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Old 02-20-2018, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,503 posts, read 6,639,261 times
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Okay you can thank the "Seattle Freeze" for this one. Which some say the transients started, and others say that the natives started. Which sounds about right because, well, people are just disrespectful in general. Personally I think that every city has a "freeze" but anyone from Seattle, or familiar with Seattle, can chime in for context.

In true C-D fashion, are places better off for having people move there or has the culture of American cities in general dissipated because of them? Are any cities immune to this; like transients end up transforming into natives over time? Maybe everyone was born in the wrong town and life is just about finding that town that brings you to your true self. Maybe individuality is a misnomer and if we just find a way to fit in to whatever town we find ourselves in, life will be a lot easier.
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Old 02-21-2018, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
2,154 posts, read 1,077,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Okay you can thank the "Seattle Freeze" for this one. Which some say the transients started, and others say that the natives started. Which sounds about right because, well, people are just disrespectful in general. Personally I think that every city has a "freeze" but anyone from Seattle, or familiar with Seattle, can chime in for context.

In true C-D fashion, are places better off for having people move there or has the culture of American cities in general dissipated because of them? Are any cities immune to this; like transients end up transforming into natives over time? Maybe everyone was born in the wrong town and life is just about finding that town that brings you to your true self. Maybe individuality is a misnomer and if we just find a way to fit in to whatever town we find ourselves in, life will be a lot easier.
Transplants tend to respect the cities they move to much more than natives.

I’m a New Yorker who use to hate Transplants until I worked at a job in Manhattan where I was the only native and I realized transplants have More love for the city they move to and want to be part of it. Transplants in NYC love calling themselves New Yorkers as if they just received citizenship.

And I do believe transplants become native over time because I know some New Yorkers who moved to the city before 9/11. I also know some transplants who are older than me and were in NYC before I was born.

I don’t have a particular timeline but I do think you become a native by being part of the cities culture and not standing out as a weirdo!

But this might go back to why people have a disdain for yuppies and would never consider those types to ever be natives!
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Old 02-21-2018, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,184 posts, read 1,522,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
Transplants tend to respect the cities they move to much more than natives.

I’m a New Yorker who use to hate Transplants until I worked at a job in Manhattan where I was the only native and I realized transplants have More love for the city they move to and want to be part of it. Transplants in NYC love calling themselves New Yorkers as if they just received citizenship.

And I do believe transplants become native over time because I know some New Yorkers who moved to the city before 9/11. I also know some transplants who are older than me and were in NYC before I was born.

I don’t have a particular timeline but I do think you become a native by being part of the cities culture and standing out as a weirdo!
New York transplants definitely do undergo an assimilation process after moving here. You can always tell when someone’s new to the city. It’s fun.

I get what you’re saying about transplants having a special appreciation for the city. This is true. Similarly, I learned to appreciate NY a lot more after moving away for a few years to suburban South Jersey. Coming back was one of the best days of my life. I think I almost know that feeling people get when they move to the city for the first time, like you always see in movies and TV.
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Old 02-22-2018, 01:30 AM
 
Location: South Raleigh areas
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Personally, I haven't lived anywhere where transplants didn't assimilate into the local culture; not a single place. I lived in North Carolina for a total of about 5 years (four different brief stays), and I'd definitely say I was assimilating to some degree. I lived in New York State for two years and was definitely assimilating. I think it's in my nature, though, as I grew up constantly moving around, so I think I carry a piece of every place I've lived on me, except Georgia. There is no Georgia within me, and I can't be more thankful lol...

My parents have lived in North Carolina for 13 years come April, and they are assimilated Carolinians; so is my older brother. I'm not sure when it happened, and all three still have some characteristics of their hometowns in them, but my family is assimilated Carolinians....

My mom has been in Georgia for three years in April, and by contrast, she isn't yet assimilated, so there's the other side of the coin...
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Old 02-23-2018, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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I don't know how much assimilation is a conscious process. I've been in Hampton Roads for 10 years and I don't consider myself to be from here. But I see new transplants and they remind me of myself back then, which is odd. I think the experience might be markedly different if I were moving to a New York or Los Angeles.

Another thing about here is that people say that everyone is a transplant but I'm not sure there's any truth in that. A lot are and a lot aren't. A lot move away and come back. I've thought about moving back to where I'm from. And for me it is about the place meeting some unrealistic expectations of what I want a place to be because of what I don't like about it, and how difficult it was to leave there.

I was always someone who compared it to other places as well as someone who internalized what other people thought about it. Now when people honestly want to hear about it and find it interesting I can't say much good about it. Not that there isn't, just that I don't care to.

Ohio is cheap. Parks are great. Cities are small. People are nicer, real etc. Commutes are always under an hour, if not 30 minutes. So I don't know what my problem is. Well it isn't as exciting as a New York or a LA, and not as weird as a Portland or Seattle. Not as Black as Atlanta. So on and so forth.

Maybe a transplant has to learn to be content with their situation. Wherever it is. I'm sure I'd find things to complain about in other cities as well.
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Old 02-23-2018, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,503 posts, read 6,639,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Personally, I haven't lived anywhere where transplants didn't assimilate into the local culture; not a single place. I lived in North Carolina for a total of about 5 years (four different brief stays), and I'd definitely say I was assimilating to some degree. I lived in New York State for two years and was definitely assimilating. I think it's in my nature, though, as I grew up constantly moving around, so I think I carry a piece of every place I've lived on me, except Georgia. There is no Georgia within me, and I can't be more thankful lol...

My parents have lived in North Carolina for 13 years come April, and they are assimilated Carolinians; so is my older brother. I'm not sure when it happened, and all three still have some characteristics of their hometowns in them, but my family is assimilated Carolinians....

My mom has been in Georgia for three years in April, and by contrast, she isn't yet assimilated, so there's the other side of the coin...
Three years is not enough time. For me personally. But if she isn't trying to leave she's probably more than halfway there.
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Old 02-23-2018, 07:44 AM
 
Location: New York City
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I think for natives its all the "the grass is greener" mentality, everyone is always jealous of where someone else lives (until you start to travel and realize where you grew up might be pretty great).

Transplants definitely add a new positive energy to cities, Philadelphia is a great example. The "negadelphia" attitude was created by longtime natives, and its slowly disappearing because the city is quickly improving and newer residents are spreading the word.
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Mars City
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I guess we're talking about transplants, rather than transients (i.e. drifters, wanderers, hobos, etc).

I moved to an area that is completely off and wrong from my roots. As a transplant, I've certainly tried to fit in and make it work, with tons of effort over several years. In the end though, it's not working out. I'm looking forward to returning to where I'm from. It's been an interesting "experiment", but not worth anything else.

As to whether cities are better off with transplants and people needing to "assimilate" (compromise?), I'd vote no. Although areas can be enriched, and that's a very good thing, I'm seeing the personal negatives that go with it, and don't recommend it to others. For those who've made it work - which sounds like many - that's very good to hear. I guess I'm just too set it my ways, am older, and am too grounded in what I'm about and what works and 'clicks'.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 02-23-2018 at 09:20 AM..
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:15 AM
 
11,288 posts, read 23,308,782 times
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Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
Transients or transplants? Big difference.
Very true, I grew up in Iowa and moved to Chicago 17 years ago, I'm a transplant and have absolutely no plans on leaving the city, I love it. This is my home.

There are people at work and I've been friends with plenty of people over the years though who were definitely transients. They moved to Chicago, got what they wanted from it over a few years, and then bounced off to transient another place. They normally all speak of how much they miss the city and how much fun they had, but it's not in their blood to sit still too long.
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:21 AM
 
2,397 posts, read 1,974,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
Transplants tend to respect the cities they move to much more than natives.
Uh, not always. It really depends on the place and the transplants. To a lot of locals and natives, a mass influx of transplants trying to change the city that they already love and "make it better" when they see nothing wrong with the way it is or the way has always been is as disrespectful as it gets. And it's a valid point of view.

And of course, you always have a segment of transplants who move to a place that they really didn't want to for a job or family or something and they end up resenting it and being indignant about it. Or they move to a place that didn't turn out to be as great as they expected, and they end up hating it, bashing it, and can't wait to get out ASAP. You see posts like that here in City-Data about different cities and states every day.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
I’m a New Yorker who use to hate Transplants until I worked at a job in Manhattan where I was the only native and I realized transplants have More love for the city they move to and want to be part of it. Transplants in NYC love calling themselves New Yorkers as if they just received citizenship.
New York is such a HUGE exception, though. As you pointed out so well, when people move to NYC, they totally ingrain and immerse themselves in an already set, long established, and immensely popular and trendy local scene and culture that darn near everybody the world over respects or would love to be a part of; basically, you can't really change New York---New York changes YOU.

That's completely different from, a.) the average city that suddenly gets hot and gets a huge influx of transplants who completely change and overhaul the local culture to make it mirror or fit THEIR needs and desires to the point where it either ends up looking and feeling more and more like where many of the transplants moved from, or b.) it just becomes a generic, strip mall filled, trendy but soulless, "Anywhere, USA."

No way either a.) OR b.) happens to a place like NYC, no matter how many transplants move there. But it definitely happens to other much smaller, less established cities all the time once too many transplants start moving in.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
And I do believe transplants become native over time because I know some New Yorkers who moved to the city before 9/11. I also know some transplants who are older than me and were in NYC before I was born.

I don’t have a particular timeline but I do think you become a native by being part of the cities culture
I totally agree with this, and that's why I hate how some people act like if a person wasn't born and raised and didn't spend their ENTIRE life in a place, then they will NEVER be a "real" New Yorker, Texan, etc. Just doesn't make sense, and it's very condescending.

Last edited by Julio July; 02-23-2018 at 09:31 AM..
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