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Old 03-24-2012, 11:48 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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It's probably not overblown if you're not just looking at the official decade span of the census. Ten years is a significant amount of time and what many rust belt cities might be hiding in that decade long statistic is the inflection point where population loss plateaued or became population gain (perhaps even as recently as from 2009 to 2010). There's a good amount of investment that's gone into rust belt cities and the fruits of those investments aren't immediately apparent since they are investments for the future.
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Old 03-25-2012, 01:07 AM
 
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Many cities in the "Rustbelt" have a serious image problem that they are trying to change. It may be overblown, but when you live in a city like Cleveland that has been known as the "Mistake on the Lake" it is important for people to understand that progress has been made. People still think the Cuyahoga is burning and are unaware that the economy is not nearly as dependent on manufacturing as it once was.
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Old 03-25-2012, 03:15 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
14,186 posts, read 22,736,528 times
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Since the 1990's, "Rust Belt" boosters have had to yell simply to be heard, because nobody would pay any attention otherwise. They'd just listen to the stories of the people who moved away from the Rust Belt to their cities during the 1970's and 1980's, and then assume that nothing has changed. In terms of statistics and demographics, they'd dwell on the lagging indicators while paying no mind whatsoever to the leading indicators. Rust Belt cities are mesofacts in motion.

Last edited by Craziaskowboi; 03-25-2012 at 03:29 AM..
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Old 03-25-2012, 11:32 AM
 
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The rust belt is just so depressing for the rest of the country. Seeing abandoned factories covered in graffiti, people walking hunched over down on their luck is depressing. Until some of the cities can get rid of all the reminds people of the decline a revival is unlikely. Its sad when you live in these places you don't realize how bad it is until you go live somewhere else. some like pittsburgh and cleveland seem able to reinvent themselves but I don't know about Detroit and Buffalo. Buffalo sits on a Great Lake 25 minutes from a natural wonder yet remains as one of the most rundown cities. Half of the homes/factories are just abandoned rat holes. It's like they are still waiting for someone to buy the old plants and reopen them rather than tear everything down, plant some trees and accept a smaller, but simpler existence.
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Some people like shiny sterile and new, some people don't. Personally I would take the aesthetic of the rust belt over a boomtown suburb any day. A place should look like it has lived. In Europe they celebrate their ruins.
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:59 PM
 
Location: California
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Jobs are important for the vital to any area, so if you have to follow your job, then do what you must to survive. Last time I was in Phoenix, there were some wonderful places in the Scottsdale area but just a few miles down the road, some drug-filled and very depressed areas also. Now that we are getting closer to retirement I am anxious to return to the rust belt where there are so many good hearted people which make it home, rust and all. Oh, and when I do get home I intend to participate in my community to make it the best place in the world.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:04 PM
 
16,345 posts, read 18,055,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I think people overexaggerate how their city or a shrinking city is coming back.
For example People love to say Cleveland is roaring back, and quickly regaining its footing, and overall just bursting at the seams, but if that where true, would it have lost 17.1% of its population? and would its metro be Shrinking?
not to say these cities are not improving I just think people are jumping the gun a bit.
and its not just Cleveland, its other cities too, llike Pittsburgh, and other "rustbelt" cities.
Yes and no. I do think that the traditional Rust Belt, like Cleveland, IS recovering, but I do think how fast that's occurring is somewhat overblown, especially by local residents. I also think some former Rust Belt cities are doing better than others. The entire Great Lakes/Midwest, however, is seeing a resurgence and gaining back a lot of what it lost.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPP1999 View Post
I agree with this. I do think that the Cleveland boosters are getting a little crazy on these boards. Calling that city "Chicago-ish" seems a little like hyperbole to me. I think it's great that cities have boosters but come on. To read some of their posts you'd think that in 5 years Cleveland's skyline will trump Midtown Manhattan's.
Agreed. Cleveland is seeing it's downtown coming back with lots of new projects, and I think it has more real momentum in this new "resurgence" than in past attempts, but a lot of people there are getting way ahead of themselves. They need to worry more about sustaining this direction than in just cheerleading the present.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by maxposure View Post
So true. It's not like kids graduating from high school or college are dreaming of moving to Cleveland, Buffalo or Pgh (all fine cities, btw) instead of NYC or LA.
Not exactly a fair comparison. There are plenty of cities in the Midwest and Great Lakes that are seeing growth. A city doesn't have to be NYC or LA to have it.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Overblown by whom? It seems that outside of this forum, you know, in the real world, most people casually and recklessly dismiss the Rust Belt as an undesirable has-been. It's only the geography geeks who are looking closer and saying "hey wait a minute, there's more to the story".

Mainstream consciousness is starting to shift, though. I'm seeing a major increase in interest in the Midwest among my ordinary non-geek friends. The Sunbelt just doesn't inspire people the same way after the housing crash has taken some of the glossy sheen off of those areas.
The Sun Belt may be the most overrated region in the country, and has been for decades. Soulless sprawl, crappy infrastructure and a culture that, whether or not people admit it, is still decades behind other areas... my visits there have been underwhelming for all the hype, to say the least.
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