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View Poll Results: Which is Toronto more similar to?
US Midwest 63 68.48%
US Northeast 29 31.52%
Voters: 92. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-07-2016, 05:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylover94 View Post
But that is sort of the Boston equivalent of posting a Queens or Staten Island streetview. On the other hand to the north of Boston there is an area almost equal in population and size to Boston of areas that are just as dense with minimal setbacks that is made up of Cambridge, Somerville, Chelsea, Malden, and Everett. This is really off topic anyways my main point is that urban walkable neighborhoods in Toronto seem to have a greater setback on average than Boston.
JP is on two T lines, and only 2.5 miles from the Back Bay, though. While the Toronto homes are set further back than most homes in Boston, I wanted to dispel the myth that the Northeastern cities are all row houses and apartment buildings, set 5 feet off the street.
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Old 10-07-2016, 05:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
semi-detached homes (which are crammed together in rowhouse fashion).
Fashionable? Trying to claim a qualifier like that's still cheating no matter how many pairs of encapsulating brackets be deployed.
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Old 10-07-2016, 05:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
If those stats are true, they confirm that Toronto is like other Great Lakes cities, and not like Northeast Corridor cities, because the % of attached SFH is quite small.

If only 13% of housing in the very core is "semi-detached" or "attached", then it's clear the "attached" number is small (probably <5%), given the fact that semi-detached housing is quite common in inner-city Toronto (and other Great Lakes cities) and rare in the Northeast Corridor.
But in Cleveland and Detroit detached is probably about 90% of SFHs.
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Old 10-07-2016, 05:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
JP is on two T lines, and only 2.5 miles from the Back Bay, though. While the Toronto homes are set further back than most homes in Boston, I wanted to dispel the myth that the Northeastern cities are all row houses and apartment buildings, set 5 feet off the street.
Boston is something of an outlier along the Northeast Corridor and is MUCH less rowhouse oriented than NYC, Philly, Baltimore and DC.

It's still far more rowhouse-oriented than Great Lakes cities, though. There are no core Boston neighborhoods with detached homes, like in Toronto and Chicago.
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Old 10-07-2016, 05:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
But in Cleveland and Detroit detached is probably about 90% of SFHs.
I doubt it. We were comparing city cores only.

Cleveland and Detroit have (or had) a fair number of attached homes in their cores, not unlike Toronto. Many have been lost to abandonment and urban renewal, though. Toronto boomed while these cities declined, so Toronto retained more in the core.
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Old 10-08-2016, 12:57 AM
 
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Anyone have any idea how semi-detached houses are classified in the US census/ACS? 1 unit - attached? 2 units?
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Old 06-27-2017, 05:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Anyone have any idea how semi-detached houses are classified in the US census/ACS? 1 unit - attached? 2 units?
I believe it's 1 unit - attached.
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