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Old 07-06-2023, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,912 posts, read 2,093,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
Blizzards and tornados say hi.
Do you mean snowstorms (which is really just any snowfall), or blizzards?

Meteorological blizzards are actually extremely rare in Midwestern metropolitan areas. For the NWS to issue a Blizzard Warning, you need sustained winds or frequent gusts over 35 mph, reducing visibility from falling and/or blowing snow to under 1/4 mile for 3+ consecutive hours.

That being said, neither snowstorms nor blizzards are necessarily "natural disasters". I've never lost my home or seen my city be destroyed by a snow event.
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Old 07-06-2023, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,186 posts, read 9,080,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
Blizzards and tornados say hi.
Tornadoes usually don't make it that far north, but the upper Midwest is plenty snowy.

Tornadoes are more of a Central Plains thing, though I've noticed they've been drifting southeastward of late.
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Old 07-06-2023, 03:27 PM
 
543 posts, read 559,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Tornadoes usually don't make it that far north, but the upper Midwest is plenty snowy.

Tornadoes are more of a Central Plains thing, though I've noticed they've been drifting southeastward of late.
Dixie Alley's been a thing for forever (or, at least the 1800s). It's just that the area was pretty sparsely populated and not easy to see great distances (hills and forests). It more became known as Dixie Alley once Doppler Radar became more plausible for surveilling weather.
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Old 07-06-2023, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,912 posts, read 2,093,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Tornadoes usually don't make it that far north, but the upper Midwest is plenty snowy.

Tornadoes are more of a Central Plains thing, though I've noticed they've been drifting southeastward of late.
Agreed. Tornadoes are certainly possible in the Upper Midwest, but the extremely powerful, town-erasing mega-outbreaks aren't really a thing up here. I'd say that derechos are a much, much bigger threat for the Upper Midwest.
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