U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-08-2012, 01:41 PM
 
6,610 posts, read 7,458,727 times
Reputation: 4141

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarvinStrong313 View Post
Lol Atlanta is a very urban city??? Detroit has suburbs denser than Atlanta it's self. Most of Atlanta or it's suburbs aren't very urban. Hell, you can Google map most random neighborhoods and street view it to see how "urban" much of Atlanta is.
Most of Atlanta's suburbs aren't very urban? Newflash!

I wouldn't hold up Detroit as an example of urbanity over Atlanta when they are on much the same level...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-08-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,421 posts, read 2,776,230 times
Reputation: 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
This sounds made up! No city in the world could be THAT great!!

All he said was that skyscrapers ("Amazon alone has three new supertalls"), lacking arts/music scene ("WaMu , SoDo, Paramount, tripple door, Moore, ShowBox, live music theaters must not know about it.", and all probably abide by this noise ordinance), only one ("ranked like 22nd") major university, poor mass transit options for a city its size (the "underground subways", "two streetcar lines" and "two commuter lines" are all fairly new developments/proposals), and the SFH neighborhoods (that now are supposedly "all vertical" all of the sudden) don't necessarily place Seattle at that "worldly" elite level that it thinks it is at (and clearly Seattlites like you think it is!). He's saying it takes a bit more and/or that Seattle is a bit overrated, that's all. That's not really a stretch, either.

But I believe the topic of the thread was "can places like Seattle hang with their larger counterparts like Atlanta, Detroit and/or Miami?". Should the OP place a check mark for "yes" for you?
I think the better question is whether places like Atlanta can hang with Seattle.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2012, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,951,576 times
Reputation: 2644
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Most of Atlanta's suburbs aren't very urban? Newflash!

I wouldn't hold up Detroit as an example of urbanity over Atlanta when they are on much the same level...
First of all I was replying to someone who said Detroit suburbs aren't urban and then said Atlanta is very urban. That's why I stated neither Atlanta or it's suburbs are very urban. "newsflash"

Detroit and Atlanta are NOT on the same level as far as being urban goes. Southfield maybe, but not Detroit. If that was the case than Atlanta would have the same population within it's city limits since both cities are the same size land wise. Atlanta does have the rail and a few neighborhoods like downtown, midtown, and maybe bucktown but mostly on a suburban maze like street system. Detroit is on the street grid system, has many storefronts lining up for miles along major/ semi major streets and around 20-50 homes on the average city block. Nowhere near the same. Not saying Detroit is Tokyo or Atlanta is any less of a city. But we all know they both are 2 different types of cities in this category.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2012, 04:52 PM
 
6,610 posts, read 7,458,727 times
Reputation: 4141
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarvinStrong313 View Post
First of all I was replying to someone who said Detroit suburbs aren't urban and then said Atlanta is very urban. That's why I stated neither Atlanta or it's suburbs are very urban. "newsflash"

Detroit and Atlanta are NOT on the same level as far as being urban goes. Southfield maybe, but not Detroit. If that was the case than Atlanta would have the same population within it's city limits since both cities are the same size land wise. Atlanta does have the rail and a few neighborhoods like downtown, midtown, and maybe bucktown but mostly on a suburban maze like street system. Detroit is on the street grid system, has many storefronts lining up for miles along major/ semi major streets and around 20-50 homes on the average city block. Nowhere near the same. Not saying Detroit is Tokyo or Atlanta is any less of a city. But we all know they both are 2 different types of cities in this category.
Simply having streets on a grid system does not make Detroit more urban than Atlanta, nor does a higher city population. What does make a difference is all of those empty/uninhabited lots that make Detroit so desolate in some areas. I don't see that as urbanity.

Bucktown? You obviously don't know much about Atlanta...and you seem to have a stereotypical idea about the city that isn't factual.

Last edited by JoeTarheel; 09-08-2012 at 05:15 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,951,576 times
Reputation: 2644
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Simply having streets on a grid system does not make Detroit more urban than Atlanta, nor does a higher city population. What does make a difference is all of those empty/uninhabited lots that make Detroit so desolate in some areas. I don't see that as urbanity.

Bucktown? You obviously don't know much about Atlanta...and you seem to have a stereotypical idea about the city that isn't factual.
Your not getting it. I said they are 2 different types of cities in the urban category. And you right, it doesn't make it any more urban until the density of those neighborhoods come to play. Which in this case the average neighborhood in Detroit is denser than the average neighborhood in Atlanta. I'm not talking about some empty areas that no one even pays attention to compared to the average Atlanta neighborhood. I don't see it as urbanity either but hardly anyone lives there so why should you?

Oh I'm SORRY for that little mistake, BUCKHEAD. Happy now?
And I have been to Atlanta a few times in quite a few neighborhoods to have an idea of what the average neighborhood is like in Atlanta. Sometimes you can almost forget your in a big city when your in the middle of them. Maybe it's all the trees
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 01:48 PM
 
6,610 posts, read 7,458,727 times
Reputation: 4141
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarvinStrong313 View Post
Your not getting it. I said they are 2 different types of cities in the urban category. And you right, it doesn't make it any more urban until the density of those neighborhoods come to play. Which in this case the average neighborhood in Detroit is denser than the average neighborhood in Atlanta. I'm not talking about some empty areas that no one even pays attention to compared to the average Atlanta neighborhood. I don't see it as urbanity either but hardly anyone lives there so why should you?

Oh I'm SORRY for that little mistake, BUCKHEAD. Happy now?
And I have been to Atlanta a few times in quite a few neighborhoods to have an idea of what the average neighborhood is like in Atlanta. Sometimes you can almost forget your in a big city when your in the middle of them. Maybe it's all the trees
Well, then we totally disagree...and I would think you might know that it's Buckhead (rather than "Bucktown") if you've been to Atlanta "a few times". I'm not buying it. You're opinions of Atlanta sound like the typical view of someone who doesn't have any experience here and is going by what he/she has heard.

If you want to believe that Detroit is more urban than Atlanta then that is up to you. Feel free.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 02:18 PM
 
7,073 posts, read 7,523,673 times
Reputation: 6000
I'm an Atlanta resident and lived in Downtown(GSU student) for 2 years and I can tell you Atlanta is not that urban at all. Other then the main CBD(Downtown/Midtown) and small neighborhoods outside of this, it is suburban. There are even UNDEVELOPED areas inside of the Atlanta city limits and it does make it seem like you're in the country.

I hate to bash on Atlanta, but yeah....you don't come to Atlanta to experience urbanity. It is just not dense enough yet....Midtown is just too small of an area and it seems many people here hate Downtown.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 02:26 PM
 
6,610 posts, read 7,458,727 times
Reputation: 4141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
I'm an Atlanta resident and lived in Downtown(GSU student) for 2 years and I can tell you Atlanta is not that urban at all. Other then the main CBD(Downtown/Midtown) and small neighborhoods outside of this, it is suburban. There are even UNDEVELOPED areas inside of the Atlanta city limits and it does make it seem like you're in the country.

I hate to bash on Atlanta, but yeah....you don't come to Atlanta to experience urbanity. It is just not dense enough yet....Midtown is just too small of an area and it seems many people here hate Downtown.
Well, you can't really discount downtown Atlanta and the surrounding neighborhoods and then say Atlanta isn't urban. You've disregarded the most urban areas of the city.

You do realize that every city has undeveloped areas within the city limits, right?

Last edited by JoeTarheel; 09-09-2012 at 03:36 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 02:38 PM
 
7,073 posts, read 7,523,673 times
Reputation: 6000
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Well, you can't really discount downtown Atlanat and the surrounding neighborhoods and then say Atlanta isn't urban. You've disregarded the most urban areas of the city.

You do realize that every city has undeveloped areas within the city limits, right?
Maybe this is what city-data was talking about when they said people from Atlanta love to boost their city. Let's be honest. Atlanta is not more urban then Detroit at it's core. It just isn't. You can walk 5 minutes from North Midtown and be in the surburban areas of Sherwood Forest and Ansley park...When I walked through there, I asked myself, if I was still in Atlanta.

Obviously, most cbd's are urban. Most Downtowns in mid-size-major cities are urban. But there isn't a continuous urban fabric throughout much of the city. There are small neighborhoods that go from urban to suburban in a heartbeat.

Atlanta main urban neighborhoods ARE Downtown, Midtown, ad the Buckhead-Peachtree Str. Corridor, then you have other small neighborhoods like Virginia Highlands, Old 4th Ward, Castleberry hill, West Midtown...etc...but these are small neighborhoods and they aren't continuous with the Downtown/Midtown areas.

Compare this with say, New York where there areas are continuous urban fabric interwoven without any breaks.

Obv, most cities aren't New York, but Chicago, Boston and even LA has a continuous urban fabric for at least 2 miles outside of the CBD.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2012, 03:35 PM
 
6,610 posts, read 7,458,727 times
Reputation: 4141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Maybe this is what city-data was talking about when they said people from Atlanta love to boost their city. Let's be honest. Atlanta is not more urban then Detroit at it's core. It just isn't. You can walk 5 minutes from North Midtown and be in the surburban areas of Sherwood Forest and Ansley park...When I walked through there, I asked myself, if I was still in Atlanta.

Obviously, most cbd's are urban. Most Downtowns in mid-size-major cities are urban. But there isn't a continuous urban fabric throughout much of the city. There are small neighborhoods that go from urban to suburban in a heartbeat.

Atlanta main urban neighborhoods ARE Downtown, Midtown, ad the Buckhead-Peachtree Str. Corridor, then you have other small neighborhoods like Virginia Highlands, Old 4th Ward, Castleberry hill, West Midtown...etc...but these are small neighborhoods and they aren't continuous with the Downtown/Midtown areas.

Compare this with say, New York where there areas are continuous urban fabric interwoven without any breaks.

Obv, most cities aren't New York, but Chicago, Boston and even LA has a continuous urban fabric for at least 2 miles outside of the CBD.
I'm just stating my opinion about the two cities in question, and I don't see any more urbanity in the core of Detroit than I do in the core of Atlanta. You can have your opinion, but I still have mine and it isn't based on your claim of boosterism - it's an honest opinion based on my experiences with the two cities.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:09 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top