worth, places like Hickory and Lenoir definitely feel like (and look like, to some degree) rust-belt-gone-South. Parts of rural eastern NC - east of I-95 - you might as well be in Mississippi. It's definitely a state with a complex identity, going through a lot of seemingly paradoxical changes.
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Old 04-08-2011, 03:48 PM
 
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California and Nevada is strengthening. Once the high speed rail between Socal and Vegas is complete, Vegas might as well be an LA suburb.
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Old 04-08-2011, 04:01 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
10,745 posts, read 23,801,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Throughout the United States, there are groups of two or more states that have always seemed to have common bonds. But as time goes by, some states develop stronger bonds with each other, while other states develop weaker bonds. Which states do you think have developed stronger bonds with each other in recent years? Which states have developed weaker bonds? Here's how I see it:

Common bonds strengthening

- Connecticut and New York
- Georgia and South Carolina
- Idaho and Utah
- Illinois and Indiana
- Maryland and Virginia
- Massachusetts and New Hampshire
- New York and Pennsylvania
- Oklahoma and Texas

Common bonds weakening

- Alabama and Georgia
- Arkansas and Oklahoma
- Connecticut and Massachusetts
- Kansas and Nebraska
- Michigan and Wisconsin
- New Hampshire and Vermont
- North Carolina and Virginia
- Ohio and Pennsylvania

Feel free to add your own list, and also feel free to either affirm or refute any pairings on my list.
Common bonds strengthening

- Massachusetts and New Hampshire
It's been this way for a while. NH is really the only Northeastern state that has remarkable growth rates. With NH having no sales or income tax, it's plain to see why so many are migrating from Mass to NH. The migration is also going up I-95 into Southern Maine. From Portland and Concord south the area is often coined Northern Mass. Natives will tell you the "real" NH begins north of Concord, and likewise the "real" Maine begings north of Portland.

- Connecticut and New York
Yeah I'd say so.

Common bonds weakening

- New Hampshire and Vermont
Perhaps. I suppose back in the day they had more in common agriculturally. NH has always been the icon of yankee conservartism (fiscally) and more pro business and tax friendly. Vermont was a bit more conservative like NH a generation ago but in recent years it's become a lot more liberal. Migrants from Mass go to NH to seek a more fiscally conservative and business/tax friendly environment (IE Fidelity jobs moving from MA to NH), where many trasnplants from NY/NJ and all over move to Vermont as they seem to view VT as a rural liberal refuge. So the political ideology is different between the two states but NH & VT are otherwise pretty well connected (many Vermonters shop in NH) and always will be. There's never really been any sort of unfriendly rivalry, they're just different.

- Connecticut and Massachusetts
I can't remember these two states ever really bonding or being chummy to any sort of degree. Only big connection I'd say is people in Western Mass & Springfield using Hartford's airport and other metro ammentities. Otherwise Mass. hold's it's own and Connecticut looks more towards NY.

Last edited by Champ le monstre du lac; 04-08-2011 at 04:19 PM..
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
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I think the completion of HSR between Charlotte and DC will only deepen the NC/VA.DC/MD connection.

The would between Charlotte and Raleigh has been underway for the majority of the last decade, with major upgrades in place. The ROW between Raleigh and Richmond has been secured as well, along an abandoned freight line ROW, so there will be no compering with freights in that leg of the track (south of Raleigh, track is being gradually doubled). North of Richmond some work has been done as well. This would be essentially a southern extension of the Washington-to-Boston HSR line.

On the already completed stretch in NC, ridership has been above projections, and the state has done a great deal of promotion to build awareness.

The initial plan, in the late 1990s was for the southern terminus to be Atlanta, but governors in GA and SC at the time flatly rejected the idea, so the southern endpoint was truncated to Charlotte. As small (compared to other east coast CSAs) and stereotypically sprawly as Charlotte is, if Charlotte is still big enough to generate sufficient traffic for an HSR line, it would have been great to run this down to Atlanta.

In the meantime, I think this will certainly integrate NC's economy into the mid-Atlantic, and this will slowly (very slowly, but steadily) accelerate.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NYC
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Hmm... There's a pretty strong bond between New York and New Jersey, but I'm not sure whether I'd categorize it as strengthening or weakening...
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,108 posts, read 10,798,538 times
Reputation: 3444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Throughout the United States, there are groups of two or more states that have always seemed to have common bonds. But as time goes by, some states develop stronger bonds with each other, while other states develop weaker bonds. Which states do you think have developed stronger bonds with each other in recent years? Which states have developed weaker bonds? Here's how I see it:

Common bonds strengthening

- Connecticut and New York
- Georgia and South Carolina
- Idaho and Utah
- Illinois and Indiana
- Maryland and Virginia
- Massachusetts and New Hampshire
- New York and Pennsylvania
- Oklahoma and Texas

Common bonds weakening

- Alabama and Georgia
- Arkansas and Oklahoma
- Connecticut and Massachusetts
- Kansas and Nebraska
- Michigan and Wisconsin
- New Hampshire and Vermont
- North Carolina and Virginia
- Ohio and Pennsylvania

Feel free to add your own list, and also feel free to either affirm or refute any pairings on my list.
Very good list, nothing I would really change.

I would also add the following:

Strengthening:
California and Nevada
Oregon and Washington
North Carolina and South Carolina (although the strong bond has always been in effect)
Maryland and Delaware
West Virginia and Virginia
West Virginia and Pennsylvania

Weakening:
Florida and Georgia
Louisiana and Texas
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:36 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,966 posts, read 24,148,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EclecticEars View Post
Very good list, nothing I would really change.

I would also add the following:

Strengthening:
California and Nevada
Oregon and Washington
North Carolina and South Carolina (although the strong bond has always been in effect)Maryland and Delaware
West Virginia and Virginia
West Virginia and Pennsylvania

Weakening:
Florida and Georgia
Louisiana and Texas
As davidals states, it's true for a part of NC. In the Triangle, and probably the Triad as well, the connection to SC is weak. IMO, the connection to SC is growing even weaker in the Triangle.
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Old 04-09-2011, 10:26 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,180 posts, read 14,859,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
As davidals states, it's true for a part of NC. In the Triangle, and probably the Triad as well, the connection to SC is weak. IMO, the connection to SC is growing even weaker in the Triangle.
I don't know if there ever was a connection to SC in the Triangle. However, you do see the bond strengthening in the Charlotte region (which where the bond has always been strongest, IMO), Upstate SC (close connections with Asheville and western NC), and the fast-growing areas of Wilmington and Myrtle Beach--which have the potential to form a singular metro area in the future if growth patterns persist.
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Old 04-09-2011, 10:36 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
9,169 posts, read 13,238,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Galactic View Post
Hmm... There's a pretty strong bond between New York and New Jersey, but I'm not sure whether I'd categorize it as strengthening or weakening...
There has been a strong bond since the Dutch period when they were part of the same colony. Even during the English period, New York and New Jersey shared governors. The two states were ground zero for most of the American Revolution and New Jersey also lost alot of good people on Sept 11.

Its hard to say how the relationship has changed in the last 5 years or so. What I can say is there is already a huge amount of cooperation. For instance, many people in New Jersey get their water from New York, New Jersey Transit helps provide service for Metro-North on the west side of the Hudson, and there is of course the Port Authority.

Its interesting that both states now have governors who trying to control the growth of runaway taxes that plague both states.
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