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Old 01-14-2014, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Los Altos Hills, CA
36,655 posts, read 67,499,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
I briefly read their paper, and it seems that they are judging cities based on what their calling "social connections" (i.e. economic connections) to other cities. In other words, their relative pull on the cities in their region and globally, in terms of economic contributions.
Thank you.

Did you happen to see how they defined 'social connections'?
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Old 01-14-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,526 posts, read 3,050,536 times
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It looks as though they've realigned the criteria used in separating cities into "alpha", "beta", etc. Most US cities seem to have moved down on the list. They do tend to be very Eurocentric; so a lot of relatively minor European capitals appear, arguably, at unnaturally high positions on the list.

Their methodology has always seemed a bit muddled--relying heavily on the presence of professional services (law, advertising, finance, accounting, etc.) and inter-connectivity with other "world cities". They've been publishing this list since 2000, and each publication seems to bring a few highly-suspect results. For example, Philadelphia was in the middle of the "gamma" list in 2008. It jumped to the bottom of the "alpha" list (a more rational spot for the city--sixty-one positions higher!) in 2010. On this most recent list, it's dropped back down to the middle of the "beta" category.
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Old 01-14-2014, 07:12 PM
 
1,635 posts, read 2,712,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Miami is a major financial and business center for Latin America. I can sort of see that making it pretty high. Atlanta I don't understand unless it has a lot to do with the airport (for interconnectivity). Houston is obviously the energy capital of the U.S. and Dallas is no slouch. I'd probably put them all at Beta+ with the possible exception of Miami.
I agree with this 100%.
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Old 01-14-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,647 posts, read 8,597,502 times
Reputation: 3776
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Thank you.

Did you happen to see how they defined 'social connections'?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
I briefly read their paper, and it seems that they are judging cities based on what their calling "social connections" (i.e. economic connections) to other cities. In other words, their relative pull on the cities in their region and globally, in terms of economic contributions.
I can sort of understand how that'd work.

Like how many companies in Houston have major regional presence outside of Houston? Does Exxon have any corporate offices in NYC or Los Angeles or Miami?

On the other hand, banks and investment firms located in NYC are likely to have regional offices all over the country and very likely internationally. What downtown doesn't have a skyscraper with Bank of America or AT&T across the top of it?

It's pretty unlikely that someone from Chicago might end up working at Exxon if they never make a move to Houston. At least that's sort of my guess based on the term "economic connections". Regardless of how much economic activity those companies generate, it only seems to count in this list if they're spread out across multiple regional locations. I could be completely wrong about that though.
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Old 01-14-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,836 posts, read 12,004,955 times
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Surprised to see Houston in Beta +, Dallas not so much. But to those saying Miami is over ranked it simply is not in this ranking system. They are big on connectivity. Miami is known as the gateway of the America's not just because of its ports and airports but for business. Miami is arguably the financial capital of Latin America. It is connect to a whole other region like no other city in North America.
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Old 01-14-2014, 08:12 PM
 
Location: PNW
2,011 posts, read 3,460,033 times
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Never have really cared for these lists. Its just the classification of cities by a set of criteria someone had set. Doesn't make one better then the other, economically, politically, or socially.
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Old 01-14-2014, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,616 posts, read 77,596,211 times
Reputation: 19101
Greensboro, Montpelier, Birmingham, and Des Moines make the cut. Pittsburgh doesn't. Yep. This list is very credible.
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Old 01-14-2014, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,413 posts, read 5,124,203 times
Reputation: 3088
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Greensboro, Montpelier, Birmingham, and Des Moines make the cut. Pittsburgh doesn't. Yep. This list is very credible.
Pittsburgh is in there as high sufficiency. The OP missed it on his list.
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Old 01-14-2014, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
159 posts, read 511,361 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post

Sufficiency Cities
San Antonio
Nashville
Sacramento
Providence
Jacksonville
Puebla
Las Vegas
Birmingham
Memphis
Halifax
Ciudad Juarez
Winnipeg
Greensboro
Montpelier
New Orleans
Rocheser
Hamilton
Kingston
Des Moines
Madison
I'm pretty sure that the Montpelier they are referring to is the one in France, not Vermont. I don't see how the latter could be grouped with the rest of those cities.
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Old 01-14-2014, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 5,885,526 times
Reputation: 2692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Interesting shake-up in the Midwest. Minneapolis, Detroit, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Columbus, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Chicago all dropped, and... Cleveland rose... hmm, could there be something to this comeback us Clevelanders have been talking about lately?
Detroit has been at Beta- . Didn't drop at all.

Chicago and even Tokyo has been demoted. I believe Tokyo was just on NYC's level on the last list.
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