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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 47 38.52%
Wilmington (Delaware) 19 15.57%
Washington, D.C. 9 7.38%
Norfolk 6 4.92%
Richmond 11 9.02%
Pittsburgh 11 9.02%
Boston 3 2.46%
Other 16 13.11%
Voters: 122. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-09-2021, 08:09 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,942 posts, read 4,618,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
You're conflicting the Northeast Region Census definition, with the Northeast Corridor Amtrak rail. The Northeast Corridor rail connection doesn't just end at Philly. It continues on because there's 10 million people in the bordering DC-Baltimore region to it's southwest. Northeast Region by Census is made up of New England and the Mid-Atlantic. Maryland and DC are in the Mid-Atlantic (which are a mix of north and south culturally) and most commonly referred to as that. Therefore by association many organizations lump the two together when describing location.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northe..._United_States

Feeling like a broken record here, but as stated "East Coast" is probably the most commonly used term for any stretch of the BosWash megalopolis.
Well the point is it's ambiguous to some, and depends on the agency. If you read the entire link and not just the first portion of that paragraph it also says:

"however, the Census Bureau has acknowledged the obvious limitations of this definition[13] and the potential merits of a proposal created after the 1950 census that would include changing regional boundaries to include Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia, with the Mid-Atlantic states,"

"Similarly, the Geological Society of America defines the Northeast as these same states but with the addition of Maryland and the District of Columbia.[20] The narrowest definitions include only the states of New England.[21] Other more restrictive definitions include New England and New York as part of the Northeast United States, but exclude Pennsylvania and New Jersey."

I just don't see why this is being brought up every thread, especially when this one isn't a North/South thread.
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Old 02-09-2021, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,926 posts, read 2,827,608 times
Reputation: 6776
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Re-read what I wrote. I specifically said, "East Coast" is commonly meant to refer to BosWash....not sure why you keep repeating this.

I just said that "North East" doesn't ALWAYS include Baltimore/DC. In other words "North East" doesn't always equal "East Coast."

The "MidAtlantic" definition in the Census does NOT include Maryland/DC. See below.

From your own link that you posted:
"Using the Census Bureau's definition of the Northeast, the region includes nine states: they are Maine, New York, New Jersey, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania.[1][a] The region is often subdivided into New England (the six states east of New York State) and the Mid-Atlantic states (New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). This definition has been essentially unchanged since 1880 and is widely used as a standard for data tabulation"

The Census Northeast definition (and Mid Atlantic definition) does NOT include Maryland or DC.

They are also considered part of the Southeastern US sometimes, hence, I feel like a broken record saying that Maryland and DC are not ALWAYS included in the definition of "North East."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southe..._United_States
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Well the point is it's ambiguous to some, and depends on the agency. If you read the entire link and not just the first portion of that paragraph it also says:

"however, the Census Bureau has acknowledged the obvious limitations of this definition[13] and the potential merits of a proposal created after the 1950 census that would include changing regional boundaries to include Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia, with the Mid-Atlantic states,"

"Similarly, the Geological Society of America defines the Northeast as these same states but with the addition of Maryland and the District of Columbia.[20] The narrowest definitions include only the states of New England.[21] Other more restrictive definitions include New England and New York as part of the Northeast United States, but exclude Pennsylvania and New Jersey."

I just don't see why this is being brought up every thread, especially when this one isn't a North/South thread.
Fair enough.
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Old 02-09-2021, 10:37 AM
 
489 posts, read 156,999 times
Reputation: 798
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Re-read what I wrote. I specifically said, "East Coast" is commonly meant to refer to BosWash....not sure why you keep repeating this.

I just said that "North East" doesn't ALWAYS include Baltimore/DC. In other words "North East" doesn't always equal "East Coast."

The "MidAtlantic" definition in the Census does NOT include Maryland/DC. See below.

From your own link that you posted:
"Using the Census Bureau's definition of the Northeast, the region includes nine states: they are Maine, New York, New Jersey, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania.[1][a] The region is often subdivided into New England (the six states east of New York State) and the Mid-Atlantic states (New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). This definition has been essentially unchanged since 1880 and is widely used as a standard for data tabulation"

The Census Northeast definition (and Mid Atlantic definition) does NOT include Maryland or DC.

They are also considered part of the Southeastern US sometimes, hence, I feel like a broken record saying that Maryland and DC are not ALWAYS included in the definition of "North East."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southe..._United_States
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Well the point is it's ambiguous to some, and depends on the agency. If you read the entire link and not just the first portion of that paragraph it also says:

"however, the Census Bureau has acknowledged the obvious limitations of this definition[13] and the potential merits of a proposal created after the 1950 census that would include changing regional boundaries to include Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia, with the Mid-Atlantic states,"

"Similarly, the Geological Society of America defines the Northeast as these same states but with the addition of Maryland and the District of Columbia.[20] The narrowest definitions include only the states of New England.[21] Other more restrictive definitions include New England and New York as part of the Northeast United States, but exclude Pennsylvania and New Jersey."

I just don't see why this is being brought up every thread, especially when this one isn't a North/South thread.
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Fair enough.
I feel like this is the end result of every thread that involves Maryland or DC.......let's just say the region is "Mid-Atlantic" (regardless of what the Census definition says) or "East Coast."

They need to just have a sticky on this so it isn't constantly repeated in every thread, lol.

Regardless of the Census classifying Maryland and DC as Southern, almost everyone accepts it as Mid-Atlantic (having some qualities of the NE and South), so I think that is the best way to categorize the region (regardless of the definition of Mid-Atlantic that the Census uses, which is not really a common definition IMO).
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Old 02-09-2021, 01:05 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,836 posts, read 7,297,975 times
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I haven't been to Cincinnati, but from Google maps,at least, it kinda resembles Baltimore in some places, and NYC, Pittsburgh in others.

Last edited by KodeBlue; 02-09-2021 at 01:21 PM..
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Old 02-12-2021, 05:58 PM
 
65 posts, read 14,730 times
Reputation: 52
Durham.

Both Durham and Baltimore are the most "urban" cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have the largest minority populations within their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore are the deepest blue most heavily Democratic voting major cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have an among the best in the world private university (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore have a major world class teaching hospital (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore are within a Greater "twin city" CSA metropolitan area
Both Durham and Baltimore are the 2nd largest cities within their respective CSA metropolitan areas (Raleigh and DC)

Last edited by NorthernTransplanted; 02-12-2021 at 06:16 PM..
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Old 02-12-2021, 06:41 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,836 posts, read 7,297,975 times
Reputation: 4419
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernTransplanted View Post
Durham.

Both Durham and Baltimore are the most "urban" cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have the largest minority populations within their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore are the deepest blue most heavily Democratic voting major cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have an among the best in the world private university (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore have a major world class teaching hospital (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore are within a Greater "twin city" CSA metropolitan area
Both Durham and Baltimore are the 2nd largest cities within their respective CSA metropolitan areas (Raleigh and DC)
That's pretty good comparison.
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Old 02-13-2021, 01:21 AM
 
34,991 posts, read 32,408,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernTransplanted View Post
Durham.

Both Durham and Baltimore are the most "urban" cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have the largest minority populations within their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore are the deepest blue most heavily Democratic voting major cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have an among the best in the world private university (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore have a major world class teaching hospital (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore are within a Greater "twin city" CSA metropolitan area
Both Durham and Baltimore are the 2nd largest cities within their respective CSA metropolitan areas (Raleigh and DC)
Durham is like a smaller Baltimore in several respects (which I've noted in the past), but Durham is definitely not the city that's most comparable to Baltimore.

Durham is the most "urban" city in NC? In what way?

And Durham doesn't have the largest minority population in NC; Charlotte does as 59% of its 885,707 residents are non-White, which comes to 522,567 people and that's nearly twice as much as Durham's entire population.
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Old 02-13-2021, 04:24 AM
 
18,998 posts, read 10,720,398 times
Reputation: 33455
Durham doesn’t have the vast slums. Durham also doesn’t have the big contrast between Inner Harbor and the poor sections of the city.


I don’t think there’s a good match. Philly has the slum-Center City contrast. It’s Philly has the same quick Amtrak ride to the dominant nearby city. Philly has the top university.
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Old 02-13-2021, 08:42 AM
 
65 posts, read 14,730 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Durham is like a smaller Baltimore in several respects (which I've noted in the past), but Durham is definitely not the city that's most comparable to Baltimore.

Durham is the most "urban" city in NC? In what way?

And Durham doesn't have the largest minority population in NC; Charlotte does as 59% of its 885,707 residents are non-White, which comes to 522,567 people and that's nearly twice as much as Durham's entire population.
Ethnic diversity is only one aspect of "urban" which Durham has, Charlotte annexed nearly it's entire home county which is why it has the overall numbers. That's like saying Jacksonville Florida is more diverse and bigger than Miami because they did basically the same thing Charlotte did.

Other aspects of "urban" are:

Higher education: Duke University (Charlotte has nothing to compare)

Fine dining: Durham has won multiple James Beard Awards (Charlotte has never won one)

The arts: DPAC is constantly ranked among the top 5 attended live theater venues in the country

Politics: Politics of "urban" areas are usually considered to be left leaning. Durham County is the bluest county in the state (Mecklenburg is a lighter blue than Durham County and only because of the minority population, were it not for the minority population Mecklenburg would likely be a red county just like every other county in the Charlotte region. Durham County is a darker blue county because they have a higher percentage of white liberals and other liberal minorities than Mecklenburg. Mecklenburg is the lone blue dot in a sea of red counties of the greater metropolitan area. Even so, Mecklenburg only when Democratic in the 2020 election by 30% compared to Durham County going Democratic by a whopping 62%. Charlotte is a much more conservative city than Durham overall in a much more conservative metro than the Triangle.

https://er.ncsbe.gov/?election_dt=11...=ALL&contest=0
https://www.dcovotes.com/public-info...ctions-results
https://www.wxii12.com/article/north...y-map/34934633
https://www.dpacnc.com/news/detail/d...ing-attendance

To wit, Durham is the most "urban" city in NC.
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Old 02-13-2021, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
5,926 posts, read 2,827,608 times
Reputation: 6776
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernTransplanted View Post
Durham.

Both Durham and Baltimore are the most "urban" cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have the largest minority populations within their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore are the deepest blue most heavily Democratic voting major cities in their respective states
Both Durham and Baltimore have an among the best in the world private university (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore have a major world class teaching hospital (Duke / Johns Hopkins)
Both Durham and Baltimore are within a Greater "twin city" CSA metropolitan area
Both Durham and Baltimore are the 2nd largest cities within their respective CSA metropolitan areas (Raleigh and DC)
This is a good comparison that I hadn't thought of. There are definitely similarities, but I personally have the same issue that they are completely different scales so they don't seem that similar in light of that. Baltimore is much bigger. I personally think that St. Louis (and possible Louisville or Cincinatti) are the most similar to Baltimore. when you consider size/scale.
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