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Old 03-25-2012, 02:32 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,966 posts, read 24,150,335 times
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While some Rustbelt metros are growing modestly, others are essentially treading water while some of the major Rustbelt metros continue to lose population. According to estimates, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Cleveland continue to lose population. The Detroit metro is estimated to be down by almost 44,000 since 2010 while Pittsburgh is down almost 6,000 and Cleveland is down over 12,000. These are not healthy numbers and they don't match some of the assertions being made here on C-D regularly.
If there isn't even modest growth in large metros it's telling me 2 things: 1.) the population is aging & 2.) younger adults are leaving.
Now, it's still possible to have re-birth and investment in these cities' cores but it doesn't mean that these metros/cities are growing in population. In the end, I do think that the core cities have a brighter future than much of their suburbs.

source: http://www.bizjournals.com/bizjourna...rrentPageSize=
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Old 03-25-2012, 07:33 PM
 
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Like some have said, it depends on the area. For instance, the metro I live in gained 12,000 people between the 2000-2010 census. It is actually at its highest metro population ever for the 3 county metro. Downtown living units are at 99% occupancy, with more on the way. There has been quite of construction in conjunction with our colleges, hospitals and in Downtown. Our urban school district, while struggling with many issues that such school districts around this country deal, has a great program that allows children that graduate(as long as they go to one of the HS's for at least 3 years) can go to college for free: Say Yes to Education - Syracuse

There are other things and you still have issues and negativity to deal with, but why not be encouraged by some of the things going on?
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Old 03-25-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
14,186 posts, read 22,732,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
The Detroit metro is estimated to be down by almost 44,000 since 2010 while Pittsburgh is down almost 6,000 and Cleveland is down over 12,000. These are not healthy numbers and they don't match some of the assertions being made here on C-D regularly.
If there isn't even modest growth in large metros it's telling me 2 things: 1.) the population is aging & 2.) younger adults are leaving.
I can't speak for Detroit or Cleveland, but the population loss in Pittsburgh is driven by children (under 18) and the elderly (over 65). The working-age population (18 to 65) is flat.
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Old 03-25-2012, 11:16 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I can't speak for Detroit or Cleveland, but the population loss in Pittsburgh is driven by children (under 18) and the elderly (over 65). The working-age population (18 to 65) is flat.
18-65 is a wide range of ages. What are the components of that "flat" population? If under 18 is shrinking, it would suggest to me that more families with kids are leaving than those who are staying put and having kids. Eventually a shrinking "under 18" population is going to cause a decline in the working age populace unless the city can find a way to attract college grads, etc. On a side note, I also suppose that a good number of the elderly are following their children and grandchildren to their next destination?

At the end of the day, it's not a healthy mix for growth in the future. Rustbelt cities must find ways to attract and retain the younger generations.

I really like Pittsburgh. I have been several time and I'd really to see it succeed! I feel the same way about Cleveland. I really can't speak for Detroit because I have really only been to Oakland County in its burbs.
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Old 03-26-2012, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
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What is happening in Cleveland is NOT being overblown at all ... The facts tell the story. This city is staging its latest renaissance, and it's the biggest ever witnessed in this important city. People are NOT overstating the tremendous momentum, positive energy and the drastically changing appearance of Cleveland ... In five more years, it will be even more startling to witness even more success for this city and region.

Cleveland has shed a sizable portion of its city proper population, but there are definitive signs of this exodus beginning to diminish as we can now proudly boast of having one of the best job markets in the country. Our enviable unemployment level is much lower than in popular cities such as Atlanta, Charlotte, and even Chicago! Its absolutely factual.

Cleveland's success is a story for the ages ...

http://voices.yahoo.com/the-return-comeback-city-11048888.html?cat=7



Wide Range of Construction Projects Being Built in Cleveland




Greater Cleveland Partnership 2011 Annual Meeting Video - YouTube




Downtown Cleveland... Is It For You? - YouTube
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Old 03-26-2012, 11:37 PM
 
2,491 posts, read 4,467,349 times
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Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
The Sun Belt may be the most overrated region in the country, and has been for decades. Soulless sprawl, crappy infrastructure and a culture that, whether or not people admit it, is still decades behind other areas... my visits there have been underwhelming for all the hype, to say the least.
Here, here!

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Old 03-27-2012, 07:26 AM
 
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No one outside of Cleveland says Cleveland is back (or was ever relevant in the first place).

Minneapolis seems to be becoming more popular than I remember it, as is Denver.
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Old 03-27-2012, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
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I believe the very modest gains reflect the recent modest gains in US manufacturing...Americans really want the regions to build back to at least some semblance of their former glory to make the country proud.
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Old 03-27-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,530 posts, read 5,020,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slevin Kelevra View Post
No one outside of Cleveland says Cleveland is back (or was ever relevant in the first place).

Minneapolis seems to be becoming more popular than I remember it, as is Denver.
(1) Cleveland boosters are some of the best cheerleaders in the business;

(2) Neither Minneapolis nor Denver were ever considered "rust belt cities."
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Old 03-27-2012, 09:05 AM
 
27,182 posts, read 43,876,617 times
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In my opinion it's not about Rustbelt vs. Sunbelt, rather cities that have figured out how to attract a diversified infrastructure and a skilled, educated workforce. Cities lacking in higher wage jobs and an educated population aren't going to be seeing quality, sustained growth.

The Most and Least Educated Cities | Men's Health
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