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Old 04-29-2020, 05:05 PM
 
42 posts, read 21,202 times
Reputation: 35

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulll View Post
I could see this coming, and figured I could help defuse this. I came upon this link, which is an interesting read.

Birmingham | Encyclopedia of Alabama

Birmingham calls itself "The Magic City" and "The Pittsburgh of the South". It's location is rich with mineral deposits. The city's steel mills became very important for the U.S. during WW2.
Thank You! How can someone just ignore that Birmingham was one of the nation's largest steel producers and very important to national manufacturing for several decades... and to be told that the only thing in this city's history that matters is the Civil Rights era... We all get sick of it! It's almost like we aren't ALLOWED to try to grow or move forward without someone constantly trying to shove what Bull Connor and co. did in the early 60's down our throats. There is this condescending attitude towards the whole thing... like we should be ashamed of where we are from. The vast majority of people who were involved in what happened then are now either dead or extremely old. I was born in 77' and lived in Bham my entire life. I can probably count on one hand how many racist incidents I've had in my life. Birmingham has been a majority-black city for at least 40 years and has had nothing but black mayors since 1979. This is in no way a "racist" city.
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Old 04-29-2020, 05:16 PM
 
6,880 posts, read 14,719,463 times
Reputation: 3265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
"Day to day" there's not a substantial difference between most places, but that's not saying anything. People have more or less the same sort of routine whether they live in Montgomery, Birmingham, Bristol, or Nashville. I don't think that's what we're really talking about though.



Agree....at the end of the day, Nashville is in a tier above the Ham. Not several tiers, but one tier.
However there aren't SUBSTANTIAL amenity differences and Birminhgam beach proximity, weather, and proximity to Atlanta/Hartsfield is a selling point along with much better urban bones, better prices, and no traffic. Literally no traffic!
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Old 04-29-2020, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
695 posts, read 209,787 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carter 1977 View Post
Thank You! How can someone just ignore that Birmingham was one of the nation's largest steel producers and very important to national manufacturing for several decades... and to be told that the only thing in this city's history that matters is the Civil Rights era... We all get sick of it! It's almost like we aren't ALLOWED to try to grow or move forward without someone constantly trying to shove what Bull Connor and co. did in the early 60's down our throats. There is this condescending attitude towards the whole thing... like we should be ashamed of where we are from.
I understand how you feel, I mentioned in another thread about de jure vs de facto segregation, but my opinion is neither here nor there, and I don't want to stir that up. I just wanted to post a link so everybody could read about it, and not go down a root of arguing. I know Birmingham does a Civil Rights Tour, has a Botanical Gardens and Zoo among other amenities. I can really respect and admire a city doing so much to 'catch up' (for lack of better word) and modernize like other cities.

I really don't think that Mutiny was trying to make you feel ashamed or anything like that though, "knowing" them from their posts on CD. Probably just wondering about Birmingham's history other than the Civil Rights Era. I'm guessing not too many people really know much about it other than it's history during the 1950s and 1960s.
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Old 04-29-2020, 06:58 PM
 
34,709 posts, read 32,076,623 times
Reputation: 22602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carter 1977 View Post
Thank You! How can someone just ignore that Birmingham was one of the nation's largest steel producers and very important to national manufacturing for several decades... and to be told that the only thing in this city's history that matters is the Civil Rights era... We all get sick of it! It's almost like we aren't ALLOWED to try to grow or move forward without someone constantly trying to shove what Bull Connor and co. did in the early 60's down our throats. There is this condescending attitude towards the whole thing... like we should be ashamed of where we are from. The vast majority of people who were involved in what happened then are now either dead or extremely old. I was born in 77' and lived in Bham my entire life. I can probably count on one hand how many racist incidents I've had in my life. Birmingham has been a majority-black city for at least 40 years and has had nothing but black mayors since 1979. This is in no way a "racist" city.
You are making a lot of assumptions based on my post. I never once said you should be ashamed of where you're from or that Birmingham is a racist city. For the record, I'm a Black guy from rural SC and not much younger than you. The town I was born in is primarily known for one thing historically which was a deadly event during the Civil Rights era so I'm not too far removed from you in this case. But if someone told me they liked my hometown's history, I'd give that person the biggest side eye and ask what they mean by that specifically. We can love the places we are from and still acknowledge the bad and the ugly that comes with that, and I most certainly won't be making any attempts to minimize or brush aside the severity of what we went through in this country as a people--and I'm glad Birmingham doesn't shy away from it because it needs to be told and never forgotten.
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Old 04-29-2020, 09:10 PM
 
349 posts, read 192,130 times
Reputation: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carter 1977 View Post
Thank You! How can someone just ignore that Birmingham was one of the nation's largest steel producers and very important to national manufacturing for several decades... and to be told that the only thing in this city's history that matters is the Civil Rights era... We all get sick of it! It's almost like we aren't ALLOWED to try to grow or move forward without someone constantly trying to shove what Bull Connor and co. did in the early 60's down our throats. There is this condescending attitude towards the whole thing... like we should be ashamed of where we are from. The vast majority of people who were involved in what happened then are now either dead or extremely old. I was born in 77' and lived in Bham my entire life. I can probably count on one hand how many racist incidents I've had in my life. Birmingham has been a majority-black city for at least 40 years and has had nothing but black mayors since 1979. This is in no way a "racist" city.
Well put! I would add that it seems that what is happening now after several decades of negative imagery and a condescending attitude towards the city having a newer bigger identity, Bham's perception is shifting in the national consciousness from sheer will and force of change. I see more national stories on UAB and groundbreaking medical research, UAB football doing the impossible, the Bham tech boom, foodie culture in the city, Birmingham as a destination for college graduates and the rebirth of Bham than I do the negativity of racism in Alabama, this was not the case a mere 10 years ago. Birmingham is well known as the epicenter of the Civil Rights movement and that proud history is central to the state, nation, and globe. More and more I'm seeing reference to the industrial history of the area which is substantial. There is more acknowledgement now that Birmingham is big enough to shoulder the histories of being the epicenter of the Civil Rights Movement and the iron city of the New South at the same time (That was not always the case either and has taken time to change). Birmingham and Pittsburgh iron and steel built this nation and even a cursory look at industrial history speaks loudly to that. Nashville is ahead by a tier due to population but that is it as far as I can tell, outside of pro sports amenities is not a substantial difference for retail, entertainment and food. As far as Southern cities in the Upland South area it really depends on what culture you prefer more than anything, country music entertainment of Nashville or Soulful artsy Birmingham
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Old 04-29-2020, 10:27 PM
 
42 posts, read 21,202 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by cherokee48 View Post
Well put! I would add that it seems that what is happening now after several decades of negative imagery and a condescending attitude towards the city having a newer bigger identity, Bham's perception is shifting in the national consciousness from sheer will and force of change. I see more national stories on UAB and groundbreaking medical research, UAB football doing the impossible, the Bham tech boom, foodie culture in the city, Birmingham as a destination for college graduates and the rebirth of Bham than I do the negativity of racism in Alabama, this was not the case a mere 10 years ago. Birmingham is well known as the epicenter of the Civil Rights movement and that proud history is central to the state, nation, and globe. More and more I'm seeing reference to the industrial history of the area which is substantial. There is more acknowledgement now that Birmingham is big enough to shoulder the histories of being the epicenter of the Civil Rights Movement and the iron city of the New South at the same time (That was not always the case either and has taken time to change). Birmingham and Pittsburgh iron and steel built this nation and even a cursory look at industrial history speaks loudly to that. Nashville is ahead by a tier due to population but that is it as far as I can tell, outside of pro sports amenities is not a substantial difference for retail, entertainment and food. As far as Southern cities in the Upland South area it really depends on what culture you prefer more than anything, country music entertainment of Nashville or Soulful artsy Birmingham
You may can tell I'm very much 1) a homer who is willing to put my city up against any city close to BHAM's size and 2) someone who gets defensive about my city. It does something to you when no matter how much education you have, people skills, etc.. people look down on you once they find out where you are from. I'm in Nashville quite alot. I have a son at Fisk and a first cousin at Vanderbilt. Besides from pro sports and Broadway/Grand Ole Opry, I don't see much difference between the two cities at all as far as amenities go. Both have similar upscale retail, entertainment districts, food, luxury hotels etc... One just has the benefit of having a much better reputation. Someone earlier in the thread said that Nashville is more known. I'd dispute that. Both cities have equal name recognition. Everyone in the country knows about both cities and where they are located. They are just known for different reasons.
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Old 04-30-2020, 01:06 AM
 
905 posts, read 1,716,964 times
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I think there are a few more amenities and scale that Nashville has that people are leaving out. Whether they are one tier or two tiers difference, I don't know. However, there is a big difference in some key amenities:

Airports:
BHM - 19 nonstop destination, all domestic. 3,090,604 passengers in 2019. Four airlines (regional and mainline counted as one) with scheduled passenger service.
BNA - 72 nonstop destinations including four (plus Montreal which is announced for the future) international destinations on 6 different airlines. 18,273,434 passengers in 2019. 17 airlines (regional and mainline counted as one) with scheduled passenger service.

There is a massive difference in the hospitality industry:
Birmingham: 13,770 hotel rooms listed as Birmingham plus surrounding counties
Nashville: 48,200 hotel rooms in the MSA (33,500 in Nashville and 14,700 in surrounding counties)
Gaylord Opryland Hotel is the largest non-gaming hotel in the US with 2880 rooms, and Nashville also has a higher level of luxury offerings with a Kimpton, JW Marriott, Thompson Hotel, the Hermitage Hotel, a whole host a half step below (Renaissance, Westin, Omni, etc), numerous national luxury boutique hotels (Fairlane, 21c, The Bobby, The Joseph, etc), and soon a new level of luxury with a W hotel, Conrad, and Four Seasons all under construction.

Economies:
Birmingham - Per capita income of $51k, 1 Fortune 500 company, $73 billion of Gross Metro Product
Nashville - Per capita income of $64k, 5 Fortune 500 companies, $157 billion of Gross Metro Product

Sports:
Birmingham: AAA baseball
Nashville: AAA baseball, MLS, NFL, NHL

Entertainment Districts:
There's not really a way to quantify this, but I have been to both and they aren't even close. There's nothing like Lower Broad in Birmingham.

I will readily admit that one thing B'ham has that Nashville does not is a relatively dense inner suburb like Homewood and to a lesser extent Mountain Brook. I absolutely love those areas in Birmingham and wish Nashville had something similar.
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Old 04-30-2020, 05:56 AM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
88 posts, read 26,737 times
Reputation: 181
Nashville also has the Gulch, Midtown, and Vanderbilt (which has no comparison in the South besides Duke, Emory, and maybe Tulane). These are the cosmopolitan areas of the city. For the soulful side, Nashville is more than just country with active gospel and R&B scenes. I also think people often forget that Nashville is home to three major HBCUs. Lastly, Nashville's government structure is completely different (some visionary local leadership over the last five decades). It's a combined city and county which gives it advantages to the fractured government in Birmingham and allows the Metro government to pool resources to respond to situations such as the current pandemic and tornadoes more effectively than without it.

With that said, I do appreciate Birmingham's forward-thinking mayor. He is definitely what the city needs to take itself to the next level. Nashville would benefit from a leader like him if there's one rising after Cooper.
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Old 04-30-2020, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Huntsville Area
1,952 posts, read 742,132 times
Reputation: 2998
This posting is so long that I don't have time to read it from end to end. But as a Nashville ex-pat living in Alabama, let me give you my biased and accurate description.

Nashville is a very centrally located place at the crossroads of three interstates. North, South, East, West and commerce is going through here. Birmingham's only location plus is that it's 2 hrs. from Atlanta--another big crossroad of commerce.

Population: in the 1950's Birmingham had a population of 497K people versus Nashville's 164K. But Nashville is now a megapolis going from Bowling Green all the way to Huntsville. Many say the region is 2.9 million people--twice or more that o Birmingham and its immediate vicinity.

Nashville's economy is changing fast, with some 250K people working in healthcare. Right now, there are some 25 huge overhead cranes working on $ billions in construction just in the downtown area alone. Other than B'ham rebuilding their downtown Interstate bridges, the city's building is a small percentage of Nashville area's. Birmingham has historically had heavy industry and the insurance industry, but that's changing too.

Nashville is a city radiating out in all directions. Birmingham is a city in an East-West valley with a couple of parallel valleys to the south. Those mountains are not only physical barriers, they are social barriers. The city folks remain in Birmingham while the movers, shakers and business barons retire to some of the premier residential communities in the U.S. like Mountain Brook and Shoal Creek. There again, Nashville's Belle Meade and Williamson County are premier luxury communities too.

Birmingham's affluent people hang out in coffee bars out on Hwy 280 South. Nashville's not quite so social and many citizens are more blue collar and now foreigners.

Nashville has had such an influx of people from all over the world diving housing prices are simply out of sight. And few of these people really make enough money to live in the city. Diversity changed entire portions of the city, and native Nashvillians have moved to surrounding counties or they've moved to Yuppie communities within the city with reconditioned old homes.

This is getting long and I have to stop. Nashville is a much nicer place to live, but it's the outlying communities that really are thiving. Birmingham just doesn't have the fast paced and nice environment of Middle Tennessee although I hear Birmingham has improved under their current mayor's leadership.

Last edited by JMT; 04-30-2020 at 08:15 AM.. Reason: Removed off-topic comments.
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Old 04-30-2020, 07:57 AM
 
34,709 posts, read 32,076,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norcal2k19 View Post
With that said, I do appreciate Birmingham's forward-thinking mayor. He is definitely what the city needs to take itself to the next level. Nashville would benefit from a leader like him if there's one rising after Cooper.
Woodfin (my fraternity brother) is definitely an asset who is taking the city in the right direction. I wish him well.
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