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Old 03-18-2013, 05:11 PM
 
233 posts, read 527,930 times
Reputation: 119

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think it's probably international migration that fuels a large part of Miami's growth.
True, Miami is in the top three for international immigration, but it has recently had a very strong domestic immigration rate as well for reasons I'm not sure. The only area of population growth it lags the top growing areas like Washington, Houston, and Dallas is natural birth rate, which is much slower in SFL especially compared to Houston and Dallas which have extremely high birth rates.
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Old 03-18-2013, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Franklin, TN
6,662 posts, read 13,258,832 times
Reputation: 7612
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Nashville has had similar growth rates to Atlanta the past few decades, hasn't it? It isn't nearly as big because Nashville has never been a big city.
Nashville has been in the upper tier of cities in terms of growth rate since the 90s...but still behind Atlanta in terms of percentage. Only recently have we past them (in terms of estimates) in percentage growth...in terms of raw growth, Atlanta is still growing probably 3x faster.

We're about where Atlanta was in 1970.
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,574 posts, read 10,684,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post

Nashville has had similar growth rates to Atlanta the past few decades, hasn't it? It isn't nearly as big because Nashville has never been a big city.
The reason Atlanta was a big city earlier is the reason we are today and not just some city taking in the favorable climates, taxes and scenery.

We are the premiere rail hub of the south caused by a luck of geography.

It is the northern most point for a rail junction to switch cargo between the midwest, the northeast and the rest of the south...sort of a lynchpin.

Incindently, we were historically able to get materials and goods from each areas of the country cheaper, than other parts of the region.

Atlanta was an ideal place to take raw materials from different regions, manufacture a final good, and then ship it back out for trade.

We still benefit from this today, but our next selling point is an air hub roughly half way between south Florida and Chicago and half way between NYC and the Texas Triangle. 80% of the US population is within a 2 hour flight of ATL.

We were also able to cash in our earlier success and educate our pool of workers, which makes us compete well.

Nasvhville's big pro is that the interstate system was able to create more routes across the Appalachians the rails could not (with operational efficiency). They have, in more recent history, benefited from being a southern alternative trucking hub to Atlanta's interstates and the midwest.
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Austin/Houston
2,930 posts, read 5,238,398 times
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Since when did The Woodlands displace Baytown as a principal city in Houston's MSA?
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
20,500 posts, read 33,299,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoneclaw View Post
Since when did The Woodlands displace Baytown as a principal city in Houston's MSA?
Heck. I loved how they took Galveston out of the picture.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
3,121 posts, read 3,075,437 times
Reputation: 2311
I'm not comfortable living in a declining metro.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Orlando
109 posts, read 127,473 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
My mom keeps begging me to move to Orlando instead of move out of state. Haha. My mother (and her whole family in fact) moved to Florida from Kentucky. None of them can possibly understand why someone would want to leave this state. I hate it here. The first chance I get I am moving to the Northeast.
Maybe... We are related? Just kidding lol, i'll also being movind to the northeast, DC to be exact.
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Tippecanoe County, Indiana
26,372 posts, read 46,199,122 times
Reputation: 19454
Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
I'm not comfortable living in a declining metro.
Upstate NY will never improve much as long as Downstate has so much influence. NY should be two states.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:32 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,966 posts, read 24,000,674 times
Reputation: 14759
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Miami is one of the few cities in America that saw population growth get bigger post recession. I have no idea why.
All I can say is that I see an awful lot of strollers in my hood in South Beach.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,830,390 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Atlanta should never have dabbled in the real estate bubble as extensively as it did. Outside of Florida it has had the worst real estate collapse in the South. My roommate has two condos in Midtown and the value on both just continues to drop year after year. The city also never brought its unemployment rate down, which is still above 8% (not sure why).
A explains B, unfortunately. The big housing bubble means a lot of leveraged households and a collapse of the construction market. This creates low expectations and high unemployment.

Though, there are worse places than 8%, which is just above the national average (though worse than many major cities).
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