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Old 07-21-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,979 posts, read 1,818,612 times
Reputation: 1383

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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
"How can New Orleans be more internationally recognized than ... Cincinnati?" "How can Charleston have more prestige than... Chattanooga?" "Why do people like Savannah more than... Fayetteville?" "Why do people want to visit New York more than... St. Louis?"

City Data has lots of threads like these. Some posters might want to remember that we do live on Earth. Remember Earth? The planet with an atmosphere and one moon? The one in which French fries are generally considered more fun than saltines? That Earth?

New Orleans: one of the prettiest and most historic cities in N. America, with perhaps the best food in the country (not just fancy restaurants where you pay $250 + wine and tip, but can shop in real food shops, bakeries, cafes, and get a nice po-boy on almost every block.

Cincinnati: a bland Middle American city on the border of the Middle West and South, with Midwestern charm and Southern social progress. You come to Cincinnati if you want to work for P&G and to contemplate the city's "enormous potential" over a plate of sausages or a tub of hot wings.

Come back to Earth, folks. Please.
Having a good time is being on the street in a vibrant area with a drink in your hand rather than strolling down a CBD munching on a sauerkraut. Let's be honest here. Some cities specialize in catering to the visitor better than others that's how it's always been and always will be.
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Old 07-21-2013, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Denver
16,030 posts, read 24,332,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastphilly View Post
The word is "Globally" meaning appealing to a sizable draw from overseas visitors. Even Orlando and Las Vegas have direct international flights overseas. New Orleans has NONE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastphilly View Post
I think you are missing the point. If New Orleans was such a global draw you would have foreign carriers flying in from major foreign destinations.
If you walk around the CBD or Quarter during earlier hours it's easy to hear different languages and accents from around the world.

Last year, nearly 40 million people visited Vegas, Orlando gets about 50 million now. New Orleans clocked in at just over 9 million last year.
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Old 07-21-2013, 04:06 PM
 
Location: San Diego
1,765 posts, read 3,444,940 times
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I think the bottom line is that it isn't about architectural similarities, it's about the culture. The culture in Cincinnati is pretty much typically Midwestern, while New Orleans is about as unique as one can find in the U.S.

It was a better comparison on the city vs. city thread when New Orleans was compared to Montreal. Cincinnati doesn't really fit in with that conversation.
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Old 07-21-2013, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 9,652,371 times
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I agree. You can even tell from just the food it is a melting pot. It has the American Southern culture, but also has a lot of Latino and Caribbean immigrants due to its location. But also has a big Vietnamese population, and other Asians. It is growing to be more and more diverse and many businesses are doing well there, and moving there.
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Old 07-21-2013, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Denver
16,030 posts, read 24,332,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wh15395 View Post
It was a better comparison on the city vs. city thread when New Orleans was compared to Montreal. Cincinnati doesn't really fit in with that conversation.
I like the comparisons with the older cities like St. Louis, Memphis, Cincy, Louisville, and Mobile.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
I agree. You can even tell from just the food it is a melting pot. It has the American Southern culture, but also has a lot of Latino and Caribbean immigrants due to its location. But also has a big Vietnamese population, and other Asians. It is growing to be more and more diverse and many businesses are doing well there, and moving there.
It doesn't have much of typical southern culture at all.
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Old 07-21-2013, 06:57 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,979 posts, read 1,818,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I like the comparisons with the older cities like St. Louis, Memphis, Cincy, Louisville, and Mobile.

It doesn't have much of typical southern culture at all.

I agree it doesn't have much southern culture. It's a culture all it's own. The problem I have with the term globally is the city represents one culture but has little to offer towards other cultures around the world compared to some of the more prominent US cities that are "Global".
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:18 PM
 
865 posts, read 1,398,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastphilly View Post
Right and Chiquita pulled up stakes and dumped Cincy for Charlotte for that very reason.
A lot of good it did them. They lost $408 million in 2012 after their big move.
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Denver
16,030 posts, read 24,332,390 times
Reputation: 12252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastphilly View Post
I agree it doesn't have much southern culture. It's a culture all it's own. The problem I have with the term globally is the city represents one culture but has little to offer towards other cultures around the world compared to some of the more prominent US cities that are "Global".
How does a melting pot represent one culture? I mean, there aren't any Italian or Latino neighborhoods and the Chinatown (which was the largest in the south) sat where the current CBD does, the Chinese subsequently moved to Jefferson Parish and other areas around the metro. The food is a blend of many different styles and so is the culture. It's not New York but it's not Fargo either.
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:35 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 13,661,741 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
"How can New Orleans be more internationally recognized than ... Cincinnati?" "How can Charleston have more prestige than... Chattanooga?" "Why do people like Savannah more than... Fayetteville?" "Why do people want to visit New York more than... St. Louis?"

City Data has lots of threads like these. Some posters might want to remember that we do live on Earth. Remember Earth? The planet with an atmosphere and one moon? The one in which French fries are generally considered more fun than saltines? That Earth?

New Orleans: one of the prettiest and most historic cities in N. America, with perhaps the best food in the country (not just fancy restaurants where you pay $250 + wine and tip, but can shop in real food shops, bakeries, cafes, and get a nice po-boy on almost every block.

Cincinnati: a bland Middle American city on the border of the Middle West and South, with Midwestern charm and Southern social progress. You come to Cincinnati if you want to work for P&G and to contemplate the city's "enormous potential" over a plate of sausages or a tub of hot wings.

Come back to Earth, folks. Please.
There is definitely some awesome, historic architecture in the city, but "pretty" (which suggests a softer beauty) isn't a word I'd use to describe New Orleans.

Cincinnati has plenty of historic architecture itself, plus, when you add the hills and forests, you end up with a much more attractive area overall. New Orleans is no competition for southern Ohio in the fall.
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Old 07-21-2013, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Denver
16,030 posts, read 24,332,390 times
Reputation: 12252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
There is definitely some awesome, historic architecture in the city, but "pretty" (which suggests a softer beauty) isn't a word I'd use to describe New Orleans.

Cincinnati has plenty of historic architecture itself, plus, when you add the hills and forests, you end up with a much more attractive area overall. New Orleans is no competition for southern Ohio in the fall.
The cities parks and Jackson Square, French Market, and Uptown near Tulane is beautiful but all in all, you are correct.

I would assume Cincy is much prettier on average though.
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