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Old 03-17-2013, 11:30 PM
 
5,365 posts, read 6,284,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
A metro area of over 4 million people the economy sucks? What's so bad about it?
Tampa's metro is no where near 4 million. The census estimates put us at about 2.8 million.

The economy sucks because for decades the only thing holding this metro economy up was the housing market and hospitality/service jobs. Even today, about the best type of job you can hope to find in this city would be as a part time waiter.

I am very lucky. Tampa only has one major company headquartered here and I happen to work for them. I really wish I had other options though......
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
7,010 posts, read 11,867,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtinmemphis View Post
A fast growing metro area without a stable economy isn't good for Tampa!. Also the 2020 prediction with Nashville knocking on Cleveland door is unbelievable?

I thought Atlanta would be larger than Miami? I guess not.
Nashville metro is HUGE...it encompasses so many counties, the density rate there is so low, it stretches from southern Kentucky to northern Alabama.

I always thought Atlanta was larger than Miamia also, it sure looks and feels bigger. Which is growing faster?
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Old 03-18-2013, 12:18 AM
 
7,065 posts, read 8,820,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Nashville metro is HUGE...it encompasses so many counties, the density rate there is so low, it stretches from southern Kentucky to northern Alabama.

I always thought Atlanta was larger than Miamia also, it sure looks and feels bigger. Which is growing faster?
I didn't know that metro Nashville covers 3 states. But yes the density is low.

From the looks of things Miami is growing faster now. Maybe Atlantas growth is slowing. That may work in its favor. I know they have some awesome projects that will be worked out over the next few years that could take it to the next level.
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Franklin, TN
6,662 posts, read 13,231,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Nashville metro is HUGE...it encompasses so many counties, the density rate there is so low, it stretches from southern Kentucky to northern Alabama.
True, our metro is huge...primarily because, unlike places like Cleveland, there aren't many employment centers of significant size within 100 miles of town.

Also, to make a distinction...Nashville's metro borders Kentucky, but not Alabama. Our CSA touches Alabama (via Lawrenceburg/Lawrence County).

Metro-wise, the huge number of counties only contribute slightly to the population.

The metro (14 counties) covers 6,301.8 square miles, at 1,726,693. The density for the whole area is 274 ppsm. The core of the metro (5 counties) covers 2,806.3 square miles (44% of the land) and has 1,400,744 people (81% of the population)...which rounds out to 499 people per square mile. That is by no means a high number, but I hate "density" arguments with large area metros because it lumps in tons of rural land.

We have 5 counties in our metro that add up to 1,613.8 square miles that contribute just 87,376. That severely dilutes the "density" while adding essentially nothing as far as population. But they're included because they are rural counties without a lot of jobs, and commute to the suburban counties.
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,607 posts, read 2,816,082 times
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^The metro is 14 counties? Do you mean CSA? That's not a metro. The census said you should not use it as such.

Last edited by unusualfire; 03-18-2013 at 02:56 AM..
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Franklin, TN
6,662 posts, read 13,231,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
^The metro is 14 counties? Do you mean CSA? that's not a metro. The census said you should not use it as such.
The metro is 14 counties. The CSA is 17.
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Mahoning Valley, Ohio
416 posts, read 695,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Elsewhere, I feel bad for Ohio. Cincinnati and Columbus are the only MSAs in Ohio with both a year-over-year increase and an increase since 2010. Canton had a year-over-year increase, but has decreased since 2010. Dayton is the reverse, with a year-over-year decrease, but an increase since 2010. Every other MSA in Ohio has been steadily losing population, according to the estimates.
Why? I don't feel bad for Pennsylvania. Western Pennsylvania is hemorrhaging people, and other "mid-sized" metro regions are declining. Most of Pennsylvania's population growth is coming from Eastern PA, and large numbers of Hispanics moving in are helping boost the numbers in places like Hazelton, Lebanon, and Allentown. Great news for diversity and investment due to the fact that central Pennsylvania has been devoid of anything like this new current wave of growth for decades.

Dayton is similar to Pittsburgh with recent estimates showing a reverse. Overall, the Dayton MSA grew by .22% to Pittsburgh's .19% in the 2010 census to 2012 estimates. Other estimates show the exact same outcomes in Dayton proper and Montgomery County, just like Pittsburgh city and Allegheny County.
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Mahoning Valley, Ohio
416 posts, read 695,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Tampa's metro is no where near 4 million. The census estimates put us at about 2.8 million.

The economy sucks because for decades the only thing holding this metro economy up was the housing market and hospitality/service jobs. Even today, about the best type of job you can hope to find in this city would be as a part time waiter.

I am very lucky. Tampa only has one major company headquartered here and I happen to work for them. I really wish I had other options though......
Exactly why I am glad I didn't go to graduate school at USF.
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
14,164 posts, read 22,522,154 times
Reputation: 17305
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMahValley View Post
Why? I don't feel bad for Pennsylvania. Western Pennsylvania is hemorrhaging people, and other "mid-sized" metro regions are declining. Most of Pennsylvania's population growth is coming from Eastern PA, and large numbers of Hispanics moving in are helping boost the numbers in places like Hazelton, Lebanon, and Allentown. Great news for diversity and investment due to the fact that central Pennsylvania has been devoid of anything like this new current wave of growth for decades.
I never said anything about Pennsylvania, but since you did...


Pennsylvania MSA population change (2010-2012)

+1.42% - Lancaster
+1.26% - Lebanon
+1.11% - Chambersburg
+0.91% - Williamsport
+0.90% - Philadelphia
+0.82% - Harrisburg
+0.77% - State College
+0.73% - Allentown/Bethlehem
+0.66% - York
+0.50% - Reading
+0.19% - Pittsburgh
+0.03% - Altoona
+0.03% - Erie
-0.00% - Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
-0.37% - Bloomsburg
-0.61% - Stroudsburg
-1.46% - Johnstown


So where's the "hemorrhage" in western Pennsylvania? Johnstown doesn't represent the entire region. Erie and Altoona are flat, and Pittsburgh is growing slightly. If there's a hemorrhage anywhere in Pennsylvania, it's in its northeastern quadrant.


Ohio MSA population change (2010-2012)

+2.21% - Columbus
+0.66% - Cincinnati
+0.22% - Dayton
-0.13% - Akron
-0.21% - Toledo
-0.24% - Canton
-0.66% - Cleveland
-0.81% - Springfield
-1.12% - Lima
-1.34% - Youngstown
-1.45% - Mansfield

It appears that all the growth in Ohio is in its southwestern quadrant. Nowhere else has any MSA grown since 2010.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMahValley View Post
Dayton is similar to Pittsburgh with recent estimates showing a reverse. Overall, the Dayton MSA grew by .22% to Pittsburgh's .19% in the 2010 census to 2012 estimates. Other estimates show the exact same outcomes in Dayton proper and Montgomery County, just like Pittsburgh city and Allegheny County.
One difference between Dayton and Pittsburgh is that Pittsburgh has increased in population both year-over-year and since 2010, whereas Dayton had a year-over-year decrease despite having grown since 2010. It's also worth noting that birth rates are higher in Ohio than they are in Pennsylvania, which should provide an extra boost.
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
654 posts, read 1,898,884 times
Reputation: 911
Miami's CSA now reaches to Vero Beach? It's 138 miles!
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