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Old 05-27-2013, 05:53 PM
 
2,423 posts, read 4,296,184 times
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Paris lost population for decades, decades and decades and look at it now. Chicago seems to go seesawing with it population in the last couple of decades. As long as we aren't bleeding like Detroit or growing faster than is sustainable like Houston, I am a ok with our population.
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
Paris lost population for decades, decades and decades and look at it now. Chicago seems to go seesawing with it population in the last couple of decades. As long as we aren't bleeding like Detroit or growing faster than is sustainable like Houston, I am a ok with our population.
Good for you pal
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,671 posts, read 7,345,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
Paris lost population for decades, decades and decades and look at it now. Chicago seems to go seesawing with it population in the last couple of decades. As long as we aren't bleeding like Detroit or growing faster than is sustainable like Houston, I am a ok with our population.
Yep, and the same thing can be said for cities like D.C., Minneapolis, Boston...heck even San Francisco recorded three decades straight of population loss.
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:00 PM
 
7,237 posts, read 12,691,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
Paris lost population for decades, decades and decades and look at it now. Chicago seems to go seesawing with it population in the last couple of decades. As long as we aren't bleeding like Detroit or growing faster than is sustainable like Houston, I am a ok with our population.
Agreed. Chicago will be fine.
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: So California
8,704 posts, read 11,050,447 times
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Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Yep, and the same thing can be said for cities like D.C., Minneapolis, Boston...heck even San Francisco recorded three decades straight of population loss.
Not only those but Philly and Gotham itself, NYC.....
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:32 PM
 
178 posts, read 282,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
Paris lost population for decades, decades and decades and look at it now. Chicago seems to go seesawing with it population in the last couple of decades. As long as we aren't bleeding like Detroit or growing faster than is sustainable like Houston, I am a ok with our population.
But this isn't true. Chicago is not "seesawing with its population". If you trust the Census (and I admit they might not be perfect), Chicago has had non-stop population decline for 60 years.

And Paris' population has been gaining for decades. Paris is gaining, like Houston.
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:33 PM
 
178 posts, read 282,709 times
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Originally Posted by slo1318 View Post
Not only those but Philly and Gotham itself, NYC.....
Right, but NYC has never had more than one Census with a decline.

There has been huge NYC growth since 1980. In contrast, Chicago has had a huge decline since 1980. Just to put it into perspective, the net population growth in NYC since 1980 amounts to adding more than half of the city of Chicago to NYC's population. That's pretty crazy for an older U.S. city.

Philly has also shown a decline since 1980, but nowhere near as dramatic as in Chicago, and showed a gain in 2010, so the three cities have different population trends.
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:39 PM
 
178 posts, read 282,709 times
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Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Congress went Republican in 1994 and then went Democrat in 2006. Your argument holds no water.
Except that's exactly what I'm talking about. Thanks for confirming my point.

You determine the Decennial Census methodology following the most recent Census. Congress was Democrat in 1991, and Republican in 2001 (the two relevant years).
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Arizona
3,763 posts, read 6,676,209 times
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Originally Posted by Almont1 View Post
Except that's exactly what I'm talking about. Thanks for confirming my point.

You determine the Decennial Census methodology following the most recent Census. Congress was Democrat in 1991, and Republican in 2001 (the two relevant years).
Guys I think this is Broadripple with a new user name.
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Old 05-28-2013, 12:59 AM
 
Location: So California
8,704 posts, read 11,050,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Almont1 View Post
Right, but NYC has never had more than one Census with a decline.

There has been huge NYC growth since 1980. In contrast, Chicago has had a huge decline since 1980. Just to put it into perspective, the net population growth in NYC since 1980 amounts to adding more than half of the city of Chicago to NYC's population. That's pretty crazy for an older U.S. city.

Philly has also shown a decline since 1980, but nowhere near as dramatic as in Chicago, and showed a gain in 2010, so the three cities have different population trends.
NYC lost population in the 1960 and 1980 cencus. Philly had 5 decades of decline losing a quarter of it population. It did make a slight gain in the last census, just as current estimates are showing modest gains in Philly and Chicago.
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