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Old 04-08-2019, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
931 posts, read 1,623,827 times
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The red line is the busiest line of the MBTA, WMATA and CTA rapid transit systems. Which red line has the most congestion? Which red line runs the longest trains? Which red line operates with the highest off-peak frequency? Which red line operates with the highest peak frequency? Which is your favorite?

Last edited by bballniket; 04-08-2019 at 03:48 AM.. Reason: fix typo
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Old 04-08-2019, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
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The MBTA red line seems to have some type of major issue during rush hour once a week at least.
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Old 04-08-2019, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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I'd say DC, then Chicago, then Boston.

DC's Red Line never passes through any rough stretches and the trains operate the fastest, and is by far the cleanest, with climate-controlled stations. It used to be a bit shady from Takoma down through Rhode Island Avenue, but overall, it's solid middle-class development on the east side of the line, and then it passes through the heart of downtown DC, then turns through the upscale northwest neighborhoods and through most of the major business centers of that side of Montgomery County. It has the best peak frequency and is on par with the other two systems off-peak. Unlike many other lines, you get to see a decent chunk of the city on the east side, as it doesn't go underground until just before Union Station, meaning that almost all of the NoMa development is visible, and this continues up through Silver Spring. It's biggest weaknesses are the lack of 24/7 service and given WMATA's fares based on distance, quite expensive.

Chicago's Red Line south of Cermak (and especially 35th, where the White Sox play) passes through some sad neighborhoods that's very unlike what's found north of there, and it still baffles me from those anti-transit measures since its a safe line despite passing through the city's nicest neighborhoods north of the Loop. If the southern portion of the line swapped places with where the green line runs on the south side, I'd rank it above DC. It does win points for being the only 24/7 line out of these.

Boston also serves a good purpose for most of its route, though I feel that compared to DC's reach deep into the suburbs on both ends, doesn't quite make out in terms of coverage. It is very useful though heading from the universities in Cambridge, through Beacon Hill, downtown, the seaport district, Southie, and then the south shore, but it misses out on passing through the most exciting part of Boston's core: the North End and Back Bay. It also tends to have the smallest cars, runs the slowest, and the least frequency.
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Old 04-08-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: East Boston, MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post

Boston also serves a good purpose for most of its route, though I feel that compared to DC's reach deep into the suburbs on both ends, doesn't quite make out in terms of coverage. It is very useful though heading from the universities in Cambridge, through Beacon Hill, downtown, the seaport district, Southie, and then the south shore, but it misses out on passing through the most exciting part of Boston's core: the North End and Back Bay. It also tends to have the smallest cars, runs the slowest, and the least frequency.
No, you have this backwards. It has the largest cars, runs the fastest, and has the best frequencies in the network. Boston is also different from DC in that the subway doesn't extend deep into the 'burbs because it it's not serving dual purposes like Metro in DC which doubles as both a subway network and commuter rail (Boston has a vast, separate commuter rail network quite a bit larger than MARC).

I ride the Red Line every day between Davis and Park. It has its issues, but I'd prefer it over Green and Orange any day of the week. Having lived in Kensington, MD and ridden the Red Line in that area for a long time, I'd agree that the DC Red Line (and Metro Network as a whole) is better than the MBTA. Same for Chicago. I'd rank Boston's 3rd on this list.
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:03 PM
 
11,167 posts, read 11,036,384 times
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Ranking individual lines is pretty academic and not very informative. Lines largely aren’t that useful unless they are part of a larger network so it’s pretty hard to seperate them from they system as a whole IMO.


Like for example if they were to build the REd-Blue Connectir it would impact the Orlando line as much as the Red Line.
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Old 04-08-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
I'd say DC, then Chicago, then Boston.

DC's Red Line never passes through any rough stretches and the trains operate the fastest, and is by far the cleanest, with climate-controlled stations. It used to be a bit shady from Takoma down through Rhode Island Avenue, but overall, it's solid middle-class development on the east side of the line, and then it passes through the heart of downtown DC, then turns through the upscale northwest neighborhoods and through most of the major business centers of that side of Montgomery County. It has the best peak frequency and is on par with the other two systems off-peak. Unlike many other lines, you get to see a decent chunk of the city on the east side, as it doesn't go underground until just before Union Station, meaning that almost all of the NoMa development is visible, and this continues up through Silver Spring. It's biggest weaknesses are the lack of 24/7 service and given WMATA's fares based on distance, quite expensive.

Chicago's Red Line south of Cermak (and especially 35th, where the White Sox play) passes through some sad neighborhoods that's very unlike what's found north of there, and it still baffles me from those anti-transit measures since its a safe line despite passing through the city's nicest neighborhoods north of the Loop. If the southern portion of the line swapped places with where the green line runs on the south side, I'd rank it above DC. It does win points for being the only 24/7 line out of these.

Boston also serves a good purpose for most of its route, though I feel that compared to DC's reach deep into the suburbs on both ends, doesn't quite make out in terms of coverage. It is very useful though heading from the universities in Cambridge, through Beacon Hill, downtown, the seaport district, Southie, and then the south shore, but it misses out on passing through the most exciting part of Boston's core: the North End and Back Bay. It also tends to have the smallest cars, runs the slowest, and the least frequency.
Which red line's trains would you say are the most crowded?
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Old 04-08-2019, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Average weekday ridership for the Red Line in Chicago in 2017 was 225,686. Total rides for the year 2017 was just over 73 million. The Red Line for MBTA is 244K average weekday ridership, at least for December 2017.

Last edited by marothisu; 04-08-2019 at 07:16 PM..
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Old 04-08-2019, 07:16 PM
 
3,637 posts, read 3,540,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post

Boston also serves a good purpose for most of its route, though I feel that compared to DC's reach deep into the suburbs on both ends, doesn't quite make out in terms of coverage. It is very useful though heading from the universities in Cambridge, through Beacon Hill, downtown, the seaport district, Southie, and then the south shore, but it misses out on passing through the most exciting part of Boston's core: the North End and Back Bay. It also tends to have the smallest cars, runs the slowest, and the least frequency.
Actually Chicago's CTA has the smallest cars, by far, because its 19th Century system was designed with very tight turning radii necessitating shorter cars (only 48-feet long IIRC). Also the Chicago Red Line is the slowest, at least the far north side with its high-frequency of stops, in some cases every few blocks.
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Old 04-08-2019, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProf View Post
Actually Chicago's CTA has the smallest cars, by far, because its 19th Century system was designed with very tight turning radii necessitating shorter cars (only 48-feet long IIRC). Also the Chicago Red Line is the slowest, at least the far north side with its high-frequency of stops, in some cases every few blocks.
Luckily the entire Red Line track of Chicago was replaced a handful of years ago and got much, much faster especially when they delivered brand new cars to the system and also got new signaling systems. World of difference compared to when I had moved to Chicago and none of this was the case.

The Chicago cars are not huge, but to say they're "by far" the smallest cars is just inaccurate. Chicago's cars are 9 feet 4 inches wide while Boston's are 9 feet 6 inches (at least to my knowledge). DC's are just under 10 feet 2 inches wide. On the other hand, the MTA cars in NYC are under 9 feet wide, meaning they're even smaller than Chicago's.

One reason why Chicago's old rolling stock felt smaller than it really was is because of the seating configuration. The old seating configuration had everything facing forward/backwards (http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/pic...5-04%20014.JPG). The new cars took a more NYC approach with most seats facing to the sides while only a few faced to the front/back (http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/cta-...ar%20seats.jpg)

Last edited by marothisu; 04-08-2019 at 07:35 PM..
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Old 04-10-2019, 09:53 PM
 
2,012 posts, read 863,821 times
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Bostons getting new cars anyway, on every line except blue.
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