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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 50 39.06%
Wilmington (Delaware) 19 14.84%
Washington, D.C. 9 7.03%
Norfolk 6 4.69%
Richmond 11 8.59%
Pittsburgh 11 8.59%
Boston 3 2.34%
Other 19 14.84%
Voters: 128. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-18-2021, 12:39 PM
Status: "City Traveler" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Southern USA
66 posts, read 18,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Merging into what?
A mega-CSA of 10 million people; on track to overpass Chicago by population.
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Old 03-18-2021, 02:09 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,851 posts, read 7,301,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fly Dragon View Post
A mega-CSA of 10 million people; on track to overpass Chicago by population.
It's already a CSA. Only on paper will it surpass Chicago. Nobody in their right mind (basically anybody outside of The DC area) is gonna think that Baltimore or DC is bigger than Chicago.
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Old 03-18-2021, 02:38 PM
 
2,123 posts, read 2,265,526 times
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Baltimore resembles Detroit a lot to me in many ways because of their rust-belt characteristics. Both suffered from a large population loss, lots of urban decay, strong economic decline, and high crime rates. However, that is not completely accurate anymore because Detroit is improving a lot at the moment.
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Old 03-18-2021, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
7,837 posts, read 5,880,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
Baltimore resembles Detroit a lot to me in many ways because of their rust-belt characteristics. Both suffered from a large population loss, lots of urban decay, strong economic decline, and high crime rates. However, that is not completely accurate anymore because Detroit is improving a lot at the moment.
Baltimore is not sitting completely still either. With the amount of investment going on around the city, Baltimore is making progress.

https://www.bizjournals.com/baltimor...re/crane-watch
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:00 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,550 posts, read 659,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
Baltimore is not sitting completely still either. With the amount of investment going on around the city, Baltimore is making progress.

https://www.bizjournals.com/baltimor...re/crane-watch
This.

All it takes is 5 minutes of research on Google to understand that despite its issues Baltimore (and St. Louis for that matter) is far from stagnant
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Old 03-18-2021, 08:50 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,851 posts, read 7,301,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joakim3 View Post
This.

All it takes is 5 minutes of research on Google to understand that despite its issues Baltimore (and St. Louis for that matter) is far from stagnant
I drove around the city a couple of weeks ago, and saw a few new projects under construction. Cranes are finally going up at Port Covington as well. Howard street is starting to look better than I remember it; It was the "Park Avenue" of Baltimore a few decades ago. Also, Lexington Market is under construction. There are some small changes happening, but at least they are in the right direction.
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Old 03-18-2021, 09:24 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,550 posts, read 659,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I drove around the city a couple of weeks ago, and saw a few new projects under construction. Cranes are finally going up at Port Covington as well. Howard street is starting to look better than I remember it; It was the "Park Avenue" of Baltimore a few decades ago. Also, Lexington Market is under construction. There are some small changes happening, but at least they are in the right direction.
One has to crawl before they can run

I have faith in the city despite not living there in over half a decade
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Old 03-24-2021, 08:52 PM
 
213 posts, read 265,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Wilmington, aka Baby Baltimore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penna76 View Post
Wilmington is a baby Baltimore on almost all accords.

Delaware and Maryland both have a very similar feel aesthetically/culturally in so many ways.

Pennsylvania and Maryland. Not really at all.
It ain't baby Baltimore, it's baby Philadelphia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
DC is waaaay more similar to Baltimore than Philly is. Heck it’s only 30 mins from Bmore and they are in the same region.
Despite DC being a planned capital city, and Baltimore being a more industrial and maritime city, both cities are very similar. They both have a Washington Monument, both cities are big football cities, huge black majority populations in both cities, both cities are heavily reliant on the federal government for their economies, and both cities are within MD, even though DC is an independent city.

I just don't get the Baltimore/Philadelphia comparisons one bit, which is why I voted DC over Phila. Richmond and Norfolk are somewhat more similar to Baltimore than Philadelphia will ever be due to both of those cities having larger black populations plus the painful legacy of VA and MD as slave states. PA was a free state which is why the Mason-Dixon Line made up the Southern border of PA, the Northern and Eastern border of MD, and the Western border of DE. DE was never a slave state, even though there were some slaves in DE, it was never a big plantation state like VA, NC, SC, and GA.

The only glaring similarity are the row homes, and even those row homes are completely different. Phila has a much larger Latino and Asian population inside and outside it's city limits, way more than Baltimore can dream of. Allentown, Bethlehem, Easton, Reading, and Lancaster have big Latino populations within their city limits. Which town outside Baltimore has similar populations like PA's towns? I'm waiting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoHyping View Post
Only if I had to pick a Midwestern city most like a East Coast city and especially a Philly/Baltimore would I pick St Louis.
When it comes to row homes and squares, I'd agree with the St Louis comparison. When it comes to size, music, being on a major river or body of water, and the impact it had on this country, I'd select Detroit over St. Louis. Detroit had 1.8 million people while Philadelphia had 2.1 million. Both were Top 5 cities, and both cities were cosmopolitan at the time, and still are with Detroit's large black, white ethnic, and Arab communities, and Philadelphia's more diverse mix of blacks, whites, Latinos, and Asians.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joakim3 View Post
If you put St. Louis, Philly & Norfolk in a blender, Baltimore is what you'd end up with.
Nah, if you put St Louis, DC, and Norfolk in a blender, you'd get Baltimore! And one more think which will link St Louis and Baltimore:

KPLR-TV Channel 11
http://img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb2...PLR_-_1990.jpg

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/...20150512043439

WBAL-TV Channel 11
https://www.wbaltv.com/article/wbal-...years/7035858#

https://logos.fandom.com/wiki/WBAL-TV#1975.E2.80.931985

WPIX-TV Channel 11
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/224828206370325426/

https://northpine.com/broadcast/captures/ny/wpix.html

So I guess that not only do St Louis and Baltimore not only have similar Channel 11 logos, but even NY has one too? And I remember the Circle 11 logo from my childhood, too!

Finally, to nip this in the bud, Phila is the nexus for a CSA of about 6 million people. Baltimore isn't even the nexus of it's own CSA, which is 9.8 million, and about to surpass Chicago, along with the Bay Area. Phila has the Delaware Valley (sometimes called the tri-state area) while Baltimore has no claim. Everything MD revolves around Baltimore, while Philadelphia which is the largest city in PA, is more of a center which happens to be in PA and includes NJ and DE. What I'm trying to say is to nip this in the bud because both Baltimore and Philadelphia are dissimilar.

The only cities I can compare Philadelphia to are NYC, Boston, Detroit, St Louis, Pittsburgh, and even San Francisco. Yes, the Wall Street of the West has a Market St. Can you tell me where Market St is in Baltimore, or better yet, does Baltimore have a Broad St? Newark, NJ has one and both Broad Sts are major arteries in Newark and Philadelphia and I see more Philadelphia characteristics with Newark than with Baltimore.

And the Lenni-Lenape were primarily in NY, NJ, PA, and DE, with a sliver of CT and a tiny insignificant shred of MD. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenape Baltimore and DC's Native American tribes were the Susquehannock and it's fitting since the Susquehanna River empties to form the Chesapeake Bay. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native...#Susquehannock

Last edited by wanderer34; 03-24-2021 at 09:02 PM..
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Old 03-25-2021, 02:07 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,851 posts, read 7,301,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderer34 View Post
It ain't baby Baltimore, it's baby Philadelphia.



Despite DC being a planned capital city, and Baltimore being a more industrial and maritime city, both cities are very similar. They both have a Washington Monument, both cities are big football cities, huge black majority populations in both cities, both cities are heavily reliant on the federal government for their economies, and both cities are within MD, even though DC is an independent city.

I just don't get the Baltimore/Philadelphia comparisons one bit, which is why I voted DC over Phila. Richmond and Norfolk are somewhat more similar to Baltimore than Philadelphia will ever be due to both of those cities having larger black populations plus the painful legacy of VA and MD as slave states. PA was a free state which is why the Mason-Dixon Line made up the Southern border of PA, the Northern and Eastern border of MD, and the Western border of DE. DE was never a slave state, even though there were some slaves in DE, it was never a big plantation state like VA, NC, SC, and GA.

The only glaring similarity are the row homes, and even those row homes are completely different. Phila has a much larger Latino and Asian population inside and outside it's city limits, way more than Baltimore can dream of. Allentown, Bethlehem, Easton, Reading, and Lancaster have big Latino populations within their city limits. Which town outside Baltimore has similar populations like PA's towns? I'm waiting.



When it comes to row homes and squares, I'd agree with the St Louis comparison. When it comes to size, music, being on a major river or body of water, and the impact it had on this country, I'd select Detroit over St. Louis. Detroit had 1.8 million people while Philadelphia had 2.1 million. Both were Top 5 cities, and both cities were cosmopolitan at the time, and still are with Detroit's large black, white ethnic, and Arab communities, and Philadelphia's more diverse mix of blacks, whites, Latinos, and Asians.




Nah, if you put St Louis, DC, and Norfolk in a blender, you'd get Baltimore! And one more think which will link St Louis and Baltimore:

KPLR-TV Channel 11
http://img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb2...PLR_-_1990.jpg

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/...20150512043439

WBAL-TV Channel 11
https://www.wbaltv.com/article/wbal-...years/7035858#

https://logos.fandom.com/wiki/WBAL-TV#1975.E2.80.931985

WPIX-TV Channel 11
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/224828206370325426/

https://northpine.com/broadcast/captures/ny/wpix.html

So I guess that not only do St Louis and Baltimore not only have similar Channel 11 logos, but even NY has one too? And I remember the Circle 11 logo from my childhood, too!

Finally, to nip this in the bud, Phila is the nexus for a CSA of about 6 million people. Baltimore isn't even the nexus of it's own CSA, which is 9.8 million, and about to surpass Chicago, along with the Bay Area. Phila has the Delaware Valley (sometimes called the tri-state area) while Baltimore has no claim. Everything MD revolves around Baltimore, while Philadelphia which is the largest city in PA, is more of a center which happens to be in PA and includes NJ and DE. What I'm trying to say is to nip this in the bud because both Baltimore and Philadelphia are dissimilar.

The only cities I can compare Philadelphia to are NYC, Boston, Detroit, St Louis, Pittsburgh, and even San Francisco. Yes, the Wall Street of the West has a Market St. Can you tell me where Market St is in Baltimore, or better yet, does Baltimore have a Broad St? Newark, NJ has one and both Broad Sts are major arteries in Newark and Philadelphia and I see more Philadelphia characteristics with Newark than with Baltimore.

And the Lenni-Lenape were primarily in NY, NJ, PA, and DE, with a sliver of CT and a tiny insignificant shred of MD. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenape Baltimore and DC's Native American tribes were the Susquehannock and it's fitting since the Susquehanna River empties to form the Chesapeake Bay. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native...#Susquehannock
I can cut this post to ribbons.

The bolded is untrue. You may want to look up the reason behind the Mason-Dixon Line.

Baltimore isn't dreaming of being like any city in the northeast. Since we're on the subject, I've noticed that northeastern posters like to ask, "what is your cities version of (insert NE city)'s (insert random whatever)?" People outside of the Northeast don't care about that old rundown mess that Northeasters covet. Cities in other regions of the country are building at a rate that LAP northeastern cities several times over, but they don't exhibit that superiority complex that severely plagues the NE. Other regions are killing it right now, yet the Northeast is talking how much better their old, dirty, rundown, unimpressive cities are than everywhere else. Northeastern cities are cool, but they may want to humble themselves.

This is coming from someone from Baltimore of all places...


Side Note: Boston is alright with me ...

Last edited by KodeBlue; 03-25-2021 at 02:50 AM..
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Old 03-25-2021, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,451 posts, read 4,153,959 times
Reputation: 5504
True, the Mason-Dixon Line was not set up to determine the extent of slave territory, for at the time Mason and Dixon conducted their survey, Pennsylvania had not abolished slavery; that wouldn't happen until after the Declaration of Independence.

The line was drawn merely to settle a bunch of boundary disputes arising from conflicting grants of territory made by two different kings of England, the first to Lord Calvert in 1632, establishing Maryland, and the second and third to William Penn, the second establishing Pennsylvania in 1681 and the third adding the "three lower counties" that became Delaware a few years after that.

Had the second grant used an accurate map, Philadelphia would have been a city in Maryland and the "12-mile circle" around New Castle Court House that forms Delaware's northern border would not have existed.

And Delaware was a slave state. It may not have had large plantations, but it never moved to abolish slavery, nor did it make any formal attempt to secede from the Union, making it the only slave state without major conflict between pro-Confederate and pro-Union factions. (All three of the other "border states" — Kentucky, Maryland and Missouri — did have such conflict, and several Civil War battles occurred in two of those three [and maybe Kentucky too?].)
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