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View Poll Results: What city is the most comparable to Baltimore?
Philadelphia 50 39.06%
Wilmington (Delaware) 19 14.84%
Washington, D.C. 9 7.03%
Norfolk 6 4.69%
Richmond 11 8.59%
Pittsburgh 11 8.59%
Boston 3 2.34%
Other 19 14.84%
Voters: 128. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-26-2021, 12:22 AM
 
213 posts, read 266,186 times
Reputation: 182

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I can cut this post to ribbons.

The bolded is untrue. You may want to look up the reason behind the Mason-Dixon Line.

Baltimore isn't dreaming of being like any city in the northeast. Since we're on the subject, I've noticed that northeastern posters like to ask, "what is your cities version of (insert NE city)'s (insert random whatever)?" People outside of the Northeast don't care about that old rundown mess that Northeasters covet. Cities in other regions of the country are building at a rate that LAP northeastern cities several times over, but they don't exhibit that superiority complex that severely plagues the NE. Other regions are killing it right now, yet the Northeast is talking how much better their old, dirty, rundown, unimpressive cities are than everywhere else. Northeastern cities are cool, but they may want to humble themselves.

This is coming from someone from Baltimore of all places...


Side Note: Boston is alright with me ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason–Dixon_line

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_...nd_free_states

Okay, the line may have never been used to denote which states are slave and free states which is my mistake, but the point of the matter is that DE is tied to Philadelphia and PA economically, culturally, and even religiously, since Quakers did settle in Delaware. How DE became a slave state while PA became a free state is anybody's guess, but the Quakers were mainly abolitionists.

I believe that's why DE has one of the highest Black concentrations in the country due to legacy of slavery, similar to MD, DC, and VA (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...nsus_estimates), but MD, DC, and VA works as one metropolitan unit thanks to DC being the nexus of the Washington-Baltimore-Arlington CSA while DE is a smaller, but still significant portion of the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden PA-NJ-DE-MD CSA (Delaware Valley or Greater Philadelphia).

The point I was trying to make is that there's really no connection between Baltimore and Philadelphia, but there's a true connection to Baltimore and DC, even though there's many people from Bmore who want to continually deny that there's such a connection to DC. Philadelphia and DE has and continues to have a synergetic relationship because it only takes 30 minutes to get to Wilmington from Philadelphia. Baltimore to Wilmington is over an hour (a 75 mi distance) while it's only a 38 mi distance between Baltimore and DC, and it can take as little as 30 min to almost an hour, depending on traffic.

Philadelphia to Newark, NJ is about 85 mi, Philadelphia to NYC is 95 mi, Philadelphia to Atlantic City is 62 miles, Philadelphia to Vineland is 41 mi, Philadelphia to Allentown is 64 mi, Philadelphia to Reading is 58 mi, Philadelphia to Lancaster is 69 mi, and Philadelphia to Wilmington is 28-32 mi. Baltimore to Philadelphia is 106 mi and DC to Philadelphia is 140 mi. Why I displayed the distances between these cities is just to show the relationship between the cities in general. It's arguable that Philadelphia has much more in common with Newark, NJ and NYC than Baltimore and while there are some similarities between Baltimore and Philadelphia, Baltimore and DC has a much stronger relationship between those cities despite both cities boosters wanting to continually deny that relationship, which is crazy because the Washington-Baltimore CSA will soon surpass the Chicago CSA this decade and trying to tie Baltimore and Philadelphia as the same when it's like comparing apples and potatoes. Just work with DC and see how it works out and let us Philadelphians control our destiny.
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Old 03-26-2021, 01:51 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,861 posts, read 7,305,275 times
Reputation: 4426
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderer34 View Post
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason–Dixon_line

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_...nd_free_states

Okay, the line may have never been used to denote which states are slave and free states which is my mistake, but the point of the matter is that DE is tied to Philadelphia and PA economically, culturally, and even religiously, since Quakers did settle in Delaware. How DE became a slave state while PA became a free state is anybody's guess, but the Quakers were mainly abolitionists.

I believe that's why DE has one of the highest Black concentrations in the country due to legacy of slavery, similar to MD, DC, and VA (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...nsus_estimates), but MD, DC, and VA works as one metropolitan unit thanks to DC being the nexus of the Washington-Baltimore-Arlington CSA while DE is a smaller, but still significant portion of the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden PA-NJ-DE-MD CSA (Delaware Valley or Greater Philadelphia).

The point I was trying to make is that there's really no connection between Baltimore and Philadelphia, but there's a true connection to Baltimore and DC, even though there's many people from Bmore who want to continually deny that there's such a connection to DC. Philadelphia and DE has and continues to have a synergetic relationship because it only takes 30 minutes to get to Wilmington from Philadelphia. Baltimore to Wilmington is over an hour (a 75 mi distance) while it's only a 38 mi distance between Baltimore and DC, and it can take as little as 30 min to almost an hour, depending on traffic.

Philadelphia to Newark, NJ is about 85 mi, Philadelphia to NYC is 95 mi, Philadelphia to Atlantic City is 62 miles, Philadelphia to Vineland is 41 mi, Philadelphia to Allentown is 64 mi, Philadelphia to Reading is 58 mi, Philadelphia to Lancaster is 69 mi, and Philadelphia to Wilmington is 28-32 mi. Baltimore to Philadelphia is 106 mi and DC to Philadelphia is 140 mi. Why I displayed the distances between these cities is just to show the relationship between the cities in general. It's arguable that Philadelphia has much more in common with Newark, NJ and NYC than Baltimore and while there are some similarities between Baltimore and Philadelphia, Baltimore and DC has a much stronger relationship between those cities despite both cities boosters wanting to continually deny that relationship, which is crazy because the Washington-Baltimore CSA will soon surpass the Chicago CSA this decade and trying to tie Baltimore and Philadelphia as the same when it's like comparing apples and potatoes. Just work with DC and see how it works out and let us Philadelphians control our destiny.
1. Baltimore and DC are not one unit. That's why there is always a big fuss about it. So many people in Baltimore consider DC "Out of town," but you, nor other people the who play up this "Baltimore and DC are one unit" will understand that because you're not from Baltimore. We have about as little in common with DC as we do with Philly. As I said before only people from DC, and you, are gonna consider DC and/or Baltimore bigger than Chicago, which is absolutely ridiculous.

2. Philly, Delaware and Newark can by identical twins for all I care. I don't see the similarities between Baltimore and any of those places except they're all old/rundown. However, Baltimore isn't going around bragging about how being old/rundown makes it better like people in the northeast do.

3. I AGREE that Philly and Baltimore are nothing alike. Again, Out of Towners keep saying that Baltimore and Philly are similar. They (and you) do that to play up the notion that Baltimore is trying to be a Northeastern city. I told you that the Northeast isn't anything to strive to be in this day and age when so many people are leaving. The northeast is highly overrated

4. I don't know your demographic, but from what I've personally witnessed, and what has been confirmed by family in Philly, is that Baltimore has more influence on Philly than the other way around.

5. People should to stop trying to attach Baltimore to other cities, because we definitely don't wanna attach ourselves to yours.
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Old 03-27-2021, 12:41 AM
 
213 posts, read 266,186 times
Reputation: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
1. Baltimore and DC are not one unit. That's why there is always a big fuss about it. So many people in Baltimore consider DC "Out of town," but you, nor other people the who play up this "Baltimore and DC are one unit" will understand that because you're not from Baltimore. We have about as little in common with DC as we do with Philly. As I said before only people from DC, and you, are gonna consider DC and/or Baltimore bigger than Chicago, which is absolutely ridiculous.
In colonial times before 1800, DC never existed, and the land that was mainly a swamp became DC. DC was a very swampy part of MD (and VA) before it got developed into the nation's capital. Baltimore was a Top 5 city from 1790 to 1870, when Chicago eclipsed Baltimore out of the Top 5. Baltimore was the second largest city in the nation between 1820 to 1854, when the City of Philadelphia encompassed all of Philadelphia County to retake second place after being surpassed by Baltimore, New Orleans, and even Boston at the time.

Philadelphia remained the second largest city until Chicago overtook Philadelphia in the 1890 US Census. Baltimore still remained in the Top 10 well from 1790 to 1990, when it got knocked out of the Top 10 rankings thanks to the growth of San Antonio and San Jose. Philadelphia has remained Top 5 from 1790 until recently in 2014, when Philadelphia was knocked out of the Top 5 due to Phoenix's emergence and our lower population growth. We're currently still in the Top 10.

San Jose may be the biggest city in the Bay Area, but it's not the most important. That title still belongs to San Francisco despite SF being smaller than SJ. Baltimore for the longest was the big dog in that region due to manufacturing, maritime, and immigration of Germans, Irish, Polish, Bohemians, Italians, and Lithuanians. It was the biggest city in the region from 1790 to 2010, when DC finally eclipsed Baltimore. The reason being that Baltimore was too tied to manufacturing and the port while DC was mainly reliant on the federal government. White collar DC overtook blue collar Baltimore because a lot of the manufacturing that characterized Baltimore were outsourced further South or overseas. It still has a vibrant, and in my opinion, a better port than Philadelphia.

Many of the imports that arrive to the DC area comes from Baltimore just like how many of the imports that arrive to NYC goes through Newark nowadays due to the high costs of land in NYC. Philadelphia is independent of those two ports. I figured you would've known that by now, as Baltimore has one of the biggest and most important ports in the country, which not only serves MD, but DC, VA, and WV.

Honestly, if Baltimore wants to still be just as important in the DMV area, it needs to learn something from SF on how to attract people to it's city limits. Right now, the city's population as of 2019 is 593,490 while SF has 881,549 and growing. SF surpassed Baltimore in 2000. Although it's not the biggest city in CA (fourth largest behind LA, SD, and SJ) it's arguably the most important as a lot of Fortune 500 companies are headquartered there as well as being the nexus of the Bay Area, and an important financial, economic, and tourism center for the Bay Area. Baltimore has to figure out it strengths and it really has no choice but to pull it's weight in the DMV cog if it wants to survive. If it doesn't pull it's weight in that cog, it will fall and trying to deny that DC exists is only going to hurt Baltimore in the long run. It has no choice but to work with DC in the long run and that's the future of Baltimore whether you like it or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
2. Philly, Delaware and Newark can by identical twins for all I care. I don't see the similarities between Baltimore and any of those places except they're all old/rundown. However, Baltimore isn't going around bragging about how being old/rundown makes it better like people in the northeast do.

3. I AGREE that Philly and Baltimore are nothing alike. Again, Out of Towners keep saying that Baltimore and Philly are similar. They (and you) do that to play up the notion that Baltimore is trying to be a Northeastern city. I told you that the Northeast isn't anything to strive to be in this day and age when so many people are leaving. The northeast is highly overrated
Baltimore is more of a Northern and Southern city as well as Mid-Atlantic. Philadelphia has more in common with New York, Newark, NJ, and even Boston to a certain degree. Baltimore and DC are joined to the hip. No I never said Baltimore is or was trying to be a Northeast city. It's part of the East Coast, and technically it's Northeastern, but in many ways, it's also Southern due to the large black majority population, and the Southern-influenced accent Bmore has. I could probably pick out somebody from Bmore just by the way they talk.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
4. I don't know your demographic, but from what I've personally witnessed, and what has been confirmed by family in Philly, is that Baltimore has more influence on Philly than the other way around.
Outside of row homes and maybe crabs, not at all. NY and NJ has way more influence in Phila because we have to deal with those two states more than MD and DC. The DMV area is it's own world while NY, NJ, PA, and even DE have to struggle with each other. https://www.nj.com/entertainment/202...other-day.html I guess this link will tell you more about each region.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
5. People should to stop trying to attach Baltimore to other cities, because we definitely don't wanna attach ourselves to yours.
Tell the original poster that!!!
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Old 03-27-2021, 02:15 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,861 posts, read 7,305,275 times
Reputation: 4426
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderer34 View Post
In colonial times before 1800, DC never existed, and the land that was mainly a swamp became DC. DC was a very swampy part of MD (and VA) before it got developed into the nation's capital. Baltimore was a Top 5 city from 1790 to 1870, when Chicago eclipsed Baltimore out of the Top 5. Baltimore was the second largest city in the nation between 1820 to 1854, when the City of Philadelphia encompassed all of Philadelphia County to retake second place after being surpassed by Baltimore, New Orleans, and even Boston at the time.

Philadelphia remained the second largest city until Chicago overtook Philadelphia in the 1890 US Census. Baltimore still remained in the Top 10 well from 1790 to 1990, when it got knocked out of the Top 10 rankings thanks to the growth of San Antonio and San Jose. Philadelphia has remained Top 5 from 1790 until recently in 2014, when Philadelphia was knocked out of the Top 5 due to Phoenix's emergence and our lower population growth. We're currently still in the Top 10.

San Jose may be the biggest city in the Bay Area, but it's not the most important. That title still belongs to San Francisco despite SF being smaller than SJ. Baltimore for the longest was the big dog in that region due to manufacturing, maritime, and immigration of Germans, Irish, Polish, Bohemians, Italians, and Lithuanians. It was the biggest city in the region from 1790 to 2010, when DC finally eclipsed Baltimore. The reason being that Baltimore was too tied to manufacturing and the port while DC was mainly reliant on the federal government. White collar DC overtook blue collar Baltimore because a lot of the manufacturing that characterized Baltimore were outsourced further South or overseas. It still has a vibrant, and in my opinion, a better port than Philadelphia.

Many of the imports that arrive to the DC area comes from Baltimore just like how many of the imports that arrive to NYC goes through Newark nowadays due to the high costs of land in NYC. Philadelphia is independent of those two ports. I figured you would've known that by now, as Baltimore has one of the biggest and most important ports in the country, which not only serves MD, but DC, VA, and WV.

Honestly, if Baltimore wants to still be just as important in the DMV area, it needs to learn something from SF on how to attract people to it's city limits. Right now, the city's population as of 2019 is 593,490 while SF has 881,549 and growing. SF surpassed Baltimore in 2000. Although it's not the biggest city in CA (fourth largest behind LA, SD, and SJ) it's arguably the most important as a lot of Fortune 500 companies are headquartered there as well as being the nexus of the Bay Area, and an important financial, economic, and tourism center for the Bay Area. Baltimore has to figure out it strengths and it really has no choice but to pull it's weight in the DMV cog if it wants to survive. If it doesn't pull it's weight in that cog, it will fall and trying to deny that DC exists is only going to hurt Baltimore in the long run. It has no choice but to work with DC in the long run and that's the future of Baltimore whether you like it or not.



Baltimore is more of a Northern and Southern city as well as Mid-Atlantic. Philadelphia has more in common with New York, Newark, NJ, and even Boston to a certain degree. Baltimore and DC are joined to the hip. No I never said Baltimore is or was trying to be a Northeast city. It's part of the East Coast, and technically it's Northeastern, but in many ways, it's also Southern due to the large black majority population, and the Southern-influenced accent Bmore has. I could probably pick out somebody from Bmore just by the way they talk.



Outside of row homes and maybe crabs, not at all. NY and NJ has way more influence in Phila because we have to deal with those two states more than MD and DC. The DMV area is it's own world while NY, NJ, PA, and even DE have to struggle with each other. https://www.nj.com/entertainment/202...other-day.html I guess this link will tell you more about each region.



Tell the original poster that!!!
1. I need to you understand something: BALTIMORE IS NOT PART OF THE DMV. The DMV is not our region, our metro, our hometown. The DMV is DC and its suburbs, NOT THE BALTIMORE AREA.

2. I don't see the point of the history lessons. You're stating things that I already know about the city that I'm from.

3. Baltimore is a great influence in Philly as well. I know that you're black, so it may be easier to explain to you the Baltimore influences that you see in Philly.

4. Baltimore IS NOT MORE OF A NORTHERN CITY. Baltimore is a technically, historically, currently, demographically, culturally and officially a southern city. Show me where the census placed Baltimore, a historically southern city, in to the northeastern region of the US. VA Beach, Charleston, Miami, DC, Orlando, Jacksonville, Wilmington NC are all East Coast cities as well, but they, like Baltimore, are all southern cities.

5. The Baltimore accent isn't a "southern-influenced" accent, it is a full-blown, yet unique, southern accent; the same way that New Orleans, Miami, SC gullah/Geechee have their own distinct accents. Anybody can spot a Baltimore accent by the way we talk. Nobody other city sounds anything like us. Philly wants to lump their accents with the antiquated NYC accent, but we don't want to sound like anyone else.


This is what I don't understand: Why are people trying to claim that Baltimore isn't in the south, just to say that Baltimore is southern? It's like people from other regions (particularly the NE) want us to want to be part of the northeast just so northeasterners can say that we're not. Baltimore, like the rest of the country, does not care about the northeast. The northeast has passed its prime. The northeast DOES NOT wield the cultural influence that it once did. This is not the 90s, and many people (you included) are trying to get the heck out of the northeast.
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,455 posts, read 4,156,587 times
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You may be overstating the difference between Baltimore and Philadelphia, given that Delaware is also technically in the South per the Office of Management and Budget.

And (once again) I think one of the reasons Baltimore gets classed as "not Southern" despite both its history and Maryland's is because it was a major industrial metropolis. "The South" of both the Confederate and the general popular imagination was a largely agrarian society, and most of the cities the South produced prior to the Civil War were based on trading exclusively, with little or no manufacturing activity. Yes, Baltimore was a port too, and I agree with the Philadelphian upthread who said it's a bigger and livelier port than Philadelphia, but Baltimore also had many factories from the early 19th century onward, in stark contrast to other Southern cities.

It's also that shared industrial heritage that is the thread linking Baltimore and Philadelphia via Wilmington, which was also an industrial center, albeit a much smaller one. However, it was known principally for being the home of Delaware's largest industrial company (and its largest homegrown one), DuPont.

As has already been noted, Washington had no industry to speak of, and still doesn't: the largest "manufacturer" based in the District is The Washington Post Company (it "manufactures" its namesake newspaper). Georgetown and Alexandria were both also trading posts mainly. Thus Baltimore is also dramatically different from DC despite their shared Southern heritage (which JFK famously referred to in his quip about the characteristics of Washington).
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:41 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,540 posts, read 19,504,282 times
Reputation: 15532
I voted "other": St. Louis.

Baltimore and St. Louis are twin Northeastern cities. People in St. Louis say "soda" instead of "pop," which makes it a Northeastern city. Geography is fun.
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:55 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,861 posts, read 7,305,275 times
Reputation: 4426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
I voted "other": St. Louis.

Baltimore and St. Louis are twin Northeastern cities. People in St. Louis say "soda" instead of "pop," which makes it a Northeastern city. Geography is fun.
People are creating arguments just to argue against it. Crazy, right?
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Old 03-27-2021, 11:13 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,540 posts, read 19,504,282 times
Reputation: 15532
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
People are creating arguments just to argue against it. Crazy, right?
What I said was partially tongue-in-cheek. Having been to both Baltimore and St. Louis, St. Louis is the Baltimore of the Midwest.
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Old 03-27-2021, 12:01 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
8,861 posts, read 7,305,275 times
Reputation: 4426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
What I said was partially tongue-in-cheek. Having been to both Baltimore and St. Louis, St. Louis is the Baltimore of the Midwest.
I understood that there was a hint of sarcasm in your post. I was Piggy-backing what you were saying.
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:58 PM
 
35,023 posts, read 32,428,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
1. Baltimore and DC are not one unit. That's why there is always a big fuss about it. So many people in Baltimore consider DC "Out of town," but you, nor other people the who play up this "Baltimore and DC are one unit" will understand that because you're not from Baltimore. We have about as little in common with DC as we do with Philly. As I said before only people from DC, and you, are gonna consider DC and/or Baltimore bigger than Chicago, which is absolutely ridiculous.

2. Philly, Delaware and Newark can by identical twins for all I care. I don't see the similarities between Baltimore and any of those places except they're all old/rundown. However, Baltimore isn't going around bragging about how being old/rundown makes it better like people in the northeast do.

3. I AGREE that Philly and Baltimore are nothing alike. Again, Out of Towners keep saying that Baltimore and Philly are similar. They (and you) do that to play up the notion that Baltimore is trying to be a Northeastern city. I told you that the Northeast isn't anything to strive to be in this day and age when so many people are leaving. The northeast is highly overrated

4. I don't know your demographic, but from what I've personally witnessed, and what has been confirmed by family in Philly, is that Baltimore has more influence on Philly than the other way around.

5. People should to stop trying to attach Baltimore to other cities, because we definitely don't wanna attach ourselves to yours.
You're somewhere between taking this way too personally and denying reality.
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