U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 46 39.66%
Wilmington (Delaware) 18 15.52%
Washington, D.C. 8 6.90%
Norfolk 6 5.17%
Richmond 10 8.62%
Pittsburgh 11 9.48%
Boston 2 1.72%
Other 15 12.93%
Voters: 116. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-08-2021, 12:26 PM
 
Location: NJ (Prv. SYR, BOS, NYC, GSO, MCO)
4,854 posts, read 1,739,599 times
Reputation: 3973

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Well, first off people in DC don't walk around talking or thinking about being connected to the NE. Because DC already IS connected, and more of a NEC epicenter than Boston, which is rarely talked about in the DMV. So you're right about the DC-Boston ends of it. But whether if it's by rail ridership or revenue, Boston is the fourth most connected city out of the "Northeast Big 4".

Top city pairs by ridership, 2019:

1. New York, NY - Washington, DC 226 mi
2. New York, NY - Philadelphia, PA 91 mi
3. Philadelphia, PA - Washington, DC 135 mi
4. Boston, MA - New York, NY 231 mi
5. Baltimore, MD - New York, NY 185 mi
6. BWI Airport, MD - New York, NY 196 mi
7. Back Bay, MA - New York, NY 230 mi
8. New York, NY - Wilmington, DE 116 mi
9. New York, NY - Providence, RI 188 mi
10. Baltimore, MD - Washington, DC 41 mi

Top city pairs by revenue, 2019:

1. New York, NY - Washington, DC 226 mi
2. New York, NY - Philadelphia, PA 91 mi
3. Boston, MA - New York, NY 231 mi
4. Philadelphia, PA - Washington, DC 135 mi
5. Baltimore, MD - New York, NY 185 mi
6. BWI Airport, MD - New York, NY 196 mi
7. Back Bay, MA - New York, NY 230 mi
8. New York, NY - Wilmington, DE 116 mi
9. New York, NY - Providence, RI 188 mi
10. Newark, NJ - Washington, DC 216 mi

https://www.railpassengers.org/tools...ip-statistics/
Well yeah that's rail. Look at the aviation stats. Boston's further away so mor people fly. Which is why DCA-BOS is so well travelled.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-08-2021, 12:28 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,942 posts, read 4,604,696 times
Reputation: 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
This makes perfect sense. Advances in transportation in the postwar era have probably reoriented no other metropolitan region as much as it has DC/Baltimore. Although it's less obvious in more established big cities like NYC, Philly, and Boston, the fact is that transportation, development, and migration patterns have been giving the country more of a megaregional feel fore the past several decades; shifts in state-level voting patterns since 2008 have been the most vivid example of this.
It doesn't make sense on paper, but may in local culture of each city. DC is more connected to NYC/Philly and has higher transit commuter share between those cities. Even Baltimore has high transit connectivity to the others. Boston is all the way at the other end of the Megalopolis, and while still heavily connected to the rest of the corridor, DC/Baltimore has a significant amount more. This will only increase with the planned infrastructure coming in the next decade or two.

But culturally speaking DC/Balt is the clear outlier of the NEC.

Last edited by the resident09; 02-08-2021 at 12:38 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2021, 12:31 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,942 posts, read 4,604,696 times
Reputation: 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Well yeah that's rail. Look at the aviation stats. Boston's further away so mor people fly. Which is why DCA-BOS is so well travelled.
Would be intersting (in a separate thread) to view each of the connections juxtaposed to one another city by city, rail, bus, air, etc. Just to get a sense of how connected things are, even with other cities like Pittsburgh, Albany, and smaller EC cities just to have a clearer picture.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2021, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,746 posts, read 17,255,078 times
Reputation: 6161
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
So that makes three.

The third one is in Philadelphia.
Could you make it 4 and count his dorm room at the University of Virginia?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2021, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,903 posts, read 2,810,794 times
Reputation: 6736
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Well, first off people in DC don't walk around talking or thinking about being connected to the NE. Because DC already IS connected, and more of a NEC epicenter than Boston, which is rarely talked about in the DMV. So you're right about the DC-Boston ends of it. But whether if it's by rail ridership or revenue, Boston is the fourth most connected city out of the "Northeast Big 4".

Top city pairs by ridership, 2019:

1. New York, NY - Washington, DC 226 mi
2. New York, NY - Philadelphia, PA 91 mi
3. Philadelphia, PA - Washington, DC 135 mi
4. Boston, MA - New York, NY 231 mi
5. Baltimore, MD - New York, NY 185 mi
6. BWI Airport, MD - New York, NY 196 mi
7. Back Bay, MA - New York, NY 230 mi
8. New York, NY - Wilmington, DE 116 mi
9. New York, NY - Providence, RI 188 mi
10. Baltimore, MD - Washington, DC 41 mi

Top city pairs by revenue, 2019:

1. New York, NY - Washington, DC 226 mi
2. New York, NY - Philadelphia, PA 91 mi
3. Boston, MA - New York, NY 231 mi
4. Philadelphia, PA - Washington, DC 135 mi
5. Baltimore, MD - New York, NY 185 mi
6. BWI Airport, MD - New York, NY 196 mi
7. Back Bay, MA - New York, NY 230 mi
8. New York, NY - Wilmington, DE 116 mi
9. New York, NY - Providence, RI 188 mi
10. Newark, NJ - Washington, DC 216 mi

https://www.railpassengers.org/tools...ip-statistics/
These statistics mean nothing. It is not the point I was making. I can fly from Chicago to the east coast in a couple of hours. The point is, like I mentioned previously, outside of rail lines, the Bos-Wash corridor is more of a macro-level phenomenon than something tangible than an individual can grasp.

In the real world (outside of C-D), outside of Acela service, I have never heard anyone talk about the Bos-Wash region. It is a macro-level region from the standpoint of rail/commuter service, but it's not a real "region" that can be appreciated in a tangible sense.

And even on this site, I rarely hear anyone from NYC, Boston, or Philly mention the region. You are the only poster who frequently mentions it to as a way to connect DC to the Northeast, when questions about whether DC/Baltimore are Southern are brought up.

In real life, nobody talks about it as a physical region, and on this site, nobody from NYC, Boston, or Philly mention it much.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2021, 05:19 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,942 posts, read 4,604,696 times
Reputation: 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
These statistics mean nothing. It is not the point I was making. I can fly from Chicago to the east coast in a couple of hours. The point is, like I mentioned previously, outside of rail lines, the Bos-Wash corridor is more of a macro-level phenomenon than something tangible than an individual can grasp.

In the real world (outside of C-D), outside of Acela service, I have never heard anyone talk about the Bos-Wash region. It is a macro-level region from the standpoint of rail/commuter service, but it's not a real "region" that can be appreciated in a tangible sense.

And even on this site, I rarely hear anyone from NYC, Boston, or Philly mention the region. You are the only poster who frequently mentions it to as a way to connect DC to the Northeast, when questions about whether DC/Baltimore are Southern are brought up.

In real life, nobody talks about it as a physical region, and on this site, nobody from NYC, Boston, or Philly mention it much.
The regions (or sub regions) on the East Coast are New England, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic.

I don't know of anyone calling the Northeast Corridor a region. It's a megalopolis of closely connected cities spanning two regions at least. The transit connections between these cities reflect a human interactivity point, not a cultural one. Most people in real life or off this site, simply use the term "East Coast" to describe the Northeast Corridor cities from DC up to Boston. It's not some big deal to people.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2021, 06:03 PM
 
482 posts, read 153,719 times
Reputation: 783
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
The regions (or sub regions) on the East Coast are New England, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic.

I don't know of anyone calling the Northeast Corridor a region. It's a megalopolis of closely connected cities spanning two regions at least. The transit connections between these cities reflect a human interactivity point, not a cultural one. Most people in real life or off this site, simply use the term "East Coast" to describe the Northeast Corridor cities from DC up to Boston. It's not some big deal to people.
Yeah I think you both are right. I agree with personone that “Bos-Wash corridor” is not really a region/term that you ever hear about outside of Acela, but I think that you are right too; “East Coast” is typically the term that is referring to the Bosh-Wash corridor.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2021, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,903 posts, read 2,810,794 times
Reputation: 6736
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sportsfan View Post
Yeah I think you both are right. I agree with personone that “Bos-Wash corridor” is not really a region/term that you ever hear about outside of Acela, but I think that you are right too; “East Coast” is typically the term that is referring to the Bosh-Wash corridor.
I can agree with this. "East Coast" is used many times to refer to the Bos-Wash corridor, as opposed to Maine-Florida. However, "Northeast," which is a subregion of East Coast, ALWAYS refers to Philly to Boston (and places in between). It does not always include Baltimore/DC, which are culturally distinct from the true Northeast; particularly in their black populations, which have some Southern culture/influence.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2021, 06:14 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,942 posts, read 4,604,696 times
Reputation: 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
I can agree with this. "East Coast" is used many times to refer to the Bos-Wash corridor, as opposed to Maine-Florida. However, "Northeast," which is a subregion of East Coast, ALWAYS refers to Philly to Boston (and places in between). It does not always include Baltimore/DC, which are culturally distinct from the true Northeast; particularly in their black populations, which have some Southern culture/influence.
You're conflicting the Northeast Region Census definition, with the Northeast Corridor Amtrak rail. The Northeast Corridor rail connection doesn't just end at Philly. It continues on because there's 10 million people in the bordering DC-Baltimore region to it's southwest. Northeast Region by Census is made up of New England and the Mid-Atlantic. Maryland and DC are in the Mid-Atlantic (which are a mix of north and south culturally) and most commonly referred to as that. Therefore by association many organizations lump the two together when describing location.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northe..._United_States

Feeling like a broken record here, but as stated "East Coast" is probably the most commonly used term for any stretch of the BosWash megalopolis.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2021, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,903 posts, read 2,810,794 times
Reputation: 6736
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
You're conflicting the Northeast Region Census definition, with the Northeast Corridor Amtrak rail. The Northeast Corridor rail connection doesn't just end at Philly. It continues on because there's 10 million people in the bordering DC-Baltimore region to it's southwest. Northeast Region by Census is made up of New England and the Mid-Atlantic. Maryland and DC are in the Mid-Atlantic (which are a mix of north and south culturally) and most commonly referred to as that. Therefore by association many organizations lump the two together when describing location.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northe..._United_States

Feeling like a broken record here, but as stated "East Coast" is probably the most commonly used term for any stretch of the BosWash megalopolis.
Re-read what I wrote. I specifically said, "East Coast" is commonly meant to refer to BosWash....not sure why you keep repeating this.

I just said that "North East" doesn't ALWAYS include Baltimore/DC. In other words "North East" doesn't always equal "East Coast."

The "MidAtlantic" definition in the Census does NOT include Maryland/DC. See below.

From your own link that you posted:
"Using the Census Bureau's definition of the Northeast, the region includes nine states: they are Maine, New York, New Jersey, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania.[1][a] The region is often subdivided into New England (the six states east of New York State) and the Mid-Atlantic states (New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). This definition has been essentially unchanged since 1880 and is widely used as a standard for data tabulation"

The Census Northeast definition (and Mid Atlantic definition) does NOT include Maryland or DC.

They are also considered part of the Southeastern US sometimes, hence, I feel like a broken record saying that Maryland and DC are not ALWAYS included in the definition of "North East."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southe..._United_States

Last edited by personone; 02-09-2021 at 08:07 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top