U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-04-2012, 12:30 PM
 
1,750 posts, read 2,962,105 times
Reputation: 771

Advertisements

I would say LA because of the difference in size.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-04-2012, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,481,043 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
You'll say L.A. for what? Which question are you answering? Are you referring to the amount of total buildings over 10 stories or how many buildings L.A. will build that are over 20-70 stories in the future?
I'd say it goes like this 1-7 stories, LA. 7-20 stories, DC. 20+ LA.

LA has a huge advantage in size, plus doesn't count other areas (at least I'm assuming) outside the city with high-rises like Santa Monica and the Sunset Strip.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 12:39 PM
 
9,908 posts, read 11,780,167 times
Reputation: 2452
Quote:
Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
I would say LA because of the difference in size.
L.A. is by far larger than D.C. yet the buildings in the city are relatively short according to the database in reference. Only 600 buildings in the entire city are 10 stories or taller. D.C. has a much larger concentration of highrise building density so the size of the cities would not be relevant honestly. Munchitup said most buildings being built in LA are wood framed and shorter than 10 stories. Is that not the case? If that is true, then D.C. will most likely pass L.A. since all of the buildings being built in NOMA, Capitol Riverfront, SW Waterfront, and Mt. Vernon Triangle are 10-14 stories with undergound parking.

Last edited by MDAllstar; 12-04-2012 at 01:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,481,043 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
L.A. is by far larger than D.C. yet the buildings in the city are relatively short according to the database in reference. Only 600 buildings in the entire city are 10 stories or taller. D.C. has a much larger concentration of highrise building density so the size of the cities would not be relevant honestly. Munchitup said most buildings being built in LA are wood framed and shorter than 10 stories. Is that not the case? If that is true, then D.C. will most likely pass L.A. since all of the buildings in NOMA, Capitol Riverfront, SW Waterfront, and Mt. Vernon Triangle are 10-14 stories.
LA and DC are similar in that they are generally dense, low-rise cities. LA just has a lot of skyscrapers now, scattered around the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Piedmont, CA/São Paulo, Brazil
33,235 posts, read 56,738,871 times
Reputation: 16310
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I'd say it goes like this 1-7 stories, LA. 7-20 stories, DC. 20+ LA.

LA has a huge advantage in size, plus doesn't count other areas (at least I'm assuming) outside the city with high-rises like Santa Monica and the Sunset Strip.
Also, according to Emporis:

Buildings taller than 200 feet:
Los Angeles 98
Washington DC 7
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,742 posts, read 8,744,987 times
Reputation: 7884
This is a pretty pointless discussion over semantics, skyscraperpage is not accurate- you can ask Dylan LeBlanc himself (I know him personally). It's just an estimate & it's very off for every city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 01:21 PM
 
9,908 posts, read 11,780,167 times
Reputation: 2452
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Also, according to Emporis:

Buildings taller than 200 feet:
Los Angeles 98
Washington DC 7

I wonder what buildings are taller than 200 feet for D.C.? The height restrictions don't allow buildings that tall. They must be talking about churches and the old post office building Donald Trump is making into the International Trump Hotel.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 01:24 PM
 
9,908 posts, read 11,780,167 times
Reputation: 2452
Quote:
Originally Posted by valentro View Post
This is a pretty pointless discussion over semantics, skyscraperpage is not accurate- you can ask Dylan LeBlanc himself (I know him personally). It's just an estimate & it's very off for every city.

Interesting. Is it because he doesn't keep up with buildings going up in each city? What does he use to keep track of buildings etc? Is there some sort of database?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 01:29 PM
 
Location: The City
22,377 posts, read 33,043,295 times
Reputation: 7799
Is there much green/LEED building going on DC among the taller buildings. It would seem impractical in DC given the height limitations and general higher sloor height of green building. For example the Comcast building (believe still the tallest LEED certified building) is only like 50 stories at nearly 1,000 ft

Never thought about it but would make for inefficient sq footage it would seem when you cant build up
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2012, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,742 posts, read 8,744,987 times
Reputation: 7884
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Interesting. Is it because he doesn't keep up with buildings going up in each city? What does he use to keep track of buildings etc? Is there some sort of database?
He goes by blocks, it's just a rough estimate- nothing more. That's why you wont be able to get any information on any buildings beyond a certain point- the site just says it "exists" without really existing.

For example, he goes with whats in the area. If there's a multitude number of 8 story buildings in a certain section of the city then he assumes every block will be the same way. He's not very accurate with his information which is constantly updated on a near daily basis (try using the database after 1 AM sometimes- it's down for maintenance) but it's still pretty far fetched from what actually exists. It's just relative, it's a good indication of what's there without having accurate numbers.

Plus Dylan doesn't have that kind of time anymore, he moved overseas for other ventures- he hardly cares about the database anymore to update it frequently or accurately.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top