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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 44 39.64%
Wilmington (Delaware) 16 14.41%
Washington, D.C. 8 7.21%
Norfolk 6 5.41%
Richmond 10 9.01%
Pittsburgh 11 9.91%
Boston 2 1.80%
Other 14 12.61%
Voters: 111. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-06-2021, 05:40 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,759 posts, read 7,241,748 times
Reputation: 4368

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoHyping View Post
Exactly, by stats alone tell us this. Philly has links say 60% and some 70% as rowhomes and that does not include the twins/duplex half-doubles which are not considered rows. Baltimore also is up there at least 60%.

Only if I had to pick a Midwestern city most like a East Coast city and especially a Philly/Baltimore would I pick St Louis.

From what I have seen and perceived. Baltimore does not have the very narrow alley-sized streets as so many of those sub-divided blocks common in Philly back-in-a-day were split and alleys eliminated. Baltimore seems to have far more alleys intact with backyards.

But in styles of rows ..... just way more similar and alike even then not.

Gentrified block in Baltimore of the taller rows that yes..... Philly has too. 4-floor ones were probably more high-end when built too. ALL JUST RANDOM STREETVIEWS I CLICKED ON.....

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3076...7i16384!8i8192

Its alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3076...7i16384!8i8192


https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3078...7i16384!8i8192

Its Alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3077...7i16384!8i8192


https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3082...7i16384!8i8192

Its alleyway
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3080...7i16384!8i8192


Other tall rows...
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3022...7i16384!8i8192

Its alley is still there .... just all around it are new rows/townhouses and streetview does not go down the actual alley here. Still I zoomed in on it

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3010...7i16384!8i8192

Other nice rows that were saved and with Victorian Gilded-Age features

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3163...7i16384!8i8192

You also have the Green porchy rows

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3171...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.3159...7i16384!8i8192

There are alleys also all over Baltimore like Chicago (though not a rowhome city in any sense as Philly/Baltimore. Chicago has the most alleys as the much larger city of course and 90% of the city is. But just as Chicago .... Streetview goes down Baltimore Alleys also...

Really, I do not know why someone says Philly has more Porch rows?? Both have them depending on the era/decade they were built. Just by far and I mean by far.... Philly has those super-narrow streets with rows. Alley-sized and due to their era streets were sub-divided further to get more mass-built rows in and alleys totally eliminated. Seem Baltimore has FAR MORE ALLEYS intact like Chicago behind its row blocks also.

Size of the city has little to do with its majority of blocks and how they compare with another city. St Louis again may be the most Eastern looking Midwest city. But still not the scale or % of the city is rows..... as both Philly and Baltimore.....
Baltimore has quite a few narrow residential streets.

Fells Point
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2887...7i16384!8i8192

Federal Hill
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2794...7i16384!8i8192

Pigtown
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2825...7i13312!8i6656


In some neighborhoods, it really gets weird because There could be an alley running beside a house on one side, while the other side of the house is the backyard of another block of houses.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2865...7i16384!8i8192

notice that there is no alley access to the house on the right, but the house on the left has the alley running beside it.
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Old 02-06-2021, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
7,776 posts, read 5,809,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
Like several other posters, I would also say St. Louis
It is interesting how much the Mid Atlantic influenced cities as far as Louisville, St. Louis, and Cincinnati in terms of building styles. Findlay Market and OTR could be dropped in Baltimore or Richmond and blend right in.
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Old 02-07-2021, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,328 posts, read 4,079,625 times
Reputation: 5411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
Louisville should also have been considered in this poll. Like Maryland, Kentucky was also one of those slave/segregationist states that didn't officially secede, but also had divided loyalties. Similar Catholic/Methodist/Baptist mix, and Louisville has a decent Jewish minority as well. The skyline sizes are very similar, and Baltimore could of had a downtown freeway along the waterfront like Louisville does.
But aren't you glad they didn't extend I-83 southward? I imagine the Baltimoreans are thrilled, especially given what got built instead.

Quote:
Louisville isn't as big as Baltimore, but had a decent industrial component to its economy, which still persists today in the form of Ford plants and GE appliances, I still feel that Baltimore/Maryland is less southern overall than Louisville/Kentucky. But not by all that much quite frankly, as Baltimore's demographics more closely resemble Louisville's than Philadelphia's. And of course, Baltimore and Louisville have another thing in common: Triple Crown Thoroughbred horse races. "Maryland, My Maryland" is still sung at the Preakness (Though not the first and last verses which contain the most pro-Southern lyrics). Yet Louisville is literally right across the river from the North (Indiana). 25 miles separate Baltimore's northern limits from Pennsylvania.

To conclude, if you meshed Wilmington, St. Louis, Louisville, Richmond, and Hampton Roads together, you get Baltimore.
1) I'm not sure whether or not to class this as ironic, but I think it might be, given our recent stance on Chinese trade policy: Appliance Park, the huge GE appliance manufacturing facility outside Louisville, came back from the dead after GE sold its appliance division to Haier, ISTR. (Haier uses the GE logo and trademark under license

2) Thanks for schooling me; I didn't know any of the verses of "Maryland, My Maryland" were still sung! (I think it's in the third verse of the song that you find the couplet "Avenge the patriotic gore / that filled the streets of Baltimore", referring to Union troops marching through the city.)

Maryland and Missouri saw Civil War battles fought on their soil; AFAIK, Kentucky did not. I don't know if Maryland observed Lincoln's Birthday as a holiday in the days before Presidents' Day was created, but Missouri did, and the "Welcome to Kentucky" signs that greet you upon entering the state have signs beneath them reading "Birthplace of Abraham Lincoln." I can't imagine they didn't celebrate Lincoln's Birthday there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Any and every characteristic that Baltimore has is southern no matter what it is. Southern cities are not monolithical.
Heavy industry is not, repeat not, a characteristic common to Southern cities. Find me any Southern urbanscape that looks like I-95 passing through Baltimore, or a steel mill like Sparrows Point anywhere other than Birmingham. St. Louis has chemical plants, or had, along one stretch of the Mississippi, and there's that huge beer brewery too. (Edited to add: The string of chemical plants that line the Mississippi upriver from New Orleans are largely mid-20th-century phenomena; Baltimore's industrial heritage stretches back farther than that — and besides, the plants aren't in New Orleans.)
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Old 02-07-2021, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
95 posts, read 39,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post

Heavy industry is not, repeat not, a characteristic common to Southern cities. Find me any Southern urbanscape that looks like I-95 passing through Baltimore, or a steel mill like Sparrows Point anywhere other than Birmingham. St. Louis has chemical plants, or had, along one stretch of the Mississippi, and there's that huge beer brewery too. (Edited to add: The string of chemical plants that line the Mississippi upriver from New Orleans are largely mid-20th-century phenomena; Baltimore's industrial heritage stretches back farther than that — and besides, the plants aren't in New Orleans.)
Umm...Richmond, Charleston, Savannah have some legacy industry. Baltimore could very well be considered a southern town, more southern cultural than DC for sure other than the local black population there.

I agree with KodeBlue
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Old 02-07-2021, 08:51 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,867 posts, read 4,566,875 times
Reputation: 3742
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW4me View Post
I don't know who in the census bureau designated those regional lines,
or when (presumably a long long time ago), or who had their ears.
But it's safe to say the decision would've been made at bureau HQ in DC.
And had they grouped MD & DC with their northeastern neighbors,
that would've meant splitting the DC metro area in two, because
the VA suburbs would've remained in the southern region.
Probably those decision-makers didn't want to divide their own
metro area. Absent more info, that's a hypothesis.
This is exactly what's done with other federal agencies actually. Washington is made "HQ", while Maryland Northward to Maine is one region, and Virginia Southward to Florida is an entirely different region.
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Old 02-08-2021, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,328 posts, read 4,079,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
This is exactly what's done with other federal agencies actually. Washington is made "HQ", while Maryland Northward to Maine is one region, and Virginia Southward to Florida is an entirely different region.
Once again, the Mason-Dixon Line has historically served as a figurative dividing line between North and South.

That's the Maryland-Pennsylvania border.

The Battle of Gettysburg is considered the only major Civil War battle to have been fought in the North for this reason.
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Old 02-08-2021, 12:44 AM
 
34,782 posts, read 32,198,741 times
Reputation: 22701
All cities being discussed that have an Edgar Allen Poe House/Museum, raise your hand.
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Old 02-08-2021, 01:00 AM
 
34,782 posts, read 32,198,741 times
Reputation: 22701
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Any and every characteristic that Baltimore has is southern no matter what it is. Southern cities are not monolithical.
It doesn't work like that. New Orleans is Southern but also has many characteristics that are unique unto itself/south Louisiana.

Historically Southern cities were flat-out anomalies and were regarded as being not really Southern. The culture that largely defined the South for most of history was rural Southern culture because that's where the region's wealth was concentrated and the power base was located. The few cities it did have were dotted along its periphery and tolerated as necessary nuisances for importing/exporting; any self-respecting Southerner knew that if they just had to venture into Baltimore or Richmond or New Orleans or Louisville that they needed to get their business done as quickly as possible and go back home to the true South.
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Old 02-08-2021, 01:06 AM
 
34,782 posts, read 32,198,741 times
Reputation: 22701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jupiter1162 View Post
Umm...Richmond, Charleston, Savannah have some legacy industry. Baltimore could very well be considered a southern town, more southern cultural than DC for sure other than the local black population there.

I agree with KodeBlue
Richmond, sure. Charleston and Savannah, not a whole lot actually. That's why they languished so long after the Civil War when the South's economic base shifted towards the interior/Piedmont whereas Richmond was actually able to get its economy back up and running fairly quickly and transitioned to other industries in the years following.
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Old 02-08-2021, 02:30 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,759 posts, read 7,241,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It doesn't work like that. New Orleans is Southern but also has many characteristics that are unique unto itself/south Louisiana.

Historically Southern cities were flat-out anomalies and were regarded as being not really Southern. The culture that largely defined the South for most of history was rural Southern culture because that's where the region's wealth was concentrated and the power base was located. The few cities it did have were dotted along its periphery and tolerated as necessary nuisances for importing/exporting; any self-respecting Southerner knew that if they just had to venture into Baltimore or Richmond or New Orleans or Louisville that they needed to get their business done as quickly as possible and go back home to the true South.
I get what you're saying, but what I'm saying, southern states have those characteristics as well. Anything that people are using to make Baltimore not southern can be said as, "Baltimore has/does that too, but that just means that (insert whatever) is just something that the south has/does as well." The south may have been mostly rural, but the south also had urban industrial cities as well. That shouldn't be a knock on Baltimore's southerness.
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